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Wouldn't have missed it for the world


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Margo
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Oct 2010
Posts: 1974
Location: Summerhill Mayo Ireland

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 11:50 am    Post subject: Wouldn't have missed it for the world Reply with quote

Yes, it really was like that.................

My mum used to cut chicken, chop eggs and spread butter on bread on the same cutting board with the same knife and no bleach, but we didn't seem to get food poisoning.

Our school sandwiches were wrapped in wax paper in a brown paper bag, not in ice pack coolers, but I can't remember getting e. Coli. Almost all of us would have rather gone swimming in the lake or at the beach instead of a pristine pool (talk about boring), no beach closures then.
We all used tie on roller skates, took PE, climbed trees ..... and risked permanent injury with a pair of Dunlop sandshoes instead of having cross-training athletic shoes with air cushion soles built in light reflectors that cost as much as a small car. I can't recall any injuries but they must have happened because they tell us how much safer we are now.

We got the cane for doing something wrong at school, they used to call it discipline yet we all grew up to accept the rules and to honour & respect those older than us. We had 50 kids in our class and we all learned to read and write, do maths and spell almost all the words needed to write a grammatically correct letter......., FUNNY THAT!!
We all said prayers in school irrespective of our religion, sang the national anthem and no one got upset.
Staying in detention after school caught all sorts of negative attention we wish we hadn’t got, and our parents wasn't given a week notice, it was immediate.

I thought that I was supposed to accomplish something before I was allowed to be proud of myself. I just can't recall how bored we were without computers, Play Station, Nintendo, X-box or 270 digital TV cable stations. We weren't!!

Oh yeah ... And where was the antibiotics and sterilisation kit when I got that bee sting? I could have been killed!
We played “King of the Hill” on piles of gravel left on vacant building sites and when we got hurt, mum pulled out the 2/6p bottle of iodine and then we got our backsides spanked. Now it's a trip to A and E, followed by a 10 day dose of antibiotics and then mum calls the lawyer to sue the contractor for leaving a horribly vicious pile of gravel where it was such a threat.

To top it off, not a single person I knew had ever been told that they were from a dysfunctional family. How could we possibly have known that?
We never needed to get into group therapy and/or anger management classes. We were obviously so duped by so many societal ills, that we didn't even notice that the entire country wasn't taking spam!

How did we ever survive?
LOVE TO ALL OF US WHO SHARED THIS ERA.
TO ALL WHO DIDN'T, SORRY FOR WHAT YOU MISSED. I WOULDN'T TRADE IT FOR ANYTHING!
AAAAh, those WERE the days
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Ado 2
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 15 May 2015
Posts: 1204
Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems like you were walking down memory lane today Margot. I remember walking in for lunch from school with my mother stirring in a big saucepan on the range, nappies they were, towelling nappies. She always joked that we were having nappy soup for lunch.
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Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
Posts: 2028
Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2016 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amen Sister! You're preachin' to the choir.

Here's one for you. A friend from childhood had post-natal depression with her second child. Ok, fine, that must be awful. She is STILL being treated for it and the lad is in his twenties!!!!. At one time she told me she was seeing a shrink (my word) who had 'helped her come to terms with her traumatic childhood'. Shocked She came from a happy, loving, close family! Traumatic? No it wasn't. The only trauma she suffered was teasing she received for being tall (aren't children wonderful, bless their little cotton socks) I got picked on for my mothers dress sense (I looked like a refugee) Rolling Eyes

My dear friend, Ray, says he can remember running home from school, crashing into the house to find his mum swatting chickens off the kitchen table, handing him a sandwich 'to keep him going 'til tea', then climbing a tree in the garden to sit and eat his butty. This was in rural Galway in the 1950's. He said, for all the livestock wandering into the house and all the unwashed hands, he never got so much as a cold!

We are too clean and scared of dirt these days and our soils are sterile wastelands. I watched, fascinated, one day as a mum with a small baby was sitting down for a snack in a supermarket cafe. She had cutlery in a bag (from home) and at least 3 different sorts of antiseptic wipes. She wiped the high chair, she wiped the childs hands, everything! I couldn't help thinking that, on the first day at school, some child might sneeze on her child and he would curl up and die.

When I see what my friends Teenagers are going through, getting grades and getting into the 'right' Uni, as if their lives depended on it......... I can just hear Maurice Chevalier singing 'I'm glad I'm not young anymore'. Laughing No, for all the deprivations of the past (you've not lived if you have never had to don wellies and a coat to trail across the yard to the loo at night) and only THREE TV channels. How DID we manage - very well actually! Very Happy

Oooh I'm getting quite worked up. Think I'll have to go lie down in a darkened room. Old Fart signing off.

