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Langedijk Cabbage


 
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 10:37 am    Post subject: Langedijk Cabbage Reply with quote

As this topic had piggybacked on to another one, perhaps it would be best to publish the following separately. Thanks to Ado 2, and not being able to translate the Ukrainian site, I found three varieties of this alleged 'super cabbage' on the Gardens4u site which is in fact an offshoot of a Dutch firm. I asked for information and they sent me the following.

"Langedijk the most popular variety for making coleslaw. Taking approx 120 days to reach maturity, this fast maturing tasty red cabbage early variety is suitable for long-term storage.
Sow the seeds for seedlings in March or directly into the ground from the mid-April or May. You can harvest them in late autumn .
I have added the care instruction below, it may be of some help to you.
Plant the seeds in late spring in seedbed in open ground. Cabbages do best in a sunny location with reasonably firm soil. They do not do well in very acidic soil; if your soil is acid then apply lime during soil preparation. For best results dig in plenty of well-rotted manure or compost the autumn before planting time (this must be done months before planting). Sow seeds 1.5cm deep, rows should be spaced 15cm apart. After germination has taken place, thin out seedlings to 10cm between each plant. Transplant to their final position when the plants are approx 10cm high and all danger of frost has passed, space approx 50cm apart.
I have looked on the internet about storing cabbage. Please see below:
Storing cabbage correctly is important to preserving its quality. Proper storage methods will help to slow down the "breathing" of the cabbage. This is important because the faster the cabbage "breathes", the quicker the cells metabolize and the cells' metabolic processes begin to break down, and the sooner the vegetable begins to spoil. Therefore, to preserve its flavour, colour, texture and nutrients, you need to slow the metabolic rate.
Refrigerate. Chilling the cabbage slows its rate of respiration. At 59°F (15°C), both red and green cabbage give off carbon dioxide at a rate of 32 millilitres per kilogram per hour. Chinese cabbage breathes at a much faster rate. Keeping the cabbage cold will also help to retain its vitamin C content.
Keep it wrapped. Wrapping cabbage in plastic* and storing it in the crisper section of your refrigerator limits its exposure to air flow, and thus reduces respiration and retards spoilage. Just as importantly, plastic wrap keeps external moisture out, preventing mould and rot, while helping the cabbage to maintain its internal (cellular) moisture—without which, the cabbage leaves lose their firmness and begin to wilt.
While plastic wrapping does help to preserve the quality of the cabbage, it does carry some concerns. Plastic residues from the wrapping have been found to migrate into food at refrigerator temperatures and even though the residues are in very, very small amounts, they still must undergo detoxification by the body.
Convenient alternatives to plastic wrapping include reusable, tightly-locking Tupperware-type plastic containers or Pyrex-type containers with rubber or plastic gaskets, both of which should be closely matched in size to the head of cabbage.
Handle with care. If you need to store a partial head of cabbage, cover it tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Since the vitamin C content starts to quickly degrade once the cabbage has been cut, you should use the remainder within a couple of days. Also, handle cabbage carefully to prevent bruising. Any kind of cell damage degrades vitamin C content.
Some plastic vegetable storage bags have tiny air holes, and do a better job of reducing surface moisture and air flow, and minimizing spoilage. Better still are the ones that absorb the carbon dioxide the cabbage expires, dramatically improving storage life. But plastic alone will not prevent loss of vitamins, which is why chilling is also necessary.2

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Keeks
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 14 Apr 2012
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 10:51 am    Post subject: Re: Langedijk Cabbage Reply with quote

Very Interesting...might give it a go


Blowin wrote:
and not being able to translate the Ukrainian site,


you can try using Google translate....not 100% accurate but you will get the gist

https://translate.google.ie/?hl=en&tab=wT
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Ado 2
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 15 May 2015
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Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey thank you for all that very interesting information. Very helpful
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4167
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 10:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey what are we doing in perennials ferns and grasses?
Jaaaysus where did you here about this super veg Blowin, not one accreditation, tut tut.
E-mail - apg@ukrpost.ua
WEB - www.agrogroupa.com
E-mail - mail@ukrseeds.net.ua
WEB - www.ukrseeds.net.ua

The option to translate comes up within the web page. Do not rely on google translate.

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Blowin
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Joined: 20 Aug 2008
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Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2015 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, Guv. Forgetting me manners, Guv. I 'hered' it from Tagwex.
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Ado 2
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2015 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How could we forget about Tagwex !
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2015 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You will all go to hell.
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“It’s my field. It’s my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!”

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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