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Gardening Invention Idea


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Scandinavians are good at ergonomic tools. They've developed some excellent ones for the seafood processing industry - boning pliers etc. Can't remember offhand the names of manufacturers as I stopped looking at all this stuff when I retired.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really wigtax, as if I would impunge your intelligence! As far as I can see, your only intellectual disability is your apparent inability to see that it really is better up here.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm going to be a bit more basic but these are two items I've already (shed) made for myself but you're welcome to them if they're any good?

Dibbers are used for making holes in the soil, into which seedlings etc can be planted. They are a hand tool, as opposed to a powered one.. My hands are about 2'6'' (75cm) above the soil but the average dibber is only about 12" (30cm) long, which means that every time I need to dib a hole, I'm bending my back to do so.

Via my local forge I obtained a 3' (1 metre) length of 16mm steel rod. The man there hammered a point on to one end and bent the top 5" (125mm) at right angles to the main stem so that I finished up with a walking stick looking item @ a cost of 8. The 16mm gauge was just what he had available, but isn't vitally important - could have been 18mm etc. For my own satisfaction I covered all bar the bottom 12" (30cm) in shrink wrap tubing and placed a short length of black polyxxxxx water pipe on the handle to make a more comfortable grip.

I can now walk down a row making a succession of holes without bending my poor old back and, although it's not that heavy, wiggling it to and fro will usually make it sink in by its own weight. Having satisfied that basic need, I also use it in particularly dry weather for dibbing deepish holes beside such things as cabbage plants so that I can feed water down below the surface where the plant needs it, without spraying the whole area and encouraging weed growth too. I use the same process for applying nutrients - again selectively.

Also on the dibber theme, have you ever noticed that they are invariably round in section, whereas the plug of compost in seed trays is, by definition, square or rectangular? In a bored moment I took a length of square timber, shaved down the four sides to create a pointed (but square) end, drilled a hole through the top and inserted a spare length of copper pipe to form a sort of T-handle. When planting out what I think are delicate plants, I now have another back-friendly dibber that will make square holes, into which my square plugs of root bearing compost will fit nicely. By gently pushing a little bit of side soil around them, the job's done and the root stock is left undisturbed.

As I say, I have two dibbers but, if one of the clever types can suggest a way of combining both into one, bingo? But it's not a bad idea anyway?

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Easy to make two dibbers in one by using a short length (to save weight) of box iron combined with a movable long length rod inside it. Both then pegged or clamped together.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great ideas, both. KS, a sketch would be useful!
Could a measuring stick be combined with a dibber?
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 17, 2015 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quite. KS, OK, it was Hobson's choice but I'm quite satisfied with my 16mm circular dibber which is a nice weight (for me). The square section one is roughly 2in x 2in and, as long as I haven't misunderstood what you mean, the combination idea would be clumsy and extra heavy?

The idea was really for Edlyn12's school project which started this thread.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not to forget one of the most valuable Design Mottos: KISS

Keep
It
Supremely
Simple
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always thought KISS was "Keep it simple! Stupid."

Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are right there, KS, that's the phrase we used. But then GG is far more polite than us (well me anyway). Wink
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Polite? I don't think so. But as a teacher I tried never to make my students feel stupid.

I can still hear clearly the voice of Fusty Hazelett: "You're thick, S......, you're thick." I can also remember deciding to pay no attention to what he said as I resumed my sketches of a design for a boat. I forget whether it was a maths class or history. He wasn't much good at teaching either subject.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ehhh your mathematical prowess has been well documented here and now we know the reason why..... designing boats indeed whilst that poor teacher was trying to educate you.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a great name for a teacher. Sounds like one who was slightly ecentric. What was his real first name?

We had a teacher in Physics who was nicknamed "Erg". He went ballistic when we'd agree with something he said and the whole class went "erg! erg! erg!" We were extraordinarily cruel to our teachers, I remember. Not proud of it now but it was the done thing then.

There was a statue in the middle of the quad of Dominic Savio (or some name like that). One morning we came into school and found that someone had painted white footsteps on the tarmac from the statue to the toilets and back. All privileges were suspended for ages after that but no-one ever owned up.

Another time we made a bonfire in the middle of the Art Classroom. We had to crawl out on our hands and knees because of the smoke. But not to be deterred, myself and another lad crawled back in again and put out the fire before the art teacher came back. We wuz tuff lads! Smile Smile Smile

Another time, the headmaster went looking for me because I wasn't in class. I strolled in for the next class having partially disassembled and reconstructed a Vespa scooter behind the sixth form smoking room. I put a Lambretta front mudguard on the Vespa. (Yes! Sixth formers had their own smoking room in those days!). When he queried where I'd been, I just said "to get some fresh air" or something like that. He never said another word to me! I'm not tall but I was looking down at him.

We got up to even worse shenanigans than that but I'd say you wouldn't believe me. Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Twisted Evil

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh I would, you know! I never knew that teachers first name - would have known very few, in those days. Mostly Mr, the occasional Mrs, a Dr and a few Revs.

As for designing boats as an educational activity, I can hardly think of a better one - displacement, complex curves in geometry, sectional drawings, ergonomics, spatial organisation etc, etc.

Maybe this would be a good thread for the depths of winter when other topics are few on the ground: "miss-spent schooldays", or "things we did to teachers."
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a teacher called Messy Mansfield. A roaring alcoholic. Another was Q. Another was Zebedee. Another was Spiro. The list goes on.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2015 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I went to an all girls school and most of the teachers were 'Miss'. We had two male teachers, Mr Clark, (English) and Mr Hanford (Art). They were lovely, I remember them both with fondness.

I did Art at A'level and got into college on the strength of being one of 'Joe's Girls'.

My maths teacher, Miss Hancock was a dead-ringer for Joyce Grenfell. I remember her wailing at me 'I don't understand why you don't understand'. Laughing

I think it's a great idea for a winter thread. All our teachers were larger than life characters.

The only 'gardening' I have done this week is to check on the new pond and the tea house each day. So far so good - neither of them have come to any harm! But I did think I would find the fish swimming up the path!

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