Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Herb growing in Ireland

Oregano: Joy of the Mountain


 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2152
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2007 8:24 pm    Post subject: Oregano: Joy of the Mountain Reply with quote

Oregano: Joy of the Mountain
By Gwen Stewart

Known as "joy of the mountain," Origanum vulgare is commonly called culinary oregano or Turkish oregano. Oregano is a close relative of marjoram and is also known as pot marjoram. Similar in taste to marjoram, oregano's taste is more pungent and has overtones of mint.

Greek oregano, subspecies hirtum of O. vulgare, is recommended as the best type of oregano for cooking. Oregano is a half-hardy perennial that can be grown outdoors as an annual or indoors as a perennial.

Blooming in early summer, Greek oregano has pink, white, or purple flowers, dark green opposite leaves that are highly aromatic, and slim, squarish, woody, branched stems. Greek oregano has a branching taproot and grows in a clump. Used the world over in Italian, Mexican, and Spanish dishes, Greek oregano is one of the three essential ingredients in Italian cooking along with basil and marjoram.


Origanum vulgare commonly called culinary oregano plant, photo / pic / image.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Origanum
Species: O. vulgare

Greek oregano grows 24 inches (60 centimetres) tall.
Cultivation requirements: does best in light, rich, well-drained soil; requires full sun and a sheltered location; do not overwater and allow the top 1 inch (2.5 centimetres) of soil to dry-out between waterings; pinch off flowers to keep the plant bushy; do not over fertilise.

Need materials?
Irish home delivery.

Need materials?
UK home delivery.

Need materials?
US home delivery.












Buy young plants or take cuttings to propagate, as the flavour and aroma of oregano started from seed may be disappointing. Start new oregano plants by layering stems from existing plants. Pin down the stem, cover with soil, and keep moist until you see new growth. Transplant new plants to pots or their new location.

Greek oregano requires at least 5 hours of sunlight a day. If you are growing oregano on a windowsill, turn frequently to ensure that all sides receive equal amounts of light. Oregano can also be grown under fluorescent lights. Hang lights 6 inches (15 centimetres) above the plants and leave on for 14 hours a day.

In the garden, plant oregano with broccoli to deter the cabbage butterfly. It is a beneficial companion to all plants, improving both flavour and growth. Oregano can be grown in pots in the garden as well as in the soil. In the kitchen, use in pizza, tomato sauces, pasta, hearty soups, omelettes, cold bean salads, marinades for meats of all kinds, cheese and egg dishes, and bland vegetables such as zucchini, green beans, eggplant, potatoes, and mushroom dishes.

Oregano blends well with garlic, thyme, and basil. Oregano butter can be poured over fish and shellfish just before serving or baking. Oregano has a strong flavour so use sparingly and add during the last 10 minutes of cooking.

To harvest, pick small sprigs as needed. Oregano can be stored by drying. To dry, cup off plants 1 inch (2.5 centimetres) from the ground, tie plants into bunches, and hang in a warm, dry, shady location. After leaves are dry, strip off and store in an airtight container.

Gwen Nyhus Stewart, B.S.W., M.G., H.T., is an educator, freelance writer, garden consultant, and author of the book The Healing Garden: A Place Of Peace - Gardening For The Soil, Gardening For The Soul and the booklet Non-toxic Alternatives For Everyday Cleaning And Gardening Products. She owns the website Gwen's Healing Garden where you will find lots of free information about gardening for the soil and gardening for the soul. To find out more about the books and subscribe to her free Newsletter visit http://www.gwenshealinggarden.ca

Gwen Nyhus Stewart © 2004 - 2005. All rights reserved.

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.


Last edited by James Kilkelly on Wed Mar 10, 2010 1:51 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Adrian
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 29 Aug 2007
Posts: 2
Location: Naas Co.Kildare

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2007 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have got six herbs in small pots what can i do to keep the plants alive until spring in-doors. Thyme,Basil, Coriander,Rosemary,Parsley and bayleaf
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2152
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2007 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First of all make sure that the plants will have good drainage and do not sit in water.
But also check your indoor herbs regularly to see if they need watering. They should never be allowed to become bone dry.
Check is the herb pot-bound, ensure that the container size and the plants are compatible.
To aid steady growth keep the pot weed free, remove deadheads and trim the leaves back. Herbs should be fed through their leaves or the soil every two weeks during the growing season, so now you should be easing off as their growth rate slows.

Basically If a herb looks sorry for itself, check if it needs water, or feeding and whether it is standing in a draught or not receiving the correct amount of light.

Just so you know Basil, Coriander and Parsley are grown as annual herbs, so they may not do well for you next year. They are usually replaced.

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.


Last edited by James Kilkelly on Sat Aug 01, 2009 1:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Onion11
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 10 Jun 2008
Posts: 2
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2009 4:17 pm    Post subject: Flowering Oregano Reply with quote

Hello,

Planted a small herb garden with lovage, parsely, mint, basil, lemon basil, and oregano last year. the ONLY thing that appeared was the oregano which is thriving.
I remember reading somewhere that you are not supposed to let it flower if you want to use in cooking etc.
Back from holidays and it's flowering a beautiful purple, but wonder is there really any problem with using/eating oregano that has flowered, or indeed if the flowers themselves are edible!

Many thanks,

Onion.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sal
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 15 Sep 2008
Posts: 266
Location: kerry

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

oregano deters cabbage butterfly,
thats good to know,they ate all my greens i planted last year and i didnt try this year,but now will give it a go with oregano as a close friend
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Liparis
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 23 Sep 2007
Posts: 651
Location: Co. Meath

PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2009 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would imagine that the reason for not letting the oregano flower is because flowering would take most of the nutrients away from the foliage and reduce the amount of foliage produced. I would see no problem in using the flowers and eating them, whether they would add taste or be bland, I don't know, but they would certainly add some colour to your salad.
Bill.

_________________
Earth is the insane asylum of the Universe.

http://www.species-specific.com/orchid-forum/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
breezyacre
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 07 Mar 2009
Posts: 163
Location: Drogheda, Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to the "artist formerly known as GPI" for the excellent article on oregano. Just reading between the lines and thinking that plants should be layered every year to produce fresh plants for the following summer. Is this a correct assumption. If so is this the same for other herbs which produce woody stems after a while like thyme and rosemary.
_________________
Is ar scáth a chéile a mairimid
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Herb growing in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2017 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)