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Useful Recycling


 
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 12:18 pm    Post subject: Useful Recycling Reply with quote

1) Standard milk cartons make ideal holders for paint/creosote. Purpose built handle, easy access for a brush and throw it away afterwards.

2) Plastic pipes of all sizes will make useful clips. Cut into short lengths, and again lengthways, pieces of black water main will hold plastic sheeting or fleece on to a tubular metal frame, whereas an old plastic downpipe (illustrated) holds an old coal sack (for plastic recycling items) on to a plastic bin we use for food cans. People in drawing offices have traditionally used these for holding large sheets of paper on drawing boards.

3) Plastic bottles can be cut in half to make funnels and the blue bleach bottles have the added benefit of their handles which make transferring either liquids or granulated solids into other containers easier. I always keep one wedged into a corner of the engine compartment of the car to facilitate topping up with oil.

4) a 6-inch nail, inserted in a wooden handle, can make a useful mini-dibber for potting on seedlings etc.

5) Graduated nail pulling blocks, made from scrap bits of wood, make it easier to extract nails and, if necessary, keep them straight for re-use. Moving the claw hammer up the steps achieves this and I always have a box of used nails in case I need one when all the shops are shut.

6) 5-litre (or 2-litre) water containers make ideal cloches for newly planted seedlings. One can then use a hose to water them without battering them into the gtound as the water will flow down the outsides of the containers.

7) Cleaning fluid bottles, trimmed just below their necks, are useful for spreading fertiliser. Those shown have been used for six years to scoop up peanuts and bird seed for filling up wild bird feeders. Not only are they durable but they are an ideal width for the job.

Cool All sorts of plastic containers can be pressed into service for storage where the original packaging is likely to collapse.



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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4172
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With age comes wisdom blowin and lateral thinking!
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“It’s my field. It’s my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!”

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Lius
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
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Location: Ballinteer, Dublin

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there any way of sending an e-maill with all that stuff?
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
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Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lius - No problem. If I'm not breaking the Forum rules, email me on nick@ipixnet.com
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Lius
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 4:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin,

I think that joke went over your head.
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Like the small roach in the pike's mouth - obviously.
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
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Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CROP PROTECTION

Having just had our garage roof replaced, I’ve found that those doing the job had no use for the old battening they took off and much of it is rock hard seasoned wood that has been baked by the sun over decades.

From just that one job I saved 24 each of 10ft and 6ft lengths plus a lot of shorter bits and firewood. I also have a plan in mind for the whole slates that came off.

For some years I’ve had a few wire ‘cloches’ made from bits of pallet wood but this latest supply has taken the idea to whole new level.

I had a part roll of wire netting left over from making a chicken run and cut lengths of black water main pipe @ 6 ins more than the width of the netting. Holes were drilled @ 3 ins from each end of the pipe lengths and in their centres – at right angles to their natural curve. Three lengths to a 10ft ‘cloche’.

Using galvanised screws and plastic roofing washers (9 of each) the 10ft battens were screwed to the inside of the pipe lengths until within 0.5 in of tight. A suitable length of wire netting was then stretched over the outside, placed under the washers and the screws tightened. The ends of the netting were folded over to hide ragged ends.

These protect crops from pigeons, rabbits etc. but, by clipping fleece or split open coal sacks to the outside – see earlier – they can prevent frost damage or blight.

If the timber is free for the asking, keep an eye open for roofers at work.

When dew lasts longer than we want on the lawn for mowing, one of these shorter ones (see nearest the camera) can be turned on its back with a rope tied to each end and towed up and down the lawn to knock it all off and speed up the drying process.



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Blowin
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SHED STORAGE

Using standard widths of Contiplas (or similar) chip board, this handy cupboard can be made.

The door/overall width is 15 inch and the sides 9 inch. 6 inch plate glass shelves are routed into the sides at desired intervals - ? 7 inches. Wire ties at intervals hold the two sides from parting. 2.5 inch wire racks are fixed to the inside of the door.

Lidl coffee jars are rectangular with convenient flat surfaces for labelling and will hold smaller quantities of items.

Plastic ‘Vanish’ tubs are incredibly durable and hold larger quantities, while any really large items can sit on the ground.

For smaller items like pins and tacks, there is no better storage container than the spice jars that are found in most kitchens, and these will stand nicely in the door racks.

Although only part shown, the one above is well over ten years old and is 8ft high, thus providing me with enough storage space for all my bits and bobs – easily found too!



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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The shelving unit is brill, so compact. When I look into mine I guess there is 2/3 of it empty yet it is full if you know what I mean.
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“It’s my field. It’s my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!”

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fantastic job.
Any chance you'd come and organise my stuff? If I put any more bits and pieces in the old toolbox I keep them in, I won't be able to lift it!
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4172
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He might not find you tucked away in your little corner of the world, unlike some!!!
_________________
“It’s my field. It’s my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!”

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Guy - Having spent an enjoyable holiday in Rathmullen, I think Donegal and West Cork are similar - a damn great rock with patches of soil on it. Apropos organising your stuff ..... do you pay travelling time?

Glad you approve, though.

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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 5:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Guy - Having spent an enjoyable holiday in Rathmullen, I think Donegal and West Cork are similar - a damn great rock with patches of soil on it. Apropos organising your stuff ..... do you pay travelling time?

Glad you approve, though.

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Good guy
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2014 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No travelling time paid, sorry.
You're right about the similarities between W Cork and Donegal - though I think your climate is a little more clement. Loads of rock, though and lots of great gardening opportunities. And we have better mountains!
Did you get to see any of our gardens? There are some terrific ones on the Donegal Garden Trail. I spent a couple of holidays in Union Hall 20+ years ago and thoroughly enjoyed them. I visited a few gardens too, though I forget the names, except for Bantry House. From what I read in the gardening press, there are many more open now. Perhaps it's time to pay a return visit.
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