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Edible landscapes - I plan do grow a Blue Berry hedge


 
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worded
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2015 9:31 pm    Post subject: Edible landscapes - I plan do grow a Blue Berry hedge Reply with quote

Hi,

Instead of the usual green hedge I would really like to grow a Blue Berry hedge.

So Max of approx. 5 foot.

The disadvantages are that they are not ever green all year round but that's ok.

I may need to protect them from birds I hear

This looks great to protect a single bush but not great for my plans

Is my idea practical? Will it have some sort of orderly shape if I trim it late in the year?

Any suggestion and advice ?



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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I dont know that would be a new one to me, A couple of things you would have to consider, they are not native, you would have to get a tall variety, you would need acid soil and plenty of water (Sure the conservation grant for water would help towards buying the percolation hose) i would also suspect they would be bare at the base, the birds would eat all the fruit. Why do you want blueberry hedge are you open to other options.
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Kim
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have some blueberries netted and some not, once the birds find a bush they will take some or I suppose all depending what other food is about. Blueberries fruit over several weeks.

If you trim your hedge you will reduce fruit production but Blueberries don't grow that big and are slow to establish. Simply removing a little old wood every year or two is best for fruit production.

They need very acid soil and moisture in the summer. If those requirements are met they make a lovely bush.

Our soil is only slightly acid and they are not very vigorous for me, they do well enough though,They would do better in ideal conditions.

Is the hedge within the garden or part of the garden boundary?
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Kim
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage posted while I was writing. Although blueberries are not native, frockens are. In Irish gardens where frockens would grow, blueberries would be the natural choice in the same way an eating apple could be grown where crab apples naturalise.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kim - frockens? That's a new one on me! Do you mean bilberry?
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Sive
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fraughans would be the normal spelling. And yes, it is the Irish word for bilberry I think.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll add that to the list - Bilberry, Blaeberry and, my favourite, Whortleberry. Smile

Flavour-wise the bilberry is far superior (I think) to any blueberry. But with much less fruit per bush.

I have very happy memories of a beautiful summer's day, picking bilberries on Exmoor (even our dog joined in - she loved them too) then walking back to Minehead and buying apple slices and clotted cream to have with the berries. Afraid these days it's a solitary occupation - no one else can be bothered.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It COULD work. As others have said, the soil needs to be acid. Test it for pH first. If it comes out at pH 7 or more, forget it. Either way, dig out a metre wide trench, either 2' deep, or until you reach subsoil. Mix the topsoil with lots of ericaceous compost. Line the base of the trench with black polythene, pierced with a garden fork. This will help retain moisture. Backfill, and plant.

If you actually want fruit. you will need to add 6' stakes at 2m intervals, with a continuous top rail. When the fruits start to appear, you will need to completely cover the entire hedge, using this structure, with bird netting, leaving absolutely no gaps. This may not be the aesthetic effect you are hoping for.

In addition, you will need to feed the plants with ericaceous feed regularly, and water regularly. If enough people refuse to pay, and Irish Water is defeated, no problem. If not, it may end up cheaper to buy blueberries...
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are lots of other things you could grow to make en edible hedge and many of them might be easier and make better hedges - Berberis Darwinii, for one. But whatever you decide, good luck with it!
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Kim
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2015 7:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it was me, I wouldn't try to change soil conditions very much to suit the plant but instead find a plant to suit the soil conditions I have. Well that is the way I do work!

If you have moist acid soil, and a lot of people do, and are looking for a pretty, open, deciduous hedge, then why not? and maybe the birds won't eat all of the fruit and maybe you're happy to share with the birds. Most people don't harvest food from their hedges anyway. There are lots of other edible options and lots of other aesthetic options. Ask away!
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2015 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So what did you do in the end worded?
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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