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Saving a family heirloom rose


 
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saorla
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 10:49 am    Post subject: Saving a family heirloom rose Reply with quote

Apparently it's a rose first cultivated by my great great grandfather and so I have no idea what it's called or any other information. It's growing in the corner of the front bed and been neglected for the past 15 years, I'd say.

I'm trying to overhaul the front bed which is a mass of briars, scutch grass, fennel, sea buckthorn and the roses. As they are family heirlooms I'd like to save them but the growth is huge, and I'd no idea where to start. (I'll post pics later today)

I thought of taking cuttings and keeping them in pots to replant next spring. Is this a sensible idea? Should I bring them indoors during the winter? Should I just prune it severely and hope it survives?

I love growing fruit and veg but I've never dealt with flowers before so any advice would be great. Please and thanks.
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What type of rose is it, Saorla?
Try to post a few pics of it so that we can be of better help.

In the meantime here is a piece I wrote on..... Taking a Cutting from a Climbing or Rambling Rose

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saorla
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks James I read your link yesterday. Can I re-pot cuttings in pots rather than directly into the soil - garden needs a lot of work before replanting!

Should I take the pots in for the winter?

Here are some pics anyway. I think it's a rambling rose but it's been so neglected that it's hard to tell!



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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2014 11:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Thanks James I read your link yesterday. Can I re-pot cuttings in pots rather than directly into the soil - garden needs a lot of work before replanting!

Should I take the pots in for the winter?

Here are some pics anyway. I think it's a rambling rose but it's been so neglected that it's hard to tell!


Yes you can pot the cuttings in pots rather than directly into the soil, however with the "in the soil" method the moisture levels are easier to manage, as mother nature will provide it from the sky and the natural water within open ground.

Should you take the pots in for the winter?
There should be no need to do this.

Another easy and highly successful method of propagation for your rose would be layering...... although you would need some clean space around the plant.
Here is a piece I wrote on it..........

Simple layering.
When to carry out: Layering can be done almost any time of the year, but springtime is preferable, due to active growth.

Suitable plants: With simple layering you will be able to clone many of the “hard to root” plants, for example Azaleas, Rhododendron, and Magnolia. In fact most common garden shrubs can be propagated with this method, such as Escallonia, Berberis, mock orange, flowering currant, Rosemary, Forsythia, and dogwood. Climbing plants lend themselves equally well to layering as they have extremely flexible shoots, for example honeysuckle, Clematis, Wisteria, and not forgetting our climbing & rambling roses.

What you require: a sharp knife, a tub of hormone rooting powder, and a brick, rock, or length of wire clothes hanger.

How to layer: Select a healthy low-growing branch, which is pliable enough to bend down to soil level. Remove any leaves and side-shoots for about 15-60cm (6-24 inches) behind the growing tip, but leave the bunch of leaves at the end of the stem. Now bend the leafless section down to ground level to allow you judge the spot where you would like roots to develop.

Using a sharp knife make a small slit cut on the underside of the branch about 15cm (6 inches) from the shoot tip. The nick should penetrate the outer skin or cambium layer of the branch and travel towards the tip for about 2 or 3cms. Dust the cut area with hormone rooting powder ensuring a coating of the powder sticks to the exposed sap.

Make a small depression in the soil with a trowel or spade, then bend the cut area of branch into this and cover with soil to the original level. As a young vigorous branch is quite springy you will have secure it in place. Simply set a brick or rock on top of the buried section, or else push a “U” shaped length of wire clothes hanger deep into the soil.

Water the buried shoot and parent plant regularly to keep the rooting area moist. Keep the soil around your layer weed-free. Take care when weeding because the new roots are easily damaged.

If you began your layer in spring then the new plant can be cut away from the parent that autumn to allow transplanting. Plants layered after spring has passed should not be disturbed until the following year, so the new plant has a good spell of active growth to form healthy roots.

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