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Veg in Modules


 
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Micks Garden
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 11:24 pm    Post subject: Veg in Modules Reply with quote

Sometime back (early summer I think) there was a discussion on growing Carrots in mod trays or maybe buying seedlings in mod trays from garden centers . Anyway what ever it was I can't find it now, after reading I decided to do an experiment with carrots and parsnips in mods.
The trays were size: 45 x 48 x 115mm , the seedlings were removed as soon as they had reached the bottom of the pot and planted out in the garden , attached see the parsnips.
These were planted out in mid June, see where the fork starts that's about the depth of the mod tray so any restriction of the taproot fec's the plant's progress .
Growth was retarded , roots were no more then 2" long and a little less across and all the forks made them useless . I also did Celeriac and they fared much the same . The carrots were destroyed by carrot fly and I disposed of them early on, they were forked at about the same level .



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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 5:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carrots and parsnips should be sown in their growing place from the start. Very difficult to transplant due to the fibrous nature of the root. The only hope you would have is to really carefully transplant the whole plug and even then it's only a chance that you get it right. Parsnips are really difficult to grow from seed and have a low germination rate. You must have read about this idea somewhere else as i don't remember it unless you were looking at an old thread. I would have thought that the celeriac would have been alright but have no great experience of trying that.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am still amazed that garden centres stock carrots and Parsnips in modules I have mentioned it to them (That is Employees) they don't care money makes the world go around.......... There is always a sucker to buy these things.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This year I bought modules of celeriac and celery - just to try them. I did plant them in the 'salad bed' separate from the main garden. They both transplanted OK and so far have both grown OK. The celery is not fit for salads - too tough and bitter, but juices well. The celeriac is growing but won't be anything like the monsters you get in the shops.

Apart from the physical constriction of a module container carrots, parsnips and especially celeriac need moisture if the root is to swell to any size. They are not going to get that in a small container. But then, you know that now! Very Happy

BTW some of my carrots have split this year - but they juice up just fine. I made up a juice last week that consisted of tough celery, split carrots and the stalks of curly kale, all 'waste' veg. It was great! Bit late now for your stumpy carrots, but a thought if you have any less than perfect veg (mind you I would draw the line at juiced parsnips, yuk)

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Micks Garden
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sue Deacon wrote:
The celeriac is growing but won't be anything like the monsters you get in the shops.

I planted Celeriac seed directly into the garden the few in the mods were for the experiment, the seed sown directly has produced roots 3 times the size of those started in mods.

Sue Deacon wrote:

Apart from the physical constriction of a module container carrots, parsnips and especially celeriac need moisture if the root is to swell to any size. They are not going to get that in a small container. But then, you know that now! Very Happy

The seeds were only started in the mod trays and planted out to the garden as soon as roots were visible at the bottom.

The experiment was just to prove that root veg wont grow on well from mod production.
So the main results were badly forked plants and retarded growth , most only reaching one third the size of those sown directly in to the soil .
I will do a White Paper on it later . Very Happy

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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're into experiments, Mick, some people start carrots by filling a length of guttering - eave shutes round here - with fine soil or compost into which they plant their seeds. As soon as the seedlings poke their tops through, a drill is drawn in the main garden so that the contents of the guttering can be slid off into it without disturbance, and the carrots left to grow on and mature.

Logically, I don't see why the same method shouldn't work for any crop, including things like peas and beans, but one distinct advantage is that the initial sowing can be done in comfort on, say, a bench in the shed where the tiny seeds are much easier to handle, and better spacing can be achieved to avoid thinning. I've known about this for years but have never tried it for myself.

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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
If you're into experiments, Mick, some people start carrots by filling a length of guttering - eave shutes round here - with fine soil or compost into which they plant their seeds. As soon as the seedlings poke their tops through, a drill is drawn in the main garden so that the contents of the guttering can be slid off into it without disturbance, and the carrots left to grow on and mature.

Logically, I don't see why the same method shouldn't work for any crop, including things like peas and beans, but one distinct advantage is that the initial sowing can be done in comfort on, say, a bench in the shed where the tiny seeds are much easier to handle, and better spacing can be achieved to avoid thinning. I've known about this for years but have never tried it for myself.
I have done that with peas. It can also give them a head start in bad weather and stops them being nibbled/dug up by birds, mice and slugs.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good one. I might try it myself next year.
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