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Raised bed compost filling


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My Potatoes
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Joined: 27 Feb 2013
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Location: Cork

PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In that case you're probably better off going to a growing media supplier such as Mulch.ie or Landscape Depot. A cubic metre of standard topsoil is about 50 or you can specify exactly what (clay/sand/silt ratio, pH, etc) for about 70.
You'll find that cows manure straight from the farm will contain silage plastic and nylon from bales of hay. And lots of weed seeds. Horse manure can contain worming residue which kills earthworms.
Seaweed from the shore will contain plastic and other flotsam. I found the elastic waistband from a discarded underpants in my most recent load!
Leaf mould should be almost contaminant free, so long as its collect away from paths and roadways.
Judging the best material is a matter of choice, judging the best price is easy; but the best material for the best price will be down to the user.


Last edited by My Potatoes on Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

caz87 wrote:
I'm not worried about the nutrient side of things, as I said, iv free access to manure.


Contrary to popular belief, manure is not high in nutrients. Its primary benefit to the soil is by improving the structure.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 17, 2013 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Contrary to popular belief, manure is not high in nutrients. Its primary benefit to the soil is by improving the structure.


You have me now my potatoes, I had always heard that good old horse sh1t was the best thing ever to put on the ground. Regularly heard old gardeners stating it over the years. Any science to back it up? I am not disbelieving you but I am wondering.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

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Sive
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2013 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just as surprised as you, Tagwex, to read MyPotatoes comment, especially as we have a free supply of horse manure from our neighbours and feel extremely fortunate to do so. I'll be doing some googling methinks to see what the facts are.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2013 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why, oh why did we always dash out in the road with a shovel if a horse left an offering outside our place? Why do farmers spread slurry on their fields?

Surely natural manure is Nature's original fertiliser. Hence chicken droppings for leeks etc. As others have said, leaf mould and composted vegetation of any sort is beneficial. It makes absolute sense - if a plant has matured to a healthy size, it must have derived its success from nutrients in the soil which are still there in its various parts. By returning them to the soil, that goodness can be recycled for whatever comes next. If that wasn't the system, there'd have to be an inexhaustible supply of new minerals - which there ain't!

The nutritional value of a particular manure will inevitably depend on the food the animal has eaten - not forgetting all the other junk that farmers pile into them these days - and, because horses will tend to be looked after rather better than other livestock, their's is probably better, but only for that reason.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2013 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@MY POTATOES: COME IN MY POTATOES YOUR NUMBER IS UP, EXPLAIN YOURSELF THE PUBLIC ARE DEMANDING TO KNOW..........

Hey Blowin, I too go out with the shovel and gather up the green goodness, bit of a horsey area around here.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2013 6:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
@MY POTATOES: COME IN MY POTATOES YOUR NUMBER IS UP, EXPLAIN YOURSELF THE PUBLIC ARE DEMANDING TO KNOW..........

Nice to see some traffic on this forum, isn't it?
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2013 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It sure is, as I have been thinking that for the number of views compared to the number of comments that there must be a lot of voyeurs out there.

GET INVOLVED - SHARE THE WISDOM.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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ian
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 18, 2013 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The nitrogen and potassium levels in horse manure are quite high and cheap. Its use therefore is to be recommended. Have a look at this link it gives a table of NPK content of various animal manures. Some poultry manure along with horse would seem to cover all bases.
www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/M1192.html

Regards, Ian.
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2013 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should clarify that I was referring to "farmyard manure", ie cow and horse, rather than other forms such as chicken.
I've never conducted any nutrient analysis myself.

When I studied horticulture it was emphasised that FYM was added to the soil as a soil conditioner rather than a fertiliser. Yes, it does contain nutrients but this was not its primary usage.
All my classmates (including myself) were surprised by this, bar one. He worked in a garden centre and was aware of this, though he did say that none of his customers were aware of it.
At other stages of the course if we suggested the use of FYM as a fertiliser we were warned that this would lose us marks.
Maybe it was just a "thing" of the RHS examiners.
Anyway, since then, I'd always ensure to use an appropriate fertilizer, as well as FYM for the purpose of improving the soil structure; an act which would make nutrients more available anyway.

Just to emphasise one point, I never suggest that manure does not contain nutrients, is not good or that its use is not essential.

Somebody wrote of farmers using slurry, which brings another interesting point. "Slurry" usually refers to fresh manure, high in nitrogen which is why the grass grows so well. But we've all be warned to use "well-rotted manure", which will have significantly lower amounts of nitrogen.

In the past I did some googling on the matter and most of the suggestion that FYM is high is nutrients is from manufacturers, vendors and amateurs. Even the link provided gives a table of analysis of fresh manure rather than the stuff that us gardeners use.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2013 10:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well that has put us all in our place and we all thought we knew about shite (obviously we just talk it) ! Just look what a bit of education can do. I for one, am honoured to be in your presence my potatoes.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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