Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Introduce yourself to the rest of the Irish gardeners

Here I go again!


Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next  
Most Recent Posts 2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Sue Deacon
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
funny
Last post: tagwex
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
Dearg Doom
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 19 Mar 2015
Posts: 8
Location: Co.Meath

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 1:55 pm    Post subject: Here I go again! Reply with quote

Hi everybody,
I have been lurking here for a while so have now decided to take the plunge and register.

I have decided (yet again) to try growing a few vegetables for myself.
I have tried before many times to grow my own veggies,but fell into the trap of overestimating myself, and trying to start off with a much bigger plot than I could manage properly .
So I am going to start off small with a small raised bed 4'x5' and try to grow some onions,carrots and lettuce and hopefully some garlic later on, but we will see how it goes!

Wish me luck!

Pat
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2748
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Best of luck and welcome ask any questions you want here, fairly friendly bunch all experts Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why the raised bed? Is your core soil hopeless?
_________________
A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 2356
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's good to see another 'forumite' getting active. I do hope your new growing venture works well. Try to locate your bed somewhere you will see it or pass by it regularly.
I've found that gardening for vegetables and salads is mostly a matter of "little and often", in that most tasks might not take long but if they are ignored the consequences can be dire. So it helps to have your beds where you will quickly notice what needs to be done.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AlanFletcher
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 19 Feb 2015
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well pa
I have already started my garlic in pots and it is well on its way now ☺.
When i was at my local garden centre i was advised to keep garlic plants in big pots in my greenhouse or in a warm sunny area so i would advise you to do the same 😃. Also if you like cucumbers now is the time to start the seeds. They also grow well in a large pot and produce much nicer cucumbers than store bought ones .

Best of luck
Alan Fletcher

_________________
Failure lies, not in falling down. Failure lies in not getting up
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2748
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any Pics of the produce
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AlanFletcher
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 19 Feb 2015
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry Greengage no pics of last years stuff only this years seedlings
Regards Alan Fletcher

_________________
Failure lies, not in falling down. Failure lies in not getting up
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dearg Doom
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 19 Mar 2015
Posts: 8
Location: Co.Meath

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the replies, I think Good guy hit the nail on the head..

Good guy wrote:
Try to locate your bed somewhere you will see it or pass by it regularly.
I've found that gardening for vegetables and salads is mostly a matter of "little and often", in that most tasks might not take long but if they are ignored the consequences can be dire. So it helps to have your beds where you will quickly notice what needs to be done.

As to the quality of soil,I'm not really sure,but it seems a bit sticky (as I said,I'm no expert)

I would have been pretty clueless regarding veg gardening but have gained some very good tips from this forum.

It was recommended to buy sets or bulbs to start of with rather than seeds and fresh manure was too rich for some veg so I got a few bags of well rotted stuff from the garden centre as well as garlic bulbs and onion sets.
So that is the plan of attack today. I hope to be putting down carrots and lettuce toward the end of April.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
OffalyGoodLife
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 08 Feb 2010
Posts: 27
Location: Co. Offaly

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Dearg Doom

Looking forward to hearing how your year develops, so good luck with it.

Are you trying some non-lettuce leaves, like Rocket or Mizuna? They grow fairly quickly and add a bit of extra flavour and interest alongside lettuces in salads. Also, I'd be careful with carrots in a newly-manured bad as I've read they can fork - maybe try some short or round varieties (which are also good in salads).

_________________
----------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.offalygoodlife.blogspot.ie/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2015 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

DD - As something of a 'newbie' on the forum you'll probably be bombarded by all the well minded citizens who want you to succeed and prosper into the future, but only you can sift through their advice and decide for yourself what's best for you.

Before investing in 'raised beds', or anything else for that matter, assess the pros and cons. Everywhere you look, gardeners on here will be looking for the Holy Grail of rot proof boards for their raised beds but, if you were to walk the soil of your area 50 years ago, would you have seen any raised beds? I very much doubt it. Did householders grow vegetables to help feed their families? Yep! So, is there really a need for raised beds? Probably not, but if that's the way you want your patch to look, go for it. It's yours after all, but think of the available space. Each bed will have a pathway round it on at least three sides and this will be permanently lost for growing in. Most gardens will develop paths between crops in any given year but one year's path will be another year's bed as crop rotation takes place. If your soil is a bit tacky, as you say, there'll be ways of lightening it or improving the drainage, if that's the cause.

