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Clay Chiminea help.


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Dancer
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 10:55 am    Post subject: Clay Chiminea help. Reply with quote

I purchased a clay chiminea and I would love to use it as a planter but it needs
to be weather proofed and I have googled chiminea sealers but can't find anything that is available in Ireland . I don't really wNt to have to paint it with a weatherproof paint as I quite like the colour it is . Just wondering if anyone might have any ideas as to how to seal it so that I can leave it out as a planter .



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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Polybond would seal it but then it would be shiney. Sad Sad
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2016 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You wil also have to drill drainage holes in it as plants will drown in the winter !
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 4:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not an actual suggestion, but there is a liquid you mix with cement called a 'plasticiser' that is supposed to waterproof it. If all else fails this might do the job but I'd check with a builder first?
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would go with Blowins suggestion of plasticiser, or plas as it is known as in the plastering trade. Get the manufacturers details and inquire with their technical department first and explain what you are trying to do. You may need to dilute it first.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2016 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the dim and distant past I vaguely remember using a product called Water Seal on concrete. It is a water repellant and is only shiny if you use multiple coats. It should work OK on clay/terracotta. If it is designed to get hot it should have been high fired, which means it will have some frost resistance anyway.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2016 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i think the issue with frost is not so much the resistance to cracking due to heat, but that it might get wet, and then freeze - and as the ice permeating the chimenea takes up more space than the water which comprised it would, the expansion causes it to crack.
you can see it on brickwork sometimes after a heavy frost, it's called spalling iirc.
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Dancer
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks everybody for the prompt replies. I only paid 30 for it so It's probably not great anyway. The polybond sounds like a good idea as does the plasticiser . Would I be able to purchase just a small amount of these products do you think ?
As for drilling holes in the bottom , is there a chance that the whole thing will crack ? I want to put an evergreen trailing plant in the bottom part only as I want to leave the lid on the top. Any suggestions for a plant ? It will most likely be in the shade .
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 12:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:
i think the issue with frost is not so much the resistance to cracking due to heat, but that it might get wet, and then freeze - and as the ice permeating the chimenea takes up more space than the water which comprised it would, the expansion causes it to crack.
you can see it on brickwork sometimes after a heavy frost, it's called spalling iirc.

When clay is high-fired it becomes more resistant to moisture so more resistant to frost damage. Cheaper, clay pots are more porous. Wet a plant pot and see how fast the water soaks in. Then wet a frost-resistant one, the water sinks in much more slowly, if at all.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 12:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Use a drill bit designed for glass.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plant?

Maybe the small leaved yellow variegated Ivy. Bombproof and easily trimmed if it gets too rumbustious.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ivy will hit the ground very quickly and wil spread along the ground and root everywhere. What about a fern ?
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My experience of ivy is that it won't grow where you want it to, just everywhere you don't want it to!

Japanese Painted Fern is a beauty, very graceful. It is evergreen and the young foliage has a pink tinge.

I knew I had a pic somewhere. That's it on the left. It's planted by the pond now and looks great.



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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The kitty cat looks great too !
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's 'baby' Bob, my tripod cat. I resized the photo for another site and couldn't be axxed to do it again. Laughing
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