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GROWING GREAT ROSES


 
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inishindie
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Joined: 27 May 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 3:40 pm    Post subject: GROWING GREAT ROSES Reply with quote

Ever had problems growing roses? Well, if you've answered yes then fear not because here we will look at the basics of growing great roses. I used to have a bit of an aversion to the spikes on rose bushes. The reason for this was because I used to charge into gardens to do the work and if there was a spiky plant it would get me. As I have slowed down a bit I can now appreciate why these plants are so popular.


GROWING GREAT ROSES
If you are just beginning to grow roses, select a healthy specimen from your local nursery. Nurseries generally choose plants that do well in your area and have healthy stock. Roses can be purchased bare-rooted or in a container. They should have 2 healthy, green stems, minimum. Pay attention to the root system. Does it have 4-5 thick roots and multitudes of smaller, fibrous roots? If so you are hopefully picking a good one.



A rose will become a permanent member of your garden. Therefore it is important to choose a site that takes this into consideration. A rose should receive at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily in order to thrive. Morning sun is preferable for most plants, including the rose. Avoid planting your rose in areas that receive high winds. You can protect your roses by planting them near a fence, wall or other barrier.



Don't plant roses too close to other shrubs or trees. These will compete with the rose for nutrients, sunlight and water. Roses do not like to stand in water so make sure they have proper drainage.

Prepare your soil.
Roses prefer heavy clay loam that has been thoroughly tilled and enriched with organic matter. Organic fertilizers can be bought. These should have the three basic elements - nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium or NPK. The ratio should be 6-2-1, not exceeding 15. You can also custom make your own organic matter by composting and add this to the soil. Failing that just throw your old banana skins around the plant (these are high in potassium, which is great for rose development). The drainage, aeration and moisture content will all be improved with the addition of organic matter. Add lime to very acid soils and add organic matter to alkaline soils.




WHEN TO PLANT

Plant bare-rooted roses preferably in the late autumn or early winter and if you must, in the early spring. If planting is delayed, keep the roots moist and store in a cool, dark place. Plant as soon as possible. Container grown roses can be planted any time of the year as long as the soil is not frozen.


Plant your roses correctly.

First, make sure your roots are thoroughly wet by letting the bare roots or container soak in water up to an hour before planting. Prune off any dead, damaged or diseased roots and top growth. Dig a hole deep enough to accommodate all the roots comfortably. Holes should be around 12-18 inches deep and 15-18 inches wide. They should not be crowded. The bud union (the place where the roots and top growth meet) should rest approximately 1 inch below the soil's surface. At this time you could add bone meal or compost. Make a small mound of dirt at the bottom of the hole. Spread the roots around this mound making sure that bunches of roots, clumps, are separated. Cut off any scraggly roots. Generally on new rose bushes, the canes sprout mainly from one side.




To produce a well-rounded plant, place the rose with the sprouting side facing north. The southern exposure will help to stimulate growth on the bare side of your rose. Depending upon their final size, in general, roses should be spaced 1 foot from the edge of the bed and 30 inches apart. Rose bushes should be provided with at least 2.5 to 4 feet of space in which to grow. While miniature roses only need about 12 inches in which to grow. Plant climbing roses in the same manner but provide them with support from the very beginning. Finally, fill your hole in with soil, packing firmly around the base of the rose. Water the plant thoroughly. Do not mulch until spring.

Don't forget toFeed and water your roses regularly.

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earnie
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 10:41 am    Post subject: Moving Rose Bushes Reply with quote

Can anyone offer advice on the best method to move rose bushes.
I am moving home soon and have four that I desperately want to keep as they were planted for sentimental reasons.
Thanks.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

earnie, have a look a this post.... Transplanting Small Trees & Shrubs
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inishindie
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:37 pm    Post subject: underplanting Reply with quote

UNDERPLANTING ROSES

The roses might be more prone to pest attacks in its first year of being moved. Underplanting might help.

