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Garden and wildlife photography tips/ tricks


 
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shefra
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PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 10:54 am    Post subject: Garden and wildlife photography tips/ tricks Reply with quote

Hello, Verge here.
This topic is a response to JennyS and her wonderful Irish wild flower photos here offers you free access to a wealth of horticultural information. Lots of you out there gave your photography tips, so I have moved them here to be joined by further tips and camera recommendations.
This topic begins where shefra asked what type of camera JennyS uses.

Enjoy.....


shefra asks.....
JennyS, what brand of digi cam are you using? Great graphics.
.
.
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JennyS
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PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2007 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Shefra
The camera I've got is a Fuji Finepix 10, but I've never done any photography before so I'm stumped on the technical terms! You only see the good bits of the photos - I reckon maybe 1 in 10 of what I take are ok, and then I crop them down a lot. (And use Photoshop, which makes a big improvement)
I haven't seen Derek Mooneys book, but one I use a lot is The Wildflower Key (revised edition 1996) by Francis Rose and Clare Reilly - really good illustrations and not too scary to use!
Really looking forward to seeing some of your photos - and would be delighted to add some to the website.....The aim is to try and show as many of Irelands wildflowers as possible, and help is needed!

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crosseyedsheep
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2007 9:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The camera I've got is a Fuji Finepix 10, but I've never done any photography before so I'm stumped on the technical terms! You only see the good bits of the photos - I reckon maybe 1 in 10 of what I take are ok, and then I crop them down a lot. (And use Photoshop, which makes a big improvement)


I like the photos Jenny, I'm not familiar with your camera but check the manual and see if there's a macro setting, this will allow you to take close ups and focus at the same time, it could hopefully give you a better yield.

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JennyS
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PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2007 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ooops I think my reply just disappearded - next try - I use the macro but shaky hands is some of the problem, and windy days don't help either! Maybe I should try a tripod?
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crosseyedsheep
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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2007 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I use the macro but shaky hands is some of the problem, and windy days don't help either! Maybe I should try a tripod?


I have a Sony Camcorder which has a "steady shot" feature, my Canon dig camera has something similar, it can be turned off on both and it makes a huge difference. Maybe there's a similar feature on yours which isn't activated?

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Last edited by crosseyedsheep on Mon May 21, 2007 9:57 am; edited 1 time in total
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foamcutter
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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2007 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jenny,

From what i've read, using a tripod and macro setting are good for up close and detail shots............. saying that yours are very good. It might help improve the

Quote:
maybe 1 in 10 of what I take are ok

so that it might only take 1 in 3 or 1 in 5.
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JennyS
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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2007 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I pretty much always use the macro, but ihaven't got an Image Stabiliser. What puts me off using the tripod is that a lot of the photographs are of low-growng flowers, and to get them in the viewfinder using a small tripod would mean having to lie flat on the (often) very wet and muddy ground......!
If I can ever afford it I'll have to get another camera as this one has been dropped which probably hasn't helped.
Change of subject - it would be great to see some other peoples pictures, hint, hint!

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Gardensgalore
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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2007 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jenny,
back to your shaky hands prob. with photos, why don't you use a 'pocket tripod'?

Find a small bolt to fit into your camera tripod mount (1/4" BSW for the techies i.e old type roofing bolt) and attach a long loop of strong twine to it.

When you need to steady a shot, stand with both feet in the loop and pull the camera gently against the resistance of the twine.

It really works, but stopping the twine from tangling in your pocket can drive you crazy....Just look at me, LOL
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Stan_D
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jenny,

camera shake can be overcome by changing to manual (or semi manual) mode and selecting a high shutter speed. This is good for photographing detail as a high shutter speed reduces the depth of field hense blurring the background. Just need to make sure that the autofocus is locking precisely onto the subject matter.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

even a monopod will help reduce shake considerably, and is a bit easier to manhandle than a tripod.
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mdvaden
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

JennyS wrote:
Ooops I think my reply just disappearded - next try - I use the macro but shaky hands is some of the problem, and windy days don't help either! Maybe I should try a tripod?


My Canon takes care of most of the shakiness, but I learned one trick for focus - may or may not be relevant for many cameras.

I place a green box over something at the distance to focus, but if its textured, or something at a different distance is in the box, sometimes it blurs.

So if I'm doing berries or flowers, sometimes I'll place a solid object like a small sheet of wood or my hand in front till the camera focuses at that range, then pull the temporary object and take the image.

Seems to get me twice as many decent photos.

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JennyS
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2007 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that tip - I've tried it a few times now and it definitely seems to help....except for the times when I've forgotten to remove my finger after focusing and ended up with a nice sharp photo of a grubby gardeners fingernail....
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