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Native American Diaries...


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Geranimojess
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Joined: 22 Jun 2010
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Location: N/W Sligo

PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ado 2 wrote:
A bit sexist. Its tough enough work hunting i would say. Fishing mmm not too bad but you still have yo catch something for the dinner .... ( tongue in cheek ).. keep up the good work G. Love the American Indians.



Thanks for the encouragement...nice to know others share my passion... back in that era every Tribal Member had a Job to do just to survive...it never came down to picking / choosing if it needed to be done it was done...

This is as regular a Day to both Male and Female as you would get in any Tribe...

Typical Women's work....

1...Cooking-Skinning and cleaning the Animals-gathering Fruit and Nuts-building the Fire and Smoking Meat to be stored for the Winter...
2...Crafts-making Baskets-weaving Cloth-preparing Animal Hides-making Clothing...
3...In many Tribes Women were responsible for Harvesting Crops, men might help but generally it fell on the Women.....they also raised the Children and if a Tribe was moving it was the Woman's Job to pack up the Tepee and set it up in the new location...

Typical Man's work...

1...Men were in charge of Activities away from Home...Primary Job was Hunting and Fishing and providing for his Family...he was also responsible for protecting the Village and Property.....making Canoe's and Tools and Weapons...
2...In most Tribes the Men were Political and Religious Leaders and also undertook heavy work such as building Permanent Homes and Planting Crops...some worked making Ceremonial Jewellery...


1...The Women were in charge of the Home and in some cases actually owned it and the contents...
2...Women were well respected in the Tribe for their hard work and for providing Food from the Farming...
3...Men and Women had different roles but generally speaking women had equal rights...In some Tribes the Chief was a Man but elected by the Women...
4...Today...2017...25% of all Native American Tribes that are recognized by the Federal Government are led by Women...

On a finishing Note....


Only when the last Tree has died, and the last River has been Poisoned, and the last Fish has been caught...will we realise that "We cannot eat Money"
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're expecting plain English out of GJ it could be a long wait!!!!
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Geranimojess
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Joined: 22 Jun 2010
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Sue Deacon"]
Ado 2 wrote:


My favourite eatery The Happiness Trap, in Enniskillen has a Navajo prayer on the wall - beauty before me, beauty beside me, or words to that effect. It's lovely. Very Happy

Looking forward to hearing more.




Hope this is the one your talking about...there are several similar Prayers much longer than this one and heavier to digest so I'll let you off with the short one...

"In beauty I walk"...

With beauty before me I walk...
With beauty behind me I walk...
With beauty above me I walk...
With beauty around me I walk...
It has become beauty again...
It has become beauty again...
It has become beauty again...
It has become beauty again...

That is a closing Prayer from a Navajo Blessing...
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2017 7:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is similar but not the same. Wish I could remember it, I must write it down!
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Be humble, for you are made of earth
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2017 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If anyone is ever passing through Middleton. Co Cork take a few minutes to stop and view the Memorial erected to the "Choctaw Nation" in appreciation for the Donation they made back in 1847 of $147 { 4,083 in todays Money} towards the Irish Potato Famine Relief Fund...

The "Choctaw" had their own serious problems at the time but still were able to help others...did you also know that ex President Mary Robinson is an Honorary Chief of the "Choctaw Nation" ...
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Geranimojess
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Location: N/W Sligo

PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Marias Massacre of 1870...

On Jan' 23rd 1870 the US Army Massacred over 200 Natives in Montana following the Murder of Malcolm Clarke a White Trader...Clarke was supposedly killed by a Warrior named "Owl Child"...The US Army led a Campaign to attack the Mountain Chiefs band of "Black Feet" Warriors who were accused of hiding "Owl Child", instead the Army attacked a peaceful Tribe who were under the protection of the US Government...

The Army attacked the Camp while it was unprotected as most Men were out hunting, killing 173 Women and Children and Elderly Members...140 more were captured and later released without Food-Clothing-Horses and made to walk to Fort Benton 90 miles away ... during that walk many more Froze to Death....


Ute Prayer...

Don't walk behind me...I may not lead...
Don't walk in front of me...I may not follow...
Instead walk along side me that we may be as one...
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some questions I'm often asked...some of the answers may surprise you...

1...What is an Indian Reservation...

Land that is set aside for the Native American by the Government...

2...What are the Laws on a Reservation...

Reservations are governed by the local Native Government...each Tribe has their own Laws-- Police Force and Court system...Federal Laws {Laws of the US Government } apply on all Reservations but State Laws do not....

3...Are they part of the United States...

Sometimes a hard question to answer...while Indian Reservations are a part of the United States, they are in some ways their own Nation with their own Governments...they deal with the US Government on a Nation to Nation level,at the same time they must observe Federal Laws...