Come on folks, more memories. Earliest gardening memories?

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Ado 2
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 15 May 2015
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Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My mother used to grow flowers in the garden and my dad did the digging for the veg. We went out with the bucket to dig the potatoes for the dinner. She grew lots of sweet William. My sister was going out with a fella called William. One day in the garden I was lying down beside the flowers stroking one, saying William , sweet William. She didn't like it one but. We laugh about it today. Ha . My mother at 84 still grows flowers and my dad has raised beds at 86
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Margo
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Oct 2010
Posts: 1974
Location: Summerhill Mayo Ireland

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the old days as they call it.
Going out onto the road with bucket and spade to pick up after the delivery horses
Mum had the flowers in the garden and Dad had the allotment. He used to keep his gun in an unlocked box on the allotment and shoot rabbits. So plenty of rabbit stew in our house near enough all free food. He also used to go shrimping and used to get loads and sell them to the neighbourhood. I loved afternoon tea with shrimps on toast.
There was no expensive days out. We walked everywhere and had lots of picnics. We used to go to the beach or go blubelling or primrosing. Sometimes bringing some bulbs or roots back for the garden. All of us would visit Nanny and Grandads grave and we would take a picnic with us then and have a lovely time with all the family together.
It was always wash day Monday. Mum did it all by hand and didn't have a fridge or a washer till the early 60's. She had an old copper to boil wash.
Lastly we all played out and came home either if we was hungry or the lights were on. We all sat round a table for meals with no telly or mobile phones just conversation AND we had to ask to leave the table. Just a few memories to be going on with.
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Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
Posts: 2028
Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm loving this girls. Wonder if the boys will join us?

Mum, (89 on Wed!) was never a gardener. My dad was a country boy, though his parents had no land he always spoke of the value of your own plot and, when we moved from our terrace to a semi with a big garden, the first thing he did was mark out a veg plot. It was dad that got me gardening.

Margo, your mention of your mum washing bought back so many memories. I had a toy wash-tub - 'just like mummy's'. Except I used mine to grow apple pips, two of which survived to maturity. I was 3 when dad taught me to sow seeds!

The other thing it reminded me of was mum's 'Harvest Festivals' (all is safely gathered in) hanging on the line. Laughing I remember feeling very depressed that as a girl I would have to wear all those flippin' layers of elastic and nylon. Glad to say I never did!

We lived on the edge of town and could see the 'Bluebell Woods' near Keele University. Dad would walk us up there on a Sunday morning, while mum mangled the dinner. She had worked as a nurse and a nanny and had always had 'Staff' to do the catering. Mum had a limited repertoire when it came to cooking.

Sometimes we would catch the buss to see my 'Auntie' Margery (mum's, dad's cousin!) A little bird of a woman with an infectious giggle and the ability to charm the birds out of the trees. She lived in an Arts and Crafts cottage with a massive garden. It was wonderful. It is Margery that really got me hooked on growing things. She was a wonderful woman. My gardening hero.

Come on fellas, let's hear from you - and don't say you are too young to remember copper boilers, mangles and only 3 B&W TV channels.

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Margo
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Oct 2010
Posts: 1974
Location: Summerhill Mayo Ireland

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We didn't have a telly till 1960. It was an enormous heavy thing. When we got married and got our first flat we rented our telly. Didn't have a colour telly till 1974. Telly wasn't on 24/7 as at first it was only on at teatime for childrens hour and it turned off at 10 and there was always a white spot on a black screen. Mind you we hardly watched telly then as we was always out and about.

We had an outside loo and used to keep a candle in a flowerpot which supposedly stopped the pipes freezing as well as giving light. Bathtime was a tin bath in front of the fire and Mum used to warm our clothes on the guard by the fire. We used to wear those awful liberty bodices with rubber buttons and they used to get hot.
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Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
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Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oooh the outside loo! Was yours full of spiders too? (well it seemed so)

We had a cast iron bath in the kitchen, hidden away under a counter my dad built. On Fridays the kitchen became a bathroom! Laughing

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Ado 2
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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to clarify. I wasn't born until mid 60 s. But still have memories of our lack and white telly. My dad used to say we have colour. Black and white !
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Margo
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Oct 2010
Posts: 1974
Location: Summerhill Mayo Ireland

