Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Garden Stones


 
Most Recent Posts Hello
Last post: Sue Deacon
What is this plant please
Last post: Sue Deacon
Amelanchier
Last post: Good guy
Prime Seaweed (Availability) Conditions?
Last post: Gautama
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 839
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:51 pm    Post subject: Garden Stones Reply with quote

A chap I don't know inherited a local farm and engaged the services of someone I DO know to help get it organised. Chatting to the helper on his way home from the farm, he was moaning about having to pick huge quantities of stones out of the soil. His point was that it makes sense to remove large stones, but that the smaller ones should be left in place as they help to keep the soil warm. This has been bugging me as I've always thought of the ideal soil as being good, loamy and stone free, but it also occurs to me that a warm stone will lose its heat slower than soil. Having never even considered this before, is there any value in maintaining a level of stone matter in garden soil?
_________________
A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
Posts: 1673
Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sat Jun 24, 2017 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stone helps will drainage but it's a well known fact that it doesn't matter how many stones you remove from land, there are always more that work their way to the surface to replace them! Laughing

Seriously, stones do help prevent compaction of the soil and aforementioned drainage (ooh, that's a big word for a Saturday night).

_________________
Plant Trees, Save Lives
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gautama
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 29 Aug 2008
Posts: 171
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael Viney in the Irish Times is an advocate of stones present for heat retention.
I think much depends on the size of plants. For example, seeds require no stones whatsoever.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 839
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The presence of stones will also affect crops like carrots and parsnips, whose roots will be deformed if they hit a stone. Certainly for parsnips, I use a crowbar to make quite a deep, straight hole and push any stones to one side. By then filling the hole with friable soil or compost, before planting the seed on top, I sort of guarantee the root will grow down straight and this is a trick used by exhibition growers to produce perfect examples.
_________________
A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2181
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Smaller stones are good for soil, leaches minerals, helps heat retention, etc. Oliver Schurman is a strong advocate of them.

If you have any nice-looking big boulders, I'll take them. Smile Smile

_________________
.
.
.
.
A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2017 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)