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Redesigned back garden. Would like your suggestions.


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Good guy
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2015 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My iPhone seems to work the site better, in that the photos look as though their proportions are correct whereas on the iPad they are stretched. However, neither appliance is opening the various sections: larger pond, alpine troughs etc.
It's a pity, because what I can see looks superb, as usual. I haven't used the laptop yet.
Re the Shannon trip: yes, a lifetime of memories, indeed. I kept a daily log in a school exercise book - still have it. And in a way, it's better to have no photographs as the images in memory are so strong. My companion went on to do a lot more sailing, transatlantic etc.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Borrowed view.



Rampant heather.



Top pond (or bottom pond depending whether you're coming or going.) Smile Smile


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A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 1:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm wondering what mixture you use in your crevice garden troughs. I want to experiment with something similar soon and would value your input.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First of all I started off badly, I'd say, with 100% soil in the first few troughs, although I did put a layer of gravel at the bottom.

Then I moved to 80% soil and 20% gravelly mix.

Then I changed to 66% soil and 33% limestone grit, which I found in a farmer's yard.

I've 3 new troughs to do. I'm going to make these mostly limestone grit (if I can find the stuff) or failing that, mostly a gravelly/sandy mix, which I might have left over from my latest project.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that. I was going to use the granite grit I have to hand but I suppose it makes sense to use limestone - that's what the Alps are made of, after all!

Now that I come to think af it, there's a limestone quarry near Raphoe. I might take a run over there and see if they'd give me some of their rubbishy stuff. I can always riddle it. Would the 'quarry dust' that is used for blinding hardcore be too fine, do you think? That should be readily available.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't really know if quarry dust would be suitable. Wouldn't it go rock hard? but then, maybe, that's what alpines like. And Saxifrages like to grow in Tufa and that's just solid rock. So probably it would be ideal for lime-loving plants.

I heard of a lot of people using granite grit so that should be OK. Being acidic it would certainly suit Lewisias.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 11:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Growing a range of alpines is a long term plan - I may make an alpine area in a part of the garden I plan to alter radically this year. Meanwhile I'll pot on the 3 lewisias I have, using the granite grit; I've a nice big pot for them.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Guy, this site might be of interest to you.

http://portraitsofalpineplants.com/Portraits%20of%20Alpine%20Plants.htm

http://portraitsofalpineplants.com/Troughs%20and%20Sinks.html

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that, I've just had the quickest look at the first one while sheltering from a nasty shower (I'm doing a bit of tidying). It's very good - lots of inspiration. I'll look at them both at my leisure, later.
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ormondsview
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 4:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm doing the upward slope that climbs 20 feet within 60 feet length. Whatever I dig out goes into the beds and the rocks are making the path up the centre. It's a laborious, time consuming process as the gorse and thatch grass needs axe, snippers, and a long handled screwdriver.
Soil is drier, less peaty than in the boggy areas through the garden but I'd say it's lacking nutrients. How can I tell? Very few worms in the higher up areas. The wild rhodos that I've started on the hill are scraggly, showing even they are starved for more compost. At any rate, the plan is to heap the grasses as mulch, the old gorse breaks down very quickly, some seaweed to cover and more soil where I can get it without transporting. Far too awkward to drag it up there. Got some seeds off ebay like nasturtiums which will ground cover and some alpines. There's plenty enough wild heather here and there. But trying to save it is interfering with the whole whack and doing the bones of the garden. Plan is to put in anchor plants with tenacious rooting power like Stella d'Oro daylilies to fend off creeping invaders.

Question: What does really well in this kind of steep bank that's low growing, reliable, and hardy enough to tolerate some exposure to winds and sea breeze?
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 22, 2015 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Juniper?
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2015 12:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kindred Spirit, I've had a good read of those websites. Much food for thought there, so thanks very much. I got out my drawing board today to start working on developing ideas for the area I want to redevelop and I'm looking forward to the challenge.

I'll be doing a lot more research into alpines as I'm pretty sure I want to include them in my design. Garden visits and reading go leor! Am I right in thinking lewisias would grow well in a north facing drystone wall? I will be dealing with a North aspect for some of the area.

I'm probably going to use a dark blue-grey local limestone as the quartzite and sandstone that are most used around here are done to death - too many pretentious walls with over-fancy gates!
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2015 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm having trouble with Lewisias. I know it's one of the most difficult plants of all to keep alive but so far I'm only having a 50% success rate. I'm used to things not failing. Sad Sad Your North facing wall is a very good idea. Will they be in a rain shadow as well? I find that the stems rot even though they are planted vertically in well drained soil. In their natural habitat in the Rockies they must grow in areas that have zero rainfall; they're succulents after all. I'm going to have to put my thinking cap on. Smile Smile

Research into Alpines. You could join the Alpine Garden Society. they publish a fabulous magazine three or four times a year. I hadn't joined because someone passes on the magazine to me when she's read it. But I must join sometime soon.
Also, (if we're allowed to mention other forums) the Scottish Rock Garden forum is an inexhaustible well of information. It has an international clientele.

There's also an Alpine Show coming up in Dublin on the 11th of April. (Cabinteely?) I must go again this year. I've been once before and it was brill.
Two weeks later, there's the Ulster one in Greenmount Agr College, Antrim, Saturday the 25th.

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2015 5:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love my Xeric section in the garden. If I won the Lotto, I'd cover most of the garden over and have Xeric and Tropical plants. (And a Fern section and an Alpine section. Don't want much, do I? Smile Smile )



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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2015 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to say kindredspirit, those are stunning plants!

I long ago gave up on Alpines, succulents, large-leaved plants and any perennial over 5ft! The perils of living in a soggy wind tunnel.
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