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Funny one is I used to go and visit my Aunt who lived in Surrey in the late 50's and her next door neighbour used to boast about their colour television. It was a huge TV with a funny coloured screen in front of it.
I expect there was spiders out there Sue but spiders or any kind of insect has never worried me.
Birthdays and Christmas we only ever had one present on Christmas Day and Boxing Day we used to have tea and there was a small pressy then. Usually a packet of sweets or some soap. Our parents couldn't afford much more and we respected that and didn't expect more. Not like the thousands that are spent nowadays.
Rainy days we played tents , with a blanket over the table, jigsaws or reading. But we had to help Mum in the house. We had to clean our own bedrooms and help with preparing veg ( thats where my love of raw veg comes from) plus cooking and I brought my children up like that, as they did also. My Grandchildren went to school being able to cook cakes, roast dinners etc only being held back with kids that didn't even know how to boil water.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ado 2 wrote:
Just to clarify. I wasn't born until mid 60 s. But still have memories of our lack and white telly. My dad used to say we have colour. Black and white !
Well I'm not THAT old myself (very) late 50's. Laughing

Auntie Margery started a family tradition we still do today (both me and little sis). She once gave us a Christmas box with a label 'do not open 'til Dec 24th. She got the date wrong, but we STILL have a Christmas Eve box with goodies for the day, like a nice Port or some special coffee. Everyone contributes something and we open it together after tea on Christmas Eve.

It was my dad that taught me to cook - he used to do the most fabulous Sunday roast. I just remembered something that I probably shouldn't say, but it WAS funny. We only had booze in the house at Christmas - a bottle of sherry. Early one February dad, noticing there was a drop left, said to mum, 'finish this off sometime, then we can throw away the bottle.' Later on, mum had dropped me at school and was on the way home through our local park when she got chatting with the park keeper, a family friend. Little sis kept pulling at mum's arm, when she finally said 'what's the matter?' Judy said 'come on mum, lets go home and finish the sherry.' Laughing Laughing Laughing

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Margo
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Oct 2010
Posts: 1974
Location: Summerhill Mayo Ireland

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 12:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely story Sue. Well I don't care who knows but I'll be 70 in June. I'd rather have had the childhood, teens and the rest when I did. We tried to carry on with the old traditions with our kids and grandchildren. I hope our 8 Grandchildren will pass them on to our 5 Great Grandchildren.
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Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
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Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll second that! And, OK, I was 57 last month, there I've said it! (sob) and getting more like a delinquent teenager every year. Laughing

I hope I'm still causing mayhem in my 90's, like Margery. I had a batchelor uncle who kept an eye on the old girl.. He called around one day and she didn't answer the door. The curtains were closed and a neighbour was called to climb a ladder and try to peep in through the gap in the bedroom curtains. SHOCK, HORROR, a lump in the bed. The police were called, they broke down the (very large oak) front door. Just then Margery got off the buss with her shopping, walked past the stunned uncle, neighbour and two policemen, smiling she said 'well hello everyone, fancy a cup of tea?' and climbed over the remains of her front door without further comment. They don't make 'em like that anymore - the aunt, not the front door.

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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

April 1st, 1943 was the day the world changed - I entered it, so Margo have a bit of respect for your elders and, as for you, Young Sue .....

Wartime Britain. Dad invalided out of the army. Electricity (light only) arrived in '47, the year it snowed on Christmas Eve and didn't thaw 'til May. All cooking done on a Valor paraffin stove until 'rocket science' in the shape of a Calor Gas stove arrived. One cold tap only in the house until '63. I was 22 before we had a 'Rediffusion' rented TV - Mum wouldn't have one in the house until my sister and I had both left school (too tempting a distraction for homework) . It was, like the rest of you, black and white and my Dad had it still when he died in '98.

So, my Mum would have been 108, Dad 104, now but I think we ought to rejoice in the improvements to women's lives over those days. You've mentioned coppers for washing but I recall my Mum saving the tea leaves to scatter on the living room rug (no carpet) which were then swept up with an energy sapping stiff brush so that dust had stuck to them. No Hoover until an early model cylinder model arrived, but it had one advantage that's been lost today. The hose was pushed into the end for use, but, if the fire wouldn't go, you could ram it in the other end and it would blow better than any bellows - beat that Mr G-Tech Airram.

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Sue Deacon
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Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2016 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the chat Blowin. Young Sue - I like that. Very Happy

Was your Rediffusion TV operated by a switch on the wall - I never understood that?

That winter you mentioned, my mum and her friend hiked 10 miles or so from Leek to The Roaches (Bit like marching over the Burren) in snow so deep it almost covered the telegraph poles - and she says I do daft thinks!

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