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Advice on planting trees in garden


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smeab
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 07 Mar 2015
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 9:31 pm    Post subject: Advice on planting trees in garden Reply with quote

Hi all,

I am looking for some advice about planting trees in our back garden. We've recently bought a house in an estate and it's very over looked. We have terraced houses to left/ behind and then two houses behind and one to our right. The site is quite big so we can afford to put up a few trees. Thanks to the advice from posts I've read so far We have decided on deciduous - but which ones!

I've ruled out common birch as I want something with a 'full head'. I like the paper birch as bark is gorgeous and they have the bulb/full head that I like. There is a cherry in the bottom corner which I love and I like the head of it now in winter.

Would anyone have any other ideas ? Also wondering what attached pic is? Like these.

Thanks in advance!



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Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are lime trees and will be way too big for any garden even in their current location they are wrong tree but thats another days work.
You dont want birch, and you need to screen views and deciduous so that leaves (excuse the pun) Hornbeam (Carpinus betulas Frans Fontaine), Turkish Hazel,(Corylus corluna) though it has being accused of introducing some nasty disease recently. Malus, Cratagus, Sorbus or how about a pleeched Hedge either beech or Hornbeam.
Most important let us know what you decide most people post and disappear, well see what the others have to say.
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Good guy
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 11:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sometimes it isn't neccessary to screen things out completely. It may sound counter-intuitive, but just providing something which will distract your eye from the thing you don't want to see is often enough. In other words, you may not need to hide something completely, just give yourself something else, that's pleasanter, to look at. So even a smaller tree such as a crab apple or hawthorn, with their lovely blossom and attractive fruit can effectively 'mask' a neighbouring building.

A mistake that people often make is to forget about the way the view changes, depending on the position you view it from. I argued for months with a man I know who wanted to plant a tree that would hide the ESB transformer on a pole in his garden. He just couldn't get it, that if he grew a tree that hid the pole from the kitchen-window view, he would still see it from his sitting room. Eventually, he got the pole moved, at considerable cost. I'd have planted something prettier to look at, which wouldn't be hard to do and would be a lot cheaper.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I should have mentioned that tree lime trees become infected with aphids, which secrete sap from the tree during the summer months and can destroy cars and patios also grass will not grow under it, some varieties can have a necrotising effect on bees (Making them drunk) making them angry. And dont get me started on magpies thet will be starting their racket soon.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 11:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Smeab. Could we please have some more detailed information on the size of your site, exactly what you wish to screen (and form where), aspect etc. Photos?

There are plenty of trees with the general shape you like, but they all have different quirks to be taken into account. Even big estate gardens are pretty small from a tree's point of view, and it's incredibly important to get the right tree for the right place.
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smeab
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all the replies. Smile
OK to give a bit more of an idea I have attached a picture (an aerial view of the back garden). Where I have marked in red is where I would like to plant the trees.
Good guy - I totally get what you mean re the screening and thats why we aren't going for something like a leylandi or hedge (as you can see our neighbours have). I want to stick with something that will be pretty to look at.
We also have an issue in the front garden - see attached. Here I would like to plant something evergreen in the left corner. As the options are limited I am thinking of going with a cotoneaster cornubia... all suggestions welcome.
Again I don't want something too big just something that will distract the eye as you approach the house. I hope to plant a few shurbs in around the left wall too (all in time!)
Thanks
Ps Greengage - I will def post the pictures once the trees are in



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Good guy
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cotoneaster Cornubia would go very well there, provided you give it enough space from the shrubs. It does very well for me, keeping most of its leaves all winter and giving good berries. Our winters tend to be mild, though windy. Where abouts are you? You might consider a holly (not variegated) somewhere near the right hand end of your red line. I don't think its roots would affect the house (though I'd take advice on that) and it could be encouraged into a nice tall conical shape to contrast the looser shapes of other trees. Malus Red Sentinel keeps its little scarlet apples all winter and has good blossom. It would go well where you get a year-round view of it from the conservatory. Your garden seems big enough that you could easily plant a native birch in the corner without causing yourself or a neighbour any problems. A Rowan would go well at the left end of your line. Some of them (Kashmiriana?) have a light and delicate appearance due to their finely cut foliage; they have good flowers and berries, too. It wouldn't be hard to fit a fastigiate cherry into the scheme, either.
Another tree you might think of, for the front, is Acer griseum; the foliage is lovely and the bark is striking all year round but especially in winter. They are expensive and slow-growing, but lovely. I have one that's about 30 years old and it has pride of place in the garden.

Hope this is of use to you. Good luck and happy planting! (A part of me wishes I could start all over again with a blank canvas!)
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fraxinus excelsior jaspidea ,Acer capillipes,Arbutus x andrachnoides,Prunus serula and Parrottiahas all have nice bark. Abelia, Corylus contorta, Deutzia and hydrangeas are small shrubs, They look like Kildare houses Am I right.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not Kildare town anyway and I don't think it is Naas either going by the clues in the pictures.
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smeab
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes we are Naas. I think the site is quite sheltered so hopefully the Cornubia tree will work. Good guy thanks for all the advice. The Malus Red Sentinel is on the list its fab. It is exciting having this blank canvas but I just want to do it right!
Thanks Greengage i'm off to do a google on all the mentioned. I'm cautious about planting too many different types of trees. A friend advised that we go for uniformity so I need to make some decisions ASAP
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maigheomac
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Let me throw in my two cents.... How about including a good old holly ilex aquifolium? Always looks well. Nice glossy green leaves, evergreen, good screenage and if you're lucky some red berries.
It is also native to climate so doing extra bit for environment...great for wildlife... robust to disease and grows at a manageable rate?
Also, provide a bit of security if you plant at the front by way of the prickly leaves

You can put one of these in, and either form it into a hedge, a standard or let it grow up into a small tree. I have some and they are a great plant, look after themselves and easily pruned?
Good luck with whatever you plant!
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Naas, but not quite Naas, more a satellite village to it! Huge plot though compared to the rest, almost a double plot however that happened. I thought developers would be trying to squeeze in units everywhere. Their loss is your gain as you have a massive garden to nurture and cultivate. Shrubs everywhere is what I would do.
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I knew it was close.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 8:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're getting as bad as me now.
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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tippben
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2015 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Guy's suggestions are very good. I was actually thinking of Acer griseum as a clear stem standard, 12-14 cm girth, flanked by two Arbutus before I read the post! My favourite rowan is Sorbus aucuparia "Sheerwater Seeedling" which is a native cultivar, and grows with a narrow habit. For spring and autumn interest, I'd also look for Cretaegous monogyna "Crimson Cloud", another native hawthorn/whitethorn, which has a red edge to its petals, but being a single bloom, also produces haws in autumn. The corner of the garden, you could even go for a standard mulberry (Morus nigra) if you have a bit of cash spare.
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