Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Farmyard Manure


 
Most Recent Posts GRAVEL DRIVE CARE
Last post: I love Trees!!!
Is this Spiraea japonica
Last post: Greengage
Beech Head leaf browning issue
Last post: Greengage
Small lawn advice please
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
caoimhin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 03 Jun 2008
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:55 pm    Post subject: Farmyard Manure Reply with quote

Can anyone advise on whether or not old cow manure which has been emersed in old slurry would be good or bad for a vegetable garden. Also my potatoe drills are exceptionally wet what with all the wet weather. The soil appears to hold a lot of water. Should any remedial action be taken? Many Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

your soil might need to be drained or it is a heavy peaty soil, test it by observing how long it takes a hole one foot deep full of water to drain off after rain, if more than a day then it needs to be drained. this is done by laying a trench of stones or land drain pipe from highest point to lowest point.
it helps to plant crops in raised beds or on tops of drills rather than on flat.
Cow manure immersed in slurry is worth adding to a vegetable garden though it would be low in nutrient value because of it's age it would be good for the soil structure. very good for potatoes, onions, cabbage cauliflowers peas and beans but not for carrrots parsnips or beet or lettuce. cow manure is good to improve heavy soils. Hope this helps you.
michael brenock horticultural advisor retired

_________________
michael brenock
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
caoimhin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 03 Jun 2008
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Michael, my drills go with the fall and I have started a drain across the low end. I'm hoping this will help but the rain keeps falling! How resiliant is seed potatoe to all this wet weather/ground?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 1:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

caoimhin, an important part of your question is missing. How long ago ws the manure sitting in the slurry? THe old manure will be very beneficial fo your soil, but if it's currently sitting in slurry or was so in the last few months, be very careful. It is high in Nitrates, not good. Farmers are actually obliged by law to have slurry spread by October 15th for this reason, to allow the Nitrates to clear.
If your manure was recently removed from the slurry, you would be better to stack until next digging season. Otherwise you might find algaes and slimes growing on your veg plot.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Posts: 1010

PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

also, what's the consistency of it?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the reason that the farmers are obliged to have slurry spread by october is to prevent the nitrates seeping into the ground water
michael brenock
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, my point exactly. Who in their right mind would manure a veg plot full of Nitrates?
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
caoimhin
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 03 Jun 2008
Posts: 26

PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i think the slurry was added to the manure, not too sure how old it was though. Will need to check.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - present IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)