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Help - need transplant cherry blossom in bloom this weekend!


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Sunflower
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2015 8:10 am    Post subject: Help - need transplant cherry blossom in bloom this weekend! Reply with quote

Hi All,

I have a problem in that I need to move a 4yr Kanzan Cherry blossom this weekend. I am fully aware that it should have been done when the tree was dormant but things change and this cannot be helped now and if we don't try to transplant it we'll lose the tree. It's planted in full sun and after four years it is doing really well. It really is a shame to move it to be honest.

We do have the use pf a small digger on Saturday so we're hoping to get a good majority of the rootball. It's only moving a short distance so it should be easy to keep it facing the same way towards the sun.
Any advice be greatly appreciated in regards to the rootball, moving, etc.

I'm also wondering about top pruning it when I move it as it has gone quite big - not a problem in its last space but moreso in the new space. Online advice differs between allowing the tree to keep its leaves until winter when I'd prune as normal or pruning top when also doing roots. Less shock for the tree the better.

Again, I know the time of year is all wrong for this job but what can I do.
I had one garden company refuse the job as they said it's all but inevitable I'll lose the tree and they suggested a new tree would save a lot of hassle - would I be better off just planting a new tree in the long run at extra cost?

Thanks so much,
Sunflower
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2015 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The bigger a rootball you can manage, the better luck you'll have with transplanting.

If the rootball that you manage to get out of the ground is big enough to enclose all the roots, I'd leave pruning until the autumn. If you rip through quite a few roots, then prune straightaway at time of transplanting.

Just my tuppence worth.

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tippben
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2015 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree, get the biggest rootball possible. The important roots will be in the top two to three feet of soil, and extend beyond the limit of the branches (the drip line). As you haven't undercut it, like they'd do in a nursery, you won't get a ball. You'll get a large flat plate. Try to cut any damaged roots cleanly with loppers, which will encourage regrowth.

It is not the ideal time of year to move it, but if it's move or die anyway.... Make sure not to plant any deeper than it was. Do not bury the root system. If anything, leave it very slightly higher, as the disturbed soil will settle. You will need to stake it again. I'd go for four sturdy stakes, set at the limits of the root system, then two bars in a cross shape, with rubber ties to the stem. I'd do this about 3 feet from the ground, as the point is to stop root rock in the wind. The stem must be able to flex, or it won't develop strongly enough to be self supporting later in life.

On pruning. Cherries should be pruned in July (ish), as that is when they are least likely to be infected with the fatal silver leaf fungus. I would prune it then. They do not respond well to heavy pruning though, unlike other types of tree, so if it is going to be too big (30 foot by 30 foot in 30 years), you have two options. Either leave it, try to prune it, and remove it when it starts looking really bad, or bite the bullet and replace it within a tree that will fit now, when it'll be cheaper.

The tree will need serious amounts of water for the next two to three years if you move it.
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Sunflower
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2015 12:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies,

Where the tree will be moved to will be nearer a driveway - only a few feet to spare really and closer to the house.
I had thought of hard pruning over the next few years to keep it to 18/20ft (is that pollarding??) but do you think I'd be better off replacing it now with something that would naturally reach that height?
Such a pity as the tree is thriving and I can't think off hand of where else to put it.

Thanks again
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2015 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

New tree needed. Cherries usually look awful if pruned hard and if you don't prune it, it will be far too big. Pity, but there you are.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2015 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ouch! I agree. P. Kanzan is definitely not the right tree. Never mind the height, the large and extensive surface root system will wreck your driveway.

Not knowing anything more than the information you have given, try thinking about https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/details?plantid=5872 instead.
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Sunflower
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2015 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your advice and Iím going to take it, itís got to go soÖwill do my best to find a space somewhere for it and will be interesting to observe it after the move, etc.

So now itís a small tree, def not a tall shrub, 20ft max with reasonable upright growth and some nice flowers or autumn colour for a small space near a driveway.

Tippben I like the Quince tree, it looks lovely but Iím wondering if there is a lot of fruit, which we donít want Ė the birds are very well fed in this garden as it is.

I also like the Japenese Maple tree and I see sjohanna on a previous post about small trees planted an Amelanchier which looks lovely.

I will find something but, as always, any suggestions greatly appreciated.
Thanks again
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tippben
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2015 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Japanese maples are very slow growing, and therefore expensive. If you have a neighbour growing one well, then that's viable. They tend to get brown tips on the leaves, especially the"dissecta" varieties. They hate early morning strong sunlight, and especially wind. We chose Sambucus nigra "Black Lace". It grows like common elder, but has the appearance of a laciniata maple, and can be cut hard with now problems. Amelanchier is a good choice. I picked quince because of the beautiful flower that would be similar to what you have now.
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Sunflower
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So it's moved - who knows how it'll end up but will be interesting to watch and see!

The digger was great, it kind of took it out in a large scoop and we moved to a different spot altogether, a little less sunlight but not too bad.
The only thing now is I've had two other people, both of whom love their gardens and who have a lot of experience, telling me to cut it back hard now and to make sure all blossoms are off...what do ye think?? I'm saying no but should I?? I was going to leave it until later in the year as advised but they think now due to the move...
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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can see where they are coming from. The stress will cause fabulous blooms, as the tree is now under severe stress, but rob the tree of even more energy. I'd pick them off by hand. The point of the pruning is to prevent excess loss of water through the leaves. The canopy will have matched the root system's ability to provide it with water, but that root system is damaged. I'd still prune in July, to prevent even more likelihood of fungal infection, as normal. The tree will need as many leaves as possible, to provide enough food to repair the root damage, so I really wouldn't prune hard. The tree won't send out shoots from the cut point like other broadleaves do. By July, you'll be able to see the stress developing. Some twigs will start dying back a bit. I'd prune to the first healthy leaf below that.
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Sunflower
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all the help guys - the poor thing is now moved, plucked and no doubt traumatised, so let's see what happens it!
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tippben
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PostPosted: Wed May 13, 2015 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How is it faring?
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Sunflower
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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Tippben,

Thanks for asking!
I'm not really sure yet. it's still standing at any rate, though I'm afraid it's a few inches higher than before...I was assured it would sink a little but I don't think it really has.
It was a shame to lose all the blooms but it looks ok overall, so far anyway!

Still undecided as to what is going in its place - there's some work to do there so have a few weeks before plant anything.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I was working on my friends garden build she told me that she would like to keep as many mature trees as possible. One of those trees was a large 'Kanzan' Cherry. The poor thing was clobbered in all directions, digging around the roots and being bashed by cranes and big lorries. It lost a number of branches and is decidedly lop-sided. But despite all this it's still with us and still flowering!
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Sunflower
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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have some faith in it too - though I do think a lot of my gardening neighbours / friends here (who are wonderful!) are wondering why go to all the bother for such a young tree - esp if can't even get time of year right! but I'd rather try save it if at all possible. it could be gone by July!
I'm more interested now in what will take its place - is a crabapple tree same old thing, I'm so predictable, I just love spring flowering trees. An Amelanchier my choice right now, will see...
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