Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices

Organic aphid spray


 
Most Recent Posts funny
Last post: tagwex
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Ado 2
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
Keith g
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 09 Mar 2012
Posts: 67
Location: Cavan

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2015 7:59 pm    Post subject: Organic aphid spray Reply with quote

Hi folks, has anybody got a recommendation for using an organic spray for the elimination of aphids and greenfly?

The buggers are all over my dahlia seedlings despite my best efforts

Thanks,

Keith..

_________________
"Stars are the golden fruit of a tree beyond reach"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4162
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2015 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Washing up liquid at 10%, let the the little buggers have plenty of foam.
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2015 5:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boil up some rhubarb leaves, strain the liquid off when cold, put it in a discarded household trigger spray off e.g. window cleaner, thoroughly washed out, and spray them with that. Watch them fall off.
_________________
A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Keith g
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 09 Mar 2012
Posts: 67
Location: Cavan

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2015 7:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Reply with quote

Ah thank you folks, I'll try both methods Very Happy

I'll separate my seedlings and see which works best

Keith.

_________________
"Stars are the golden fruit of a tree beyond reach"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
Posts: 1296
Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2015 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Both those work well, or you could try a solution of soft soap (if you can get it). For larger plants and shrubs such as roses you could try my friends trick - breadcrumbs! She sprinkles them on the leaves, it attracts Blue Tits. When they have finished the breadcrumb starter, they move on to aphid maincourse. It must work - she never has aphids!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4162
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2015 10:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now that's clever.
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Keith g
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 09 Mar 2012
Posts: 67
Location: Cavan

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2015 4:38 pm    Post subject: Re: Reply with quote

+1 yeah that's really clever !!

Keith..

_________________
"Stars are the golden fruit of a tree beyond reach"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2746
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2015 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

why oh why are we trying to kill everything, Why are they on your dahlias what conditions exist that encourages them, why not introduce some ladybirds to the plants there are lots around at the moment, Whats this organic pesticides, Pesticides are non discriminatory wheather its greenfly, or ladybirds,

"A recent study compared the effectiveness of a rotenone-pyrethrin mixture versus a synthetic pesticide, imidan. Rotenone and pyrethrin are two common organic pesticides; imidan is considered a "soft" synthetic pesticide (i.e., designed to have a brief lifetime after application, and other traits that minimize unwanted effects). It was found that up to 7 applications of the rotenone- pyrethrin mixture were required to obtain the level of protection provided by 2 applications of imidan.

It seems unlikely that 7 applications of rotenone and pyrethrin are really better for the environment than 2 applications of imidan, especially when rotenone is extremely toxic to fish and other aquatic life.

It should be noted, however, that we don't know for certain which system is more harmful. This is because we do not look at organic pesticides the same way that we look at conventional pesticides. We don't know how long these organic pesticides persist in the environment, or the full extent of their effects.

When you look at lists of pesticides allowed in organic agriculture, you find warnings such as, "Use with caution. The toxicological effects of [organic pesticide X] are largely unknown," or "Its persistence in the soil is unknown." Again, researchers haven't bothered to study the effects of organic pesticides because it is assumed that "natural" chemicals are automatically safe."
www.ocf.berkeley.edu
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
Posts: 1296
Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2015 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Again - breadcrumbs - the only danger there is GM wheat. Laughing

Besides, in my 16 years in this house I have seen only ONE ladybird! We just don't get them, or lacewings. We just have the 'munchers', aphids, weevils etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2746
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2015 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i find that hard to believe, We thought none here until kids went looking and collected 26.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sue Deacon
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 31 Dec 2014
Posts: 1296
Location: West Fermanagh

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2015 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If we have, they are very good at hiding!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 2356
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2015 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A balance of natural predators has to be the way to go. I'm encouraging as diverse a fauna as I can, using physical barriers where appropriate and trying to avoid anything else.
I'm interested in trying more of the Nemesis products - has anyone experience of their wireworm treatment? I found the slug one good - but then got a population explosion of baby snails! You really can't win.😫
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2746
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2015 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

James had an article on Wire worms, http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about1277.html
I assume these are imported and not native I wonder the effects they would have on the indigenous Population. Introducing a new Species to solve one problem could result in a bigger problem. i read an article where bumblebees are imported to help pollination of greenhouse crops from Hungary and Poland these are now escaping and cross breeding with the indigenous population, Leading to sterility in native bees and introducing new mites and diseases.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 2356
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2015 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that, Greengage. Yes, I'm well aware of the problems caused by introduced 'solutions' to problems - think rabbits and some kind of toad(?) in Oz, not to mention the varroa mite on bees here.
But the nematodes in use against slugs and those used against wireworm do already occur here. The treatment involves introducing vast quantities of the beastie to tackle the target pest. Once the pest has been greatly reduced, the nematodes reduce in number to normal proportions, too. Or so we are told - and it does seem logical.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4162
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2015 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cane toads.
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)