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Pisonous plant in the garden this month


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I read somewhere that the Dent de Leon (lion's tooth) refers to the shape of the petals, the way they are square-ended with a little indentation. Seems this is like a lion's tooth, though as I've never put my head into a lion's mouth, it's only hearsay!
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

At least we learned a lot from the post ! Thanks
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Next pisonous plant Ilex aquifolium our native holly, berries are pisonous berries are nice for christmas decorations, but they are poisonous to people and pets. Swallowing holly berries can cause vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, and drowsiness. Children have had symptoms after swallowing as few as two holly berries.Holly leaves are said to also cause symptoms if eaten but, because they are prickly,they are usually left alone.
Treatment may range from simple observation at home to a trip to the hospital for activated charcoal and, perhaps, intravenous fluids. if your dog or cat eats berries look for signs of Lip smacking, Drooling , Head shaking, Vomiting , orDiarrhea. Innteresting observation check out your holly tre note lower leaves are very prickly while those higher up are smoother, this is to deter browsing animals. Dangerous place the garden???
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was going to plant bare root around my parents rural house but didn't because I read sheep will eat it and there are sheep next door . Is it not poisonous to sheep then ?
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Margo
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="medieval knievel"]
Blowin wrote:
I amazes me round here, at the terrible lack of knowledge we grew up with.


We remember when living in UK OH was picking lovely juicy blackberries from the hedgerows and popping them straight into his mouth. A group of lads aged about 18-20 went by and saw him doing it. They said your not supposed to do that their poisonous. OH said no they are not poisonous they are lovely juicy blackberries. They replied well aren't you going to wash them first.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've had those comments when picking bilberries - some folks don't know what's good for them. Laughing Sad really.
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, there's clean dirt and dirty dirt!
Where children are concerned, my dictum has always been: 'dont eat it unless you see me eating it'. So far, so good!
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You cannot plant bare root Holly.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
You cannot plant bare root Holly.
Did try once - hopeless!

If I had my time over again (and I wasn't such a dummy when it comes to the sciences!) I would love to have studied the history of medicinal plants and pharmacology, it fascinates me. So many of our everyday medicines come from plants that with a tweak become deadly poisons (and vice-versa)?

Mistletoe is poisonous but experiments on mice have shown it inhibits malignant growths.

I liked the Sean Connery film Medicine Man. There is SO much we don't understand about the common plants around us. A cure for all cancers could be growing in our lawns.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2016 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I planted them elsewhere and they were fine ( bare root holly) are they poisonous to sheep ?
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is an ascertained fact that travellers vessels, made in Gaul of this wood, for the purpose of holding wine, have caused the death of those who used them.
Pliny the Elder, from Naturalis Historia, ca. 77 AD (Taxus baccata, Yew)

More on the toxicity of wood.
http://www.wood-database.com/wood-articles/wood-allergies-and-toxicity/
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember reading a story of Ancient Greeks who 'entertained' some people they weren't too fond of to dinner, with kebabs on skewers of yew. Is it from the Illiad, perhaps?
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tippben
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Holly berries are poisonous to sheep, but they don't eat them. While at college in the UK we had to monitor the sheep flock. There was lots of Holly about, and knowing that it was toxic, and having to account for poisonous plants seen on the legally required daily check sheet, I discovered that no sheep had ever died at the college from ingesting holly or yew, though two had once died from ragwort. A field had been mowed, but the cuttings weren't collected due to weather. That destroys the compounds in ragwort which animals naturally avoid, making it edible, but still toxic. Some sheep broke out because somebody didn't shut a gate properly, and...

The only reason cattle, horses, or sheep would get poisoned by a plant is A) by evolutionary selection. There will always be one eejit. 2) Ignorance and/or bad land management, as in the above example. 3) Bad husbandry and neglect. The animals will eat anything because they are starving/hungry.
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you , that is very interesting
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 04, 2016 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I spent a lovely holiday on Inishbofin in the late 70s. The meadows were full of wildflowers and were mown by scythe. I saw a boy walking the meadow before it was cut, pulling ragwort by hand and removing it.
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