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Ant problem


 
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vincent71
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 7:17 pm    Post subject: Ant problem Reply with quote

Hi folks, has anyone dealt with ants before as they have moved into the compost heaps and into one of the vegetable beds.
Previously I poured the powder on the nest or some petrol and set it alight. I'd rather not do this to the veg bed or heap. Any info ?

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boiling water or proprietary ant traps. They are a nightmare in a greenhouse.
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Keeks
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leave them...they dont do any harm in the garden and can be a benefit by eating caterpillars. In a compost heap they will help areate the heap.

If you have them on n a greenhouse then i would also you have an aphid problem....get rid of the aphids first
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They cause root damage in the greenhouse.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Tue May 02, 2017 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I gave up growing carrots in my garden in England because of ants. I'd sow the seeds in nice rows and the (very) few that came up were all over the place. Plus I flare up something rotten to an ant bite. I'm afraid it's boiling water from me.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What do you call it when ants run away together? Antelope
What do you call an ant that wont go away Permanant
What do you call a poor ant? A peasant
What do you call an ant who likes to be alone? An independant
This is sad!!!!!!!!!!!
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If, as Keeks says, you do have an aphid problem, boil up some rhubarb leaves, strain off the liquid, put it in a discarded household trigger spray, and spray them with it. Then watch them fall off.
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vincent71
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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ive been bitten all over my legs. Boiling water it is.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vincent71 wrote:
Ive been bitten all over my legs. Boiling water it is.
Ouch!
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Keeks
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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
They cause root damage in the greenhouse.


Curious....i am interested to know what and how they are causng damage....my understanding is that they should only cause damage if the nest is there.

Also @Sue I would be interested to know how they damaged you carrots.

This info may change My thinking on things....

Below is that info fro the RHS

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=503

Quote:
    Ants can cause concern but they are a nuisance rather than destructive pests.
    They feed mainly on insects, including other ants
    They also collect the sweet liquid known as honeydew, which is excreted by aphids and some other sap-feeding insects
    Ants can protect aphids from attack by ladybirds and other predators in order to secure their supply of honeydew. Increased numbers of aphids may result in more damage to plants
    They do little damage to plants themselves, except by disturbing soil around plant roots and depositing it on the surface during their nest building activities. This can be a nuisance on lawns and where low-growing plants are being buried by excavated soil
    Some ants (mostly Myrmica species - commonly known as red ants) can sting, but for most people this is no more than a minor irritation


Now I am not a new age hippie or a person of the earth but i do belive in balance in a garden. Everthing is there for a reason, just need to find out why and if it is friend foe or a symptom of a another problem.

So if i saw ants in my greenhouse i tend to ignore the ants and find the reason they are there i.e have I got an aphid problem. No point in spending time getting rid of something only for it to reappear beacuse i also didnt get rid of the teason why they were there in the first place.

Either that or I introduce a "predator" to "control" the problem

Nice video on what Brinng balance to an eco system can do.

https://www.facebook.com/newsnercom/videos/810945719072741/
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They didn't 'damage' the carrots. The answer lies in the piece you quoted ' disturbing soil around plant roots'. Their nest was under the flagstone path alongside the veg bed. The carrots (those that germinated) were all over the place. Rolling Eyes

The damn things also 'farmed' any aphids on my plants, protecting the little buggers from anything that tried to eat them.

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