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How to revive your lawn after the rain.


 
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 3:43 pm    Post subject: How to revive your lawn after the rain. Reply with quote

How to revive your lawn after the rain.

How's your lawn looking after all the rain?
If your lawn is currently, or was recently waterlogged it will have a pale green or yellow colour, this is due to a lack of oxygen reaching the grass roots. Like many other plants, grass requires a balance of sunlight, water, nutrients and oxygen. In a waterlogged situation, this balance is skewed, with excess water within the pores of the soil reducing the amount of oxygen and nutrients normally available to the grass.

Waterlogging is often a direct result of soil compaction, where soil particles are packed so tightly that it is virtually impossible for water to find its way down through the soils surface. One of the most common causes of soil compaction that I have come across within lawns, is when the area is trafficked whilst still wet.

Keep off the grass.
So, my first piece of advice to those of you who wish to have a decent lawn after a wet spell is to keep off the grass. Most plants, grass included can cope with a period of wet, but will struggle badly if their air supply is damaged by a big foot or mower tyre. Please try not walk on or drive a ride-on lawnmower across the wet lawn because this aggravates compaction, leading to the waterlogging, followed by weakened grass, then an invasion of opportunistic mosses and weeds.

Bide your time, dryer weather will arrive eventually, the lawns surface will dry, then long grass can be gradually taken down in height over three or four successive mowing spaced at three days apart.

Aerate.
Aerating your lawn on a dry day is another way to relieve waterlogging and aid the revival of your laws health after a prolonged wet spell. Aeration creates channels that greatly benefit the grass, ending your yellowing by allowing air, nutrients and water to pass throughout the soil. Small areas of grass can be aerated by driving a garden fork into the lawn to a depth of 6 inches at regular 6-inch intervals, rocking the handle lightly back and forth, as you do so.


A trailed core aerator, photo / pic / image.

However, this method can become quickly tiresome if you have a large lawn area to aerate. For large aeration projects, visit your local hire shop where you should be able to hire a petrol-powered core aerator. Whether aerating manually or by machine, I advise you go over the entire lawn in one direction first, and then go over in another direction that is perpendicular to what you have just done.

The recent rains will have encouraged the growth of moss within the lawn; this will have to be dealt with as well. Why not combine the application of a moss killer with the addition of a lawn feed to both remove moss and green up the grass. Have a look in your local garden centre for a 3 in 1 lawn feed, weed and moss-killer, which is ideal for this purpose.

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bigdawg
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very helpful - thanks.

I noticed a lot of yellow grass and thatch in my lawn after the recent rainy spell. I figured i had been overfeeding it but i now think it was due to the extra rain, as you said, "due to a lack of oxygen reaching the grass roots".

its only a small lawn so i will begin aerating it with a pitch fork at the weekend.
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bigdawg wrote:
Very helpful - thanks.


No problem.

bigdawg wrote:


its only a small lawn so i will begin aerating it with a pitch fork at the weekend.

Enjoy. Your lawn surely will. Smile

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