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gas bottle stove


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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haven't started yet Jack, just thinking about it.
Some ideas though - a brake disc on top for a saucepan, a baffle internally, slits underneath for air draw and ash removal, a wooden handle and a cinder box underneath. Going the whole hog by wrapping a copper pipe around it for hot water. Heat resistant paint that is used on motorbike exhausts will not blister and burn away.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

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ponddigger
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 8:19 pm    Post subject: gas bottle stove Reply with quote

hi started fire in stove .works great .puts out some heat .jack


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fired up
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some heat of little stove
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happy with my little gas bottle stove
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tagwex
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2014 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Impressive.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2014 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a heat-resistant glove that came with the stove we installed in our sitting room a couple of years ago. Having ONCE grabbed the handle with my bare hand, I'm unkilely to do it again. Stupid design, though, in a manufactured appliance. I'm sure stove suppliers would sell gloves like this.
Another approach would be:
When I was a boy, we used to make our fishing rods with a bamboo first section and a fibreglass top. We threaded rings of cork onto the bamboo section and sanded them down to make a really good handle. If cork sections like that are still available, threaded onto rebar, they would make very good heat-resistant handles for stoves.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2014 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or you could use a fire blanket. to wrap the handle, depending on how good your sewing skills are Good Guy.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2014 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fire blankets are flame proof but I don't know about their insulating properties. As for my sewing skills, I will so on a button if pushed, but that's about it!
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2014 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good guy wrote:
I have a heat-resistant glove that came with the stove we installed in our sitting room a couple of years ago. Having ONCE grabbed the handle with my bare hand, I'm unkilely to do it again. Stupid design, though, in a manufactured appliance.

we very deliberately bought a stove with a wooden handle on the front. it's an idiot design to use bare metal.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2014 12:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We bought a Charnwood stove to heat our kitchen/family room and to provide hot water. It's been a great buy and although the door handle is metal, it never gets more than warm - some very clever design. Then we bought an Aarrow "slot in" stove to close up our sitting room fireplace, while still allowing for a fire but omitted to check the handle design. Dumb, eh? But you only burn your hand once!
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2014 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i know people are rarely unhappy with their stoves, but we bought one of these, and it's a cracker:

http://inisstoves.ie/index.php/stoves/room-heating-stoves/inis-airc-mk2-roomheater

they're one of the few companies who make their stoves in ireland too - i know boru are made in ireland too, and i think there may be one other company.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2014 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Snap, Good Guy, we have a Charnwood stove too which heats a big open plan kitchen/dining/sitting room....very pleased with it, except the glass doesn't stay clear and needs cleaning.
Those Inis stoves look good M.K., I'm sorry we didn't see any Irish-made ones when we were looking about eight years ago.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2014 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sive wrote:
except the glass doesn't stay clear and needs cleaning

I find that a new stanley blade is great for cleaning the glass.Others say use the ash out of the stove as a cleaning agent. I am told that if you experiment with your draught settings that the glass will never get sooty. Some people have perfected this and they say the glass never needs a cleaning.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Sive
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 4:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's the theory and it may be a worse problem with unseasoned wood, but if we close down the draught to keep the fire going overnight, the glass always goes black. Yes, ash is good, but it's just a hassle to have to do it every day.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think a lot of that is down to the fuel. If I just burn smokeless coal, particularly Ecoflame, all the glass needs is a wipe with a damp cloth; if my wood is very dry the same applies.* Otherwise, yes, cleaning the glass - I use ashes and very rarely Brillo if it's really hard to shift - is a pain. We haven't tried overnight burning yet as we haven't needed it.
*note to self: phone wood supplier to stockpile next year's supply.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Use the stanley knife, it works really well.
Don't close the draught down completely, experiment each night with the notch in a slightly different position and soon enough you will find the ideal point.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We rarely keep the woodstove burning overnight....only on the very coldest of winter nights.... but if there's the slightest breeze, we have to close the vents to keep the fire going till the morning.
Speaking of woodstoves, I hope you all have installed carbon monoxide alarms.
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