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Good guy
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That must be quite a racket!
At Inch Levels, which is a few hundred acres of land reclaimed from the sea, they gather with geese to graze or maybe glean left over grain from the barley crop. The land is very wet in winter and right now lots of it is flooded. I suppose many of the soil critters, worms and such, are forced to the surface by the water, making easier pickings.
Beyond the dyke that keeps the sea out there are extensive tidal mud flats full of waders etc and there is a biggish lake which plays host to huge gatherings of waterfowl. Earlier this winter Birdwatch Ireland opened a new boardwalk giving better access to the lake and I think there may be more hides, too.
I think Inch Levels is one of the stop-off points for the Greenland geese on their way to the Wexford slobs (but we won't mention them, in case Tagwex thinks we are getting personal!) whatever, it's a brilliant place to have so close.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where the post above says "Beyond the x", I used a word to describe the kind of wall that keeps the sea out. The sort the Dutch boy stuck his finger into. The program that operates this site seems to have censored it! What a silly bit of PC nonsense!
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verge
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Where the post above says "Beyond the x", I used a word to describe the kind of wall that keeps the sea out. The sort the Dutch boy stuck his finger into. The program that operates this site seems to have censored it! What a silly bit of PC nonsense!


Another legacy word censor from the time when the forum began and we were getting hit with porn spam that may have been seen by young eyes researching projects for school nature classes and the like.
We have better ways to stop that pollution of the website now.
Thanks for highlighting this.
i will get to removing it. Smile

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Last edited by verge on Tue Jan 20, 2015 12:52 pm; edited 1 time in total
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verge
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorted now.
As you were. Wink
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

But the Wexford slobs are a far better bird sanctuary than your ould Inch Levels!!!!
You stay going to your local one, you're too close even there.

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Margo
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good guy wrote:
That must be quite a racket!


It is especially when they fly over
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Verge, for your prompt action.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Margo wrote:
Good guy wrote:
That must be quite a racket!


It is especially when they fly over


When you are walking towards the dyke on its landward side, often geese and swans will suddenly appear overhead, having taken off from the foreshore - at only 15 or 20 feet they can be quite scary!
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The reason robins arrive as soon as you start digging in the garden is quite interesting (well, it is to me anyway!). In evolutionary terms, they are a forest bird and originally would have learnt to follow wild boar through the forest. As the boar dug up the ground for truffles etc the robin would glean the turned-over ground.
Now of course, the robins associate humans (especially humans that are digging!) with food. Adaptive evolution at it's best!
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 3:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for that nugget of info, Baabamaal.
No shortage of robins in my garden. Tagwex probably thinks I'm a wild bore anyway. Does he have a red waistcoat ( I'm afraid to use the b word in case I excite the auto-censor again!)
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 4:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, last robin-related factoid. Neil "Razor" Ruddock, famous football hard man should in fact be called Neil "Razor" Robin Rebreast because ruddock is the anglo-saxon for "red bird" (i.e. robin). It doesn't have quite the same ring to it when you are trying to break somebody's leg on a football pitch
.
The dunnock (another well known garden bird) is just the anglo-saxon for "brown bird".

The anglo-saxons didn't appear to use poetic licence when naming birds.

Anyhow, I'm totes devo (as the young people would say)* because I haven't seen a single greenfinch, goldfinch, redpoll or house sparrow at my feeders all winter and normally I would be seeing dozens of them. I'm hoping that the mild weather has resulted in them not needing my charity.

*"Totes devo" means "totally devasted" in younglish.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No shortage of sparrocks in my garden, either. I've seen a few greenfinche but no goldfinches or redpolls as yet. I planted teazles two years ago in the hope of attracting goldfinches but without much success yet. There are probably too many thistles on some nearby 'waste' ground!
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Margo
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nobody has mentioned the blo......dy magpies. I loathe them with vengance like the crows
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't mind Magpies or Crows. It's the Blackbirds I hate. They're the spawn of the devil and cause ten times more destruction in the garden then all the other birds combined.
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Margo
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Location: Summerhill Mayo Ireland

PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only have 2 blackbirds here and the only damage they do is peck the grass underneath the bird table thus its getting quite bald under there.
Crows and magpies are the bane of our life round here. The crows love to dig the bulbs up in my tubs and yes I've caught them doing it. I planted over a 100 crocus in the tubs. I found all the compost everywhere and on checking there wasn't any bulbs left.
The crows have pecked all the putty out of our neighbours windows
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