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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Hard landscaping in Ireland, Garden Features (Paths, Patios, Paving, Decking, Walls etc)

Clay Chiminea help.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful advert for the fern
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a tripod too!
Is this site not enough for you? Should I follow you there and annoy you there too???

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Dancer
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sue Deacon wrote:
My experience of ivy is that it won't grow where you want it to, just everywhere you don't want it to!

Japanese Painted Fern is a beauty, very graceful. It is evergreen and the young foliage has a pink tinge.

I knew I had a pic somewhere. That's it on the left. It's planted by the pond now and looks great.


Would a fern not be too big? I'm only planting in the bottom part of the chiminea .
I'm embarrassed that I know so little about gardening so
I really am grateful for all the advice . Bob is gorgeous !!!
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 3:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sempervivum can grow vertically in the opening. Need no care; just face the opening southwards in a sunny position.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dancer wrote:
Would a fern not be too big? I'm only planting in the bottom part of the chiminea. I'm embarrassed that I know so little about gardening so
I really am grateful for all the advice . Bob is gorgeous !!!


It is not a massive plant, but if you wanted smaller ferns there is always the native hart's tongue and crested hart's tongue and polypody. You'd never guess I liked ferns. Laughing

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tippben
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2016 10:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nasturtiums? The main problem will be the small quantity of available soil.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2016 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will not get enough water if you leave the lid on either.
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've drilled holes in lots of pots, terracotta and hard stoneware and none of them have broken. I make sure to put the pot on a resilient, not hard, surface and then use an ordinary masonry drill, using a variable speed electric drill. You may need to allow the bit to cool from time to time, as you go.
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