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Ladybirds - Where are they???


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foxroxks
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lol i know its tiny............if i could figure out my new camera i would have gotten a better pic of it. on the up ive seen many more since ive taken the pic........must be all the sunflowers will def be keeping the seed from them 4 next year
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Sarah Evans
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Location: Cork, Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2009 5:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am with walltoall, great fun had with spot the ladybird.

Sarah

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Garlicbreath
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Location: Wexford

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whew, thought I'd spotted my first Harlequin but it turned out to be an eyed ladybird!


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Eyed Ladybird
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forest flame
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 10:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

great shot i have just found this post about ladybirds and as many others they do seem in short supply this year. having said that i find there are not as many greenfly about. strange.
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mothman
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know a year has elapsed since last update to this thread, but it seems appropriate to update thread with a finding of a Harlequin Ladybird in Ashford Co. Wicklow

Found indoors on 4th Nov 2010. Origin unknown. Either made its own way in, or was amongst fruit and veg. The record has been submitted to Invasive species Ireland.
Keep on look out and report sightings to National Biodiversity Data Centre
http://invasives.biodiversityireland.ie/harlequin-ladybird/

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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 10:30 am    Post subject: ladybirds and harlequins Reply with quote

Right gardeners! Very Happy

MothMan has given us a couple of brilliant shots of the 'infamous' Harlequin. Razz Help him (MothMan that is! lol) and his colleagues at "bio-diversity". Watch out for this little fellow. BUT DON'T KILL HIM. He's not an enemy to gardeners. In fact he a super-efficient aphid hunter that unfortunately will also eat other ladybirds. Keep tabs on the pictures (maybe bookmark or favourite the page but protect MothMan's copyright) for the next year or two so as to be able to identify and report. Observant gardeners can be of great use to scientists by being pro-active in stuff like this. (Proactivist = busy-body)

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Last edited by walltoall on Sat Apr 30, 2011 11:04 pm; edited 1 time in total
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catman
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, I saw a yellow ladybird with black spots in my garden today. First time I've ever seen one. Are they common?
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 11:10 pm    Post subject: Post subject: ladybirds and harlequins Reply with quote

Hi Catman
Ladybirds although USUALLY red with black spots can vary in colour from yellow through orange and sometimes come "colour inverted" as in black with red spots. There are scores of possibilities and they can have as few as two spots and as many as 11. 7spot are the most usual. Yellow and orange ladybirds are relatively rare but only because the usual ones are so common. if that makes sense?

Separately if the ladybird watch is swinging into action I can report light but persistanty populations around my garden not TOO much aphids but I do have a badly infested plum tree. (Michael Brenock has told me about tar wash for next winter).

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Sive
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been surprised by the numbers of ladybirds I have seen this spring......I thought the hard winter might have affected them more. I leave my herbaceous beds to die down naturally over the autumn and winter, thus giving food and cover to birds and insects, so I think the ladybirds hibernated deep in the dried-out foliage of perennials and grasses.
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Garlicbreath
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I, too, have been surprised by the number of laydbirds around. They've been cleaning up a whitefly-infested basil plant Smile However, I've also noticed an alarming lack of bees! Lots of bumblys but that's about it. Is it a bit early?
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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 12:27 pm    Post subject: ladybirds lunching and bees buzzing Reply with quote

Yo GarlicBreath, the honeybee is entirely dependent on a supply of nectar and pollen, so by definition it comes into it's own once flowers are blooming. My honeysuckle is only just breaking into flower but the fuschia is being doggedly slow this year. Having said that I have numerous bumblys of various sizes visiting every day.
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Garlicbreath
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Walltoall, I live very close to a river with a steep bank that is completely swathed in blooming gorse. Usually, on a still day the whole bank seems to buzz and scintillate with bees adn other insects. This year there is total silence. Very disturbing. I also have poached egg plant and wild garlic in full bloom and a big patch of bugle - lots of hoverflies (and ladybirds) but no bees.
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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 1:28 pm    Post subject: Ladybird breakfasts and bees buzzing Reply with quote

Oh! Dear I was afraid you were going to tell me that, GarlicBreath. There's a serious shortage of honey-bees due to a rampant virus. Have you local bee-keepers or do you depend on 'wild' colonies? PS I was a bee-keeper in my youth but developed an anaphylactic reaction to bee-stings. However, I love bees always have done. "A swarm of bees in May is worth a load of hay. A swarm of bees in June is worth a silver spoon and a swarm of bees in July isn't worth a fly".
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hitbit
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2011 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Foxroxks,
Could you let me have some info on the flowers you have which are successfully attracting bees and also the material, design and method used in your ladybird houses

Hitbit
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hitbit
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2011 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Sarah.
We were thinking of getting ladybirds from mrmiddleton but your post is of concern. I was wondering if you also bought their ladybird houses and if not did you build your own.

Hitbit
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