Question: What should I underplant my roses with to kill aphids? I know it is a bit late in the year but the problem has been so bad that I would like to be well prepared for next year. Thanks D.L. by e-mail

Reply:

Underplanting roses can be useful, but more to deter pests, such as aphids, rather than kill them. Anything with a strong aroma may help, as this will confuse some pests such as aphids (and cats for that matter!). Some gardeners report success with garlic, thyme, nasturtiums and marigolds - to be honest it is all a down to a bit of experimentation, but if it works it has got to be worth it!


The display at the Doagh Island visitors centre sends out a message to rose growers!

There is an idea that you could put mirrors, or other shiny things, under the plants. This is supposed to confuse the pests. We now have somewhere to put all of the free CD's that come in the newspapers!!

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aine
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i want to sow a climbing rose against my garage wall. as there is a concrete path there i am wondering would it be ok to sow in a pot? would i have to add new compost every year

thre rose woiuld be facing south west
thanks
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inishindie
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2011 10:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's well fed and watered in a large pot and fed every year with compost/well rotted horse muck etc it should be OK...Nothing beats being planted in the ground though....

Who said roses were boring....Here's our latest video... Taking rose deadheading to the MAX...MAX!!!!! MAX!!!!!!
....................

http://youtu.be/VQlrmQjPJhU



Gardening is FUN"!!

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 9:45 am    Post subject: GROWING GREAT ROSES Reply with quote

Áine,
With great respect and humility, have you read Inishindies's original post at the the top of this thread? Roses need six hours of 'sunlight' per day and prefer morning sun if they can get it. May I take it your garage wall allows for this? They dont like to have their roots dried out, and in nature send a very deep tap root to ensure a water supply

With great respect and humility to Inishindie, you may need a mighty pot. Roses in the natural environment develop a wide light root system mostly near the surface and out to 3 or 4 feet from the stem. This means that mulching with stablemanure is very effective in the autumn. I can't see how to mulch them if they are contained in an 18" diam pot. But I may be totally wrong here and would welcome constructive [or destructive lol] criticism, which will improve my knowledge base as well.
WallToAll

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inishindie
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good points walltoall...I was thinking BIG here with a pot the size of half a barrel..(or a full one) They do have long roots too as you find out when they are dug up...I remember uprooting hundreds of them when I worked for the council. It seemed a pity at the time but it was time for a change..They had been in the park for 120 years!
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 7:54 pm    Post subject: GROWING GREAT ROSES Reply with quote

Howdy Inishindie What I was thinking of suggesting to Áine was hire a jackhammer (or a gardening contractor?) and go through the concrete where she wants to plant the rose. it would solve an amount of future problems.
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aine
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks a million for the advice
i think i'll plant something else in the pot.
don't think my husband will be too happy if i mention a jackhammer! the path is less than a year old. hindsight is great, i wish i had left a space to sow something now!
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 5:54 pm    Post subject: GROWING GREAT ROSES Reply with quote

Áine,
I hope you didn't think I was being sarcastic when I mentioned "jack-hammer" to Inishindie. A jack hammer is a precision instrument in the hands of an expert (like me? Twisted Evil ). I would have used my jack hammer to punch a neat hole through the concrete at the point I wanted to plant the rose. A hole no more than 6 to 12 inches in diameter, but going through til it hits soil. I'd have cleaned up the hole down to about 18" and filled it entirely with horse manure. Then in Spring, I'd choose my rose, bare-rooted or potted and drop it into it's perfect new home. During next year it would send down that infamous tap root to locate a water supply. Next Summer I'd have my roses.

Such an arrangement would work fine on a south west facing wall especially if you chose a RAMBLER rather than a climber. Ramblers go OUT. Climbers go UP. When you see a beautiful olde worlde cottage with a wall all covered in roses, 9 tinmes out of ten it'll be a RAMBLER.

Get that husband of yours in on this discussion. Make that hole. Plant that rose. It'll be the makin' of yourself, himself, the garage and your future. Cool

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