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building a shed


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Good guy
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More word-play than wind-up.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When was the last time you saw a horse in a corset?
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
Good guy wrote:
Joke.............

Are you trying to wind me up again?


It takes little or no effort to wind you up... Confused
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ponddigger
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 31 Jan 2010
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Location: co tipp

PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 10:32 am    Post subject: shed Reply with quote

hi fokes.getting the 6 b6 in posts ready ,so as we can concrete them in .jack


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getting posts ready
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putting on some pereseve on timber .ready to concrete them in
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wrap a fertiliser bag around them and seal it at the top to prevent water ingress.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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tagwex
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Joined: 23 Feb 2010
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Geranimojess wrote:
It takes little or no effort to wind you up... Confused

Jaaaaaysus you are back again after yet another holiday.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good guy wrote:
I'd like to develop further the points about maths education made by Greengage and Tagwex. In order to do so, without drifting too far off topic, I will tell you a story about me and maths:

I well remember the day I was "taught" Pythagoras theorem at school. A bunch of numbers and letters were written up on the blackboard, in a line, I seem to remember. Then a drawing of a triangle was done and the teacher went through some kind of a rigmarole of an explanation which left me, for one, none the wiser.

That evening I was required to use the "information" acquired in class, in my homework. I remember feeling in total despair, knowing that this was really probably quite simple, but being completely unable to decode it satisfactorily.
I went to my father when he got home from work and told him the problem. He got out a sheet of squared paper and drew a right-angled triangle. Within a couple of minutes we had drawn squares on each side and worked out the respective areas. Bingo! The beautiful elegance of Pythagoras theorem was revealed, all through an excellent, simple, practical piece of teaching like that in the link Greengage posted. Little of my school maths teaching was as well done, unfortunately.

It seems that I have a strong visual, spatial, sense, but have a difficulty with some aspects of maths, akin to the way dyslexia affects aspects of literacy. Geometry is easy-peasy, but I have difficulty with understanding algebraic equations though I can manipulate them, without really knowing what I am doing. And I will often make a calculation correctly but write out the answer wrongly - I'll write 453, instead of 345, for instance. So I've become a firm adherent to the old carpenter's adage "Measure twice, cut once". Incidentally, Greengage's extensions to the 3,4,5 series don't read as a recognisable series to me - I'd have to work them out to see whether they fit the pattern.

As a potter, I developed an interest in glaze chemistry, and for years I taught it as part of the ceramics course I led, becoming a bit of an expert. This involved a lot of arithmetic, in the pre-computer '70s and 80s - I used log tables, before calculators were available. I used to warn my students to look out for my mistakes - we had a good laugh about that and it helped others who found technical/theoretical aspects of the course hard. But we had fun balancing our equations and turning formulae into glaze recipes; then we had the anticipation, waiting to see what the alchemy of the kiln revealed. My maths difficulty actually helped me be a better teacher.

One good result of all this is that I have developed a strong empathy with people who have literacy or other learning difficulties and find strategies for coping with them. I am writing about it here, even though it may seem "off topic" because, while everyone needs to have some facility with maths - to build sheds, sow seeds, cook, take medication etc., being "good at maths" is not a be-all-and-end-all. As someone once said, "There are more ways than one of skinning a cat" and there are many ways in which to be intelligent. All human beings are intelligent in multiple ways; many of these kinds of intelligence are, unfortunately, ignored by the type of narrowly focused educational system that has evolved in our society since the Industrial Revolution.

Sorry about all that, Ponddigger! Let's get back to your shed; you explain the process very well.


Very, very good post. Salute.

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
Wrap a fertiliser bag around them and seal it at the top to prevent water ingress.


Plastic bags don't work 'cos the water will get in anyway and being trapped and unable to go anywhere will rot the wood. Pressure treated is good but even better is burning the ends of the timber that'll go in the ground. The Romans did this and it worked.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"And seal" being the operative words KS. Mastic around the top and an optional hole in the bottom just in case.
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
Wrap a fertiliser bag around them and seal it at the top to prevent water ingress.


Plastic would make the Timber sweat and contribute to a quicker demise...best to stand the Timber in a Bucket of Preserve overnight...
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ponddigger
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Joined: 31 Jan 2010
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Location: co tipp

PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 7:50 pm    Post subject: shed Reply with quote

hi fokes.we concrete in the post,no plastic bags.make sure there is a fall on the concrete from the posts to the outside,so the water will run off,we will put black pitch on the concrete later to seal it. jack


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few supports
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supports on posts
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ready for concrete
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posts plum and to the lines
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ponddigger
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi


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make sure the concrete is falling from the post to the outside,we will put black tar on the concrete later to seal it
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lads will yea let the man build the shed, he knows what hes doing.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2014 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It would appear so Greengage.
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Good guy
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2014 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your response, KS.
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