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Price of a pea


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Good guy
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 10:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So called 'sugar peas' are sweet, good to eat, pod and all. Just eat them before the pod gets tough, if you want to eat the whole thing. Mange tout varieties are usually eaten while the pod is still quite flat, while sugar peas are often eaten at a slightly more mature stage.
Last year I grew Winterkeefe Mangetout from Seed Savers, they were vey good, tasty and prolific; vigorous growers to 2m+ and with attractive flowers. This year I'm growing Sugar Snap Delikatt from Green Vegetable Seeds. They will grow to 65cm. I'll need to give them some sticks before the weekend.
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
...nature doesn't make seeds fall off their parent plants in any particular way so I can't see the need for the gardener to sow to a prescribed pattern.

It's a matter of efficiency.
If you sow the seeds very close together (e.g. two seeds per square centimetre), they'll compete with each other for water, air, light, nutrients, etc. Also, planted too close together and there is an increased chance of disease, and transmission of disease.
If you sow the seeds far apart (e.g. two seeds per square metre), yes you'll have larger healthier plants, but a much smaller crop per square metre.

Usually the planting distances on the packets are calculated to give the optimum return per unit area.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, My Potatoes, I can see the logic of what you say and no doubt the seedsmen assume the gardener is only sowing bought seed, i.e. not saving any from the previous year.

As mentioned on another post I tend to apply nutrients where the seed/plant is and, in the case of peas, I line my hoed out row with manure so that there's plenty of nutrition for the bought seed to feed on. I then sow probably ten times as many saved from the year before so that, if a few don't make it for some reason, it doesn't really matter.

We eat them in season and use Chinese restaurant plastic boxes to freeze the rest, often mixed with broad beans, and we seldom buy any. Mind you, there are only the two of us.

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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well that's the nutrients covered. How about the water, air, light, etc?
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I genuinely don't know, MP, but can only say that the way I do it produces peas in sufficient quantities for our needs, so I stick to it. Presumably those plants that can't get enough of the three elements you mention will die - although water and air aren't normally in short supply in West Cork - but there are plenty more.

You're welcome to drop in and inspect the plot one day.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2014 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might be right about the Thompson & Morgan seed germination rate blowin. Had a walkthrough today and was not impressed. Early days yet I know but compared to the others seed suppliers they are definitely lagging behind. Nothing more than an inch high yet anyway. Will keep you informed.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Potatoes - Just to explain why I'm maybe a bit defensive.
Tagwex - This is my row as of this morning. I measured it at 22ft long and, although it may not be easily visible, the length of 3ft border fencing that holds the whole lot up is on this side - with the willow sticks on the other.

I bought 2 (not over generous) packets of Rondo seed from T&M and spread them along the row I'd drawn out with a broad hoe. I had a plastic Lucozade bottle of Hurst Greenshaft seed saved from last year and these followed the Rondos into the row. All done on 12 March.

Obviously I can't sort out Rondos from Greenshafts but this is the sort of result I've had for the last 6 years, and hence my tendency to carry on this way.



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it ain't broke, don't fix it! Good healthy looking plants Blowin. What else are you growing?
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apart from older? Parsnips, Carrots, Runner and Broad Beans, Baby Broccoli, Purple Sprouting, Spring Hero Cabbage, Swedes, Sprouts, Curly Kale, Red and White Onions plus the obligatory Spuds, Kestrel and Desiree. Raspberries, Strawberries and Blackcurrants in the fruit department
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good variety. I have Lord Roseberry and Sharpes Express spuds, runner, broad and French beans, peas, garlic, onions, leeks, chard, beet root, bok choi and various lettuce. Selection of herbs. Tayberries, gooseberries, black and red currants, blueberries, and I need to build a cage for these to keep the birds out.
Keeps me busy - I'm going out now to do a bit.
I'm growing some older, too, the variety with creaky joints!
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Note to self. Sow in March NOT May.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2014 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Walking along in Sussex over the weekend, I passed a small garden and saw some very tall peas growing - absolutely festooned with pods. The owner was there so I asked him what they were.

He knew the variety was 'Alderman' but didn't know whether they're still available as he'd been saving his own seed for years. They were growing well above his 8ft canes and, in the same row and just as tall, were some more plants with dark maroon pods on - name forgotten but he'd already had several feeds off them, he claimed, and there were plenty of full pods on view.

He gave me a few of each which I'll plant as a test and for 2015 seed. Does anyone else have experience of 'Alderman'?

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 02, 2014 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Obviously not a Thompson & Morgan then!
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This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 05, 2014 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Better not slag off T&M too much. Good Guy had fairly good results so maybe I was just the unlucky one - although I never had such mixed results with Dobies. A bit of browsing has revealed an 'ie' version of Marshalls of Cambridge's web site that looks more professional than most. Not only do they answer emails promptly, they also ship to this country so I'll give them a try next year.

One thing my Sussex gardener did do, however, that isn't commonly associated with peas as far as I know, is to start his off in lengths of guttering/eave shutes so that he can slide them straight off into a drill.

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tippben
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 05, 2014 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I grew up in Sussex, near Arundel. I sowed my mangetout direct this year, as I couldn't afford compost. They are fine.
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