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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

What to plant.


 
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Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2901
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2017 5:23 pm    Post subject: What to plant. Reply with quote

The weather is now very mild 13 degrees today.
You could start topping the grass and put on lawn feed and moss killer.
Time to start forcing the Rhubarb by covering with bucket or something fancy if you have the money.
Sow Onion seed inside now
Finish off pruning the roses.
Cut back all your perennials and mulch the beds.
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FionnG
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 26 Apr 2016
Posts: 53
Location: Tipperary

PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2017 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there,
Does forcing rhubarb make them grow faster?
I have a rhubarb in the polytunnel and it grows perfectly.
Fionn.

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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 854
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 6:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The principle is, FionnG, that, as soon as the growth pokes through the surface, its main aim is to absorb sunlight. By putting some sort of cover over it, it uses all its root power to shoot up faster than usual in an attempt to find it. So, you get an earlier crop and the sticks tend to be very tender because of the speed at which they've grown.

In the North East of the UK there's a prime rhubarb growing area where the commercial growers dig up their roots, some weighing half a ton I'm told, and move them into large sheds where they keep them in the dark and maximise the crop.

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FionnG
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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Joined: 26 Apr 2016
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Location: Tipperary

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok thank you for your reply.
I Will get a metal/plastic bin and put it ontop,
Of the rhubarb tomorrow.
How often should I water the rhubarb if I do that?
And how long do you keep it covered for?
This is my plants 3rd season.
Thank you,
Fionn.
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Sue Deacon
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Joined: 31 Dec 2014
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Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
In the North East of the UK there's a prime rhubarb growing area where the commercial growers dig up their roots, some weighing half a ton I'm told, and move them into large sheds where they keep them in the dark and maximise the crop.
You can HEAR them growing! There are soft popping sounds as the leaves unfurl.

I just put a large bucket or pot over one plant. It does take a bit out of the plant so I cover a different one each year. I don't usually water as there is usually enough rain. But all the plants (5, 3 very old and 2 new) get generous dollops of well rotted donkey poo.

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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 854
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sat Jan 21, 2017 6:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

By the time cropping season comes round, I'm told the rootstock already has what it needs (a bit like a charged battery) and it's this that enables the big growers to lift their huge roots out of the ground altogether. In fact, I usually pile compost etc. on top as soon as the foliage dies back at the end of summer and this feeds it over the winter. I'd be very surprised if any Irish soil needs watering at this time of year but there's no harm done if you take your cover off to check for growth, then put it back, but don't forget that you're applying unnatural pressure on your plant, so it's best to leave it off altogether once you've enjoyed a first feed or two of 15-16 inch sticks.

Put a note in your diary for 1 September to apply nutrients?

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