4...Who actually lives on Reservations...

The majority of People on Reservations are Native Americans who belong to that local Tribe...as of the last Census in 2012 approx' One Million Natives are living on them...this is less than half of the estimated 2.5 Million that live in the US...

5...How many Reservations are there in the US...

There are approx' 326 Reservations taking up 56.2 Million Acres...sounds a lot but it's only 2.3% of the entire Country...the largest is the Navajo Nation with 16 Million Acres in Arizona--Utah and New Mexico...many are much smaller...the smallest Reservation preserves the Cemetery of the "Pit River Tribe" on just over 1 Acre...

6...Treaties...Laws...Relocation's...

Most Reservations were established through various Treaties between the Government and local Tribes...more times than not the Government would break the Treaties and take back the Lands they had earlier promised to the Tribes...in the 1880's many of the Eastern Tribes were forced to relocate to Lands in Oklahoma {Tornado Alley and one of the poorest States in the US}...

7...life on a Reservation today...

Life on a Reservation today is very difficult...many of the People are living below the Poverty line...high Unemployment---high Crime rates--Drugs---and very poor Housing conditions...Some Tribes are trying to improve conditions by building Gambling Houses and Souvenir Shops to try and attract Tourists but they don't see behind the Scenes...

8...Preserving Native Culture...

Much of the Native Culture has been lost, however Tribal Elders are doing a lot to reverse that flow and are involved in classes Teaching Languages... Ceremonies...Dances and Traditional Stories...


A few interesting facts...

1...Not every Tribe recognized by the Government has it's own Reservation...

2...The land set aside for Reservations may or may not be part of the land where the Tribe originally lived...

3...There are 566 Tribes officially recognized by the Government...

4...There are 90,000 Native Families Homeless at the last Census...

5...25 States have Reservations...California has the most with 121...










































































..
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 29, 2017 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beginning to get mildly interested in this. It is surprising what one doesn't know yet when one starts reading about a topic how interested one can become.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My mum has an interest in 'Indian' history. I've read her copy of 'Bury my heart at Wounded Knee'. I think it's worth a read.

Isn't that where the phrase 'Indian givers' comes from? To be given something worthless and then, if it is found to be worth something, to have it taken away again.

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Good guy
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This has been a fascinating read. I'm looking forward to more, GJ.
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
Beginning to get mildly interested in this. It is surprising what one doesn't know yet when one starts reading about a topic how interested one can become.



No attempts to convert anyone here...these Comments and Statistics are purely for Informative purposes and if you enjoy reading them I'm a happy Bunny... Job done.
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Geranimojess
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Location: N/W Sligo

PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sue Deacon wrote:
My mum has an interest in 'Indian' history. I've read her copy of 'Bury my heart at Wounded Knee'. I think it's worth a read.

Isn't that where the phrase 'Indian givers' comes from? To be given something worthless and then, if it is found to be worth something, to have it taken away again.




Spot on Sue with your explanation about "Indian giver"...I have a Library of Native Books including "Bury my Heart" so if your Mum fancies a read there would be no problem arranging that...If She looks at DVD's I also have a selection of Films made on Reservations and CD's of very relaxing Native Music...goes great with Incense Sticks.................She will be as high as a Kite...... Confused
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good guy wrote:
This has been a fascinating read. I'm looking forward to more, GJ.




Thanks for that GG...a little encouragement goes a long way...makes the sore "Finger" worth it.......... Laughing
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2017 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Native American Tepee's....

Tepee's were the Homes of the Nomadic Tribes of the great Plains...It was built using a number of long Poles as a Frame...the Poles were tied together at the Top and spread out at the Bottom to make an "upside down" Cone shape...it was then wrapped with a large covering made from Buffalo Hide...

When the Tepee arrived at a new spot , the Women of each Family would set up and build the Tepee...building a Tepee was very efficient and typically only took about 30 mins to set up...

In the Summer the covering {Buffalo Hide} would be raised to allow for a large gap at the bottom...this gap enabled cool Air to flow through the Tepee and keep the inside cooled...In the Winter additional coverings and Insulation such as Grass were used to help keep the Tepee warm...In the center a Fire would be built... there was a hole at the Top to let the Smoke out...The Buffalo Hides were also used for their Beds and Blankets and Wrap-around's to keep warm.................


Other Native "Homes" also include "The Longhouse" and "Pueblo's" more on these later...
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2017 12:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I first entered a teepee in Calgary I was surprised at how spacious it was. Such a great piece of economical design, nothing wasted in that world.
Looking forward to your pueblo accounts. I really like the way the buildings ore of the earth and seem to grow from it: a bit like my aunt's cob house in Devon. The pueblo people made/make some damn fine pottery, too. For obvious reasons, pottery wasn't much use to nomadic tribes.
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