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David B Mitchell
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 11
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 8:53 am    Post subject: Hi all Reply with quote

Hi all

Just a quick hello, look forward to chatting with you all. I'm new to gardening and my main focus is organic fruit and veg.
The more I learn the more I realise I know nothing ha ☺ still though I'm really enjoying it
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kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 10 Nov 2008
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Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi David.

Welcome along. And don't get put off by any banter here. Smile

I'm not into fruit & veg myself. I had 8 apple trees for quite a few years and in the end I just couldn't get rid of all the fruit to neighbours so they went. Others here are, though. (Thank goodness.)

Kevin.

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Sue Deacon
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Joined: 31 Dec 2014
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Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 3:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello David,

Welcome to IG. Please feel free to jump in any time.

I've been doing this gardening caper for 40+ years - and I'm STILL learning! I've been an 'almost' Organic gardener for years, but am starting to see organic as the only way to survive. I'd be interested to hear about your approach and what you are growing.

Whereabouts in the West are you?

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David B Mitchell
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 11
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sue Deacon wrote:
Hello David,

Welcome to IG. Please feel free to jump in any time.

I've been doing this gardening caper for 40+ years - and I'm STILL learning! I've been an 'almost' Organic gardener for years, but am starting to see organic as the only way to survive. I'd be interested to hear about your approach and what you are growing.

Whereabouts in the West are you?


Hi Sue, I'm in Galway. A complete beginner I'm afraid with nothing yet but I'm hoping a polytunnel raised bed setup will keep me organic if I'm vigilant.
Im still doing my research and will be starting the new season as a blank slate
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Sue Deacon
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Joined: 31 Dec 2014
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Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you seen the recent post on watering (a polytunnel), nice or what?

You'll need to cultivate friends with horses and/or chickens! I took it as a compliment when an old gardening friend said I was 'worth my weight in 'oss muck'. Laughing

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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi David, welcome to the forum. No shortage of nuts on here and none of them is called Hazel! But seriously, I think one of the best things about gardening is that there is always more to learn. The other best thing is that a garden is never finished!
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tagwex
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Joined: 23 Feb 2010
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 8:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only one nut on here and he is called Tagwex.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 853
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, David! And again, welcome. Yesterday you wrote 'I'm hoping....' which suggests you've nothing done yet, so could I recommend you spend these inhospitable winter days, not just planning WHAT you'd like to do but WHY you're choosing the various options. The size of your plot will have a goodly bearing on what you do, of course, but being in fashion with tunnel and raised beds may not be the best route. After all, Mother Nature is the most 'organic' and doesn't use either. Good luck.
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David B Mitchell
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 02 Nov 2016
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
Hi, David! And again, welcome. Yesterday you wrote 'I'm hoping....' which suggests you've nothing done yet, so could I recommend you spend these inhospitable winter days, not just planning WHAT you'd like to do but WHY you're choosing the various options. The size of your plot will have a goodly bearing on what you do, of course, but being in fashion with tunnel and raised beds may not be the best route. After all, Mother Nature is the most 'organic' and doesn't use either. Good luck.

I do love the idea of growing outdoors but I thought a tunnel would be easier manage pests and disease and weather and the beds would give me good soil I can control. More research for sure
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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
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Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nothing wrong with your logic but consider greenhouse versus tunnel. A tunnel needs to be above a certain length to be economical, i.e. any tunnel will have its two end sections which are the most complex and thus the most expensive. The more hoops you put in between, the cheaper cost per metre of your tunnel? The obvious way to site it will be east/west so that the sun will hit it side on - but that will leave the northern side shaded by taller crops like tomatoes and cucumbers etc.

If you feel able to build your own greenhouse, you can design it with the ridge off centre and towards the north side. The big south side will be used for crops. The smaller north side can house all the bales of peat, wheelbarrow, canes etc. that most people clutter up their greenhouses with.

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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome, Do join in and don't mind the others slagging each other I think they are related at this stage, Unfortunately not many stay here too long as they get upset by some of the advice and bored quickly. So don't be shy and post lots even contradict what is said we love debate.
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David B Mitchell
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 11
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2016 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
Nothing wrong with your logic but consider greenhouse versus tunnel. A tunnel needs to be above a certain length to be economical, i.e. any tunnel will have its two end sections which are the most complex and thus the most expensive. The more hoops you put in between, the cheaper cost per metre of your tunnel? The obvious way to site it will be east/west so that the sun will hit it side on - but that will leave the northern side shaded by taller crops like tomatoes and cucumbers etc.

If you feel able to build your own greenhouse, you can design it with the ridge off centre and towards the north side. The big south side will be used for crops. The smaller north side can house all the bales of peat, wheelbarrow, canes etc. that most people clutter up their greenhouses with.


Sounds good, what is the difference between a polytunnel and a greenhouse, sorry for the newbie questions
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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 853
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 6:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because you live in the (extreme) West of Ireland, I've no doubt wind is a regular feature in considerable quantities. To install a tunnel properly the hoops will probably need to be concreted in to prevent them loosening with continual wind buffeting. Whatever the ads say, I think you'll be lucky to get 10 years out of a 'skin', at which stage you'll need to re-excavate the trench you buried the bottom in, before renewing another sheet of polythene. Glass or clear corrugated plastic, the latter being my preference, coupled with a well made frame will last much longer. I roofed a small shed with plastic in the UK and only had to re-do it once in 31 years.

GreenHOUSE also implies that the shape will resemble a normal house with walls and sloping roof, which means it can accommodate guttering to collect rainwater into a tank inside. Quite what the effects of heavy rain are on a tunnel set-up, I don't know, but an inside tank will mean a hose plus tap can be fed through into the growing area from which to fill watering cans.

To expand on the idea will involve an essay, so I'll stop there, but there are good plastic materials on the market to use for framing (rotproof) and, as Tagwex says on a regular basis, 'Do it once and do it right'. If you need more info, David, we may have to revert to pm's so that I can forward drawings etc.

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kindredspirit
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kedar polytunnels are expensive but they are supposed to be "windproof."

http://www.kedergreenhouse.co.uk/

http://www.kedergreenhouse.co.uk/Hugh_FearnleyWhittingstall_Chef_campaigner_and_veg_growing_enthusiast_comments_on_how_his_Keder_Greenhouse_is_performing--post--56.html (Comment from River Cottage guy.)

Black Friday deal. http://www.kedergreenhouse.co.uk/Enthusiastic_Gardeners.html

Piccies of construction. http://www.kedergreenhouse.co.uk/A_customer_comments_on_building_a_Gardener_kit_greenhouse--post--36.html

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A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
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David B Mitchell
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Posts: 11
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks everyone for the replies, lots to think about 😊
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