You'll deduce that I'm not a raised bed fan but there are many who are. My garden is purely an exercise in productivity, not a show piece, but, as well as offering you encouragement, we all want you to avoid disappointment that might make you grass the lot over in a couple of years time. Good luck.

_________________
A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Dearg Doom
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 19 Mar 2015
Posts: 8
Location: Co.Meath

PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2015 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This time around I was planning on taking the easiest and hopefully most successful approach to joining the ranks of proper veg growers.
A success this time around would give me the confidence to continue on and expand next year.
I wanted to use raised beds as (amongst other things) I thought the sides would create a border to stop (or slow down there advances of )slugs and weeds etc from getting onto the growing area.
I found some old railway sleepers and sawed them in half to create sides, then nailed on heavy plastic sheeting to prevent any cresote leaking into soil.
I suppose what I have in reality is a kind of hybrid raised bed as I dug down into existing ground and built up with farmyard manure rather than using new topsoil.

I have never been successful growing veg before so if this little project works out I would aim to be more adventurous next year.
I have lots of space out at the back of the house (about half an acre) but its pretty exposed to the North and East so that would be an issue to be tackled.
Where my little bed is situated is in the most sheltered sunny part of the back garden.

OffalyGoodLife I really like your blog!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well done. You're already thinking things through but don't put yourself down. You'll always be a proper gardener, like we all are, but we have different levels of success, that's all.

Quite sensibly, you're doing your own small scale experiment and the crops you've selected shouldn't give you many problems. Keep the bed weed free but beware of pulling up the onion sets with the weeds in the early days, then at the end of summer you'll have loads of golden onions to last you through the winter.

_________________
A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
OffalyGoodLife
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 08 Feb 2010
Posts: 27
Location: Co. Offaly

PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dearg Doom wrote:
This time around I was planning on taking the easiest and hopefully most successful approach to joining the ranks of proper veg growers.
A success this time around would give me the confidence to continue on and expand next year.
I wanted to use raised beds as (amongst other things) I thought the sides would create a border to stop (or slow down there advances of )slugs and weeds etc from getting onto the growing area.
I found some old railway sleepers and sawed them in half to create sides, then nailed on heavy plastic sheeting to prevent any cresote leaking into soil.
I suppose what I have in reality is a kind of hybrid raised bed as I dug down into existing ground and built up with farmyard manure rather than using new topsoil.


This is more or less what we did here, and after five years we're still expanding! The method of cultivating, as with what you grow, is really a personal choice. Our beds give some structure to the garden, and a defined edge making weeding and further cultivation easier (certainly less daunting as you can tackle each bed one at a time). Our plot is on a bit of a slope, so the beds are sort of terraced which I think helps us to manage the area. Also, we've only ever dug each bed once (when we made them); after that they get weeded and mulched, but not much else. The soil here is okay, but a bit thin, so the beds get better year-on-year (so far). The beds are a big initial investment (in terms of both constructing the beds and preparing the soil), but seem to make life easier in subsequent years.

I'm sure I read somewhere that the deep-bed system actually produces more food from a given area than growing in rows, despite the permanent paths, but happy to be corrected on this. That said, I think the look of a veg garden with the traditional long rows is rather appealing and, although I've never grown that way, easier to establish initially...?

Finally, we'd never claim to be proper veg gardeners - we make most of it up as we go along, and probably have more failures than successes. For us, the most important thing is the enjoyment the whole process brings along the way, so try not to be too harsh on yourself.

_________________
----------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.offalygoodlife.blogspot.ie/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Dearg Doom
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 19 Mar 2015
Posts: 8
Location: Co.Meath

PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 12:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So far so good, I have a few onions and garlic starting to poke through the soil Very Happy

I have planted three small sycamore trees (bare roots) to divide off a section of the back garden for my little foray into self sufficiency.
Already I'm thinking of going a little bigger with the raised beds later on,and am planning on getting a couple of hens too.

I think I might be approaching a slippery slope here!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 2356
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's great to hear about all your progress, Dearg Doom, well done. A word of caution about the sycamores, though: they will grow into big trees remarkably quickly and make large demands on water, light and nutrients. They also produce a heck of a lot of seeds!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Introduce yourself to the rest of the Irish gardeners All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 1 of 5

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)