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Gathering your own horse manure


 
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mange tout
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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 8:55 am    Post subject: Gathering your own horse manure Reply with quote

I managed to source some horse manure from a friend, but I suspect the horses, used for riding and jumping, are probably dosed

It occurs to me that my mother in law has about half a dozen Connemara ponies on a few acres in galway. They're not broken in and are fed almost exclusively on the land. I'd say they're rarely dosed.

How feasible would it be for me to walk the fields with a wheelbarrow and gather the dung? Is this realistic or do you really need a concentration of horses in an area (ie stables) to make manure production feasible? If I was to gather it how would I go about leaving it to decompose? Does it need to be protected from the elements? Do I need to add straw to get the balance right?
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vincent71
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PostPosted: Sun May 21, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject: horse manure Reply with quote

Hiya, ask first if the horses are dosed. Depends on how much you need. It will be a lot easier to organise a tractor and trailer to pick and deliver a load to you instead of collecting in a bucket around a field.
If it's covered from the elements there will be a lot less leaching of nutrients which will be washed out if uncovered.
Let it break down as long as possible so there's no manure smell and it's friable in your hands and dark in color.

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Blowin
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the other hand, if you know which part of your plot you're going to use it on, put it straight on it and leave nature to do the rest?
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Mon May 22, 2017 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A couple of years back a friend bought me a link box full of donkey poo from his donkey - Wexford (I kid you not). I put most of it around my old apple trees. It 'burnt' the long grass and weeds around the trees and slowly rotted down into a lovely, friable mulch. The first feed the trees had had in about 60 years! They loved it. Very Happy

The following spring I put the remainder on the roses. The donkey is 'dosed' against worms etc but nothing to worry about and certainly nowhere near as bad as some of the weed killing cxxp that some of us gardeners use. Wink

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mange tout
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PostPosted: Sun May 28, 2017 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suspect it'd take a long time with a wheelbarrow and shovel to gather enough dung to create a bags worth of broken down manure. Certainly not time efficient. But I'm still tempted. The holistic circle type side of it appeals to me.
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Gautama
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've heard that most horses are dosed for gut worms and this is in the manure, where it goes on to kill earthworms. I dunno how true this is. I use cattle manure and it's full of worms.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 11:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Equines are not dosed on a regular basis and the stuff leaves the system fairly quickly. If you know of their management you can avoid any problems there might be. Works for us anyway. Our earthworm count is on the up - there were practically none in our garden when we first moved here. Wish I could say the same for ladybirds and lacewings - their count is still zilch.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If there were six ponies in a field, I'd buy six wheelbarrows and tie them onto the back of the ponies, like carts. The ponies could then fill up the wheelbarrows themselves. Lead the ponies back to your garden and untie the now full wheelbarrows. Job done! Smile Smile Smile
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vincent71
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Picked up two van loads of well rotted horse manure this week from the farmer next door. Absolutely chocker block full of worms.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ Lady Fermanagh. What is the midge count?
@ KS. You need a carthorse not a pony.
@ Vincent. Sounds like you done very well for yourself there.

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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 14, 2017 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Happy to report midge count is down on last year - fewer places for the little blighters to hide.
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