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Price of a pea


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tagwex
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Joined: 23 Feb 2010
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 12:04 am    Post subject: Price of a pea Reply with quote

I have been collecting packets of pea seed for the last few weeks from three different garden centres and finally got around to putting in about 1200 this evening and another 788 tomorrow. Anyway, I was going through the literature on the packets this evening and noticed a big difference in the quantity of seed per packet compared to the price. I am presuming that some are more expensive for whatever reason but what is the reason I wondered to myself, a pea is a pea no.
Unwins...Hurst greenshaft.....3......300 seeds.
Unwins.... Ann.....3.....260 seeds.
Unwins.....Delikata....3.....130 seeds.
Suttons......Sugar Bon.......4.50......288 seeds.
Thompson & Morgan.....Jumbo......2.69.....250 seeds.
Thompson & Morgan......Hurst greenshaft.....3.69.....250 seeds.

In case anyone is doing the maths, I was given approx. 400 in a brown paper bag from a neighbour.
I did notice that certain varieties were gone from the shops before others, people seemed to be going for the same ones as I was left with much the same choice in all three shops.
Would I be right in saying that the last two would make the better marrowfat peas?

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Blowin
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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 7:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hurst Greenshaft have proved themselves with me for the last seven seasons but be warned about the height they grow to. The packet told me they'd grow to 2-2.5 ft but they eventually topped the 5 ft mark which is something of a problem if you've only given them sticks of, say, 3 ft to climb up. I wrote and told the supplier (Dobies) about 5 years ago and they replied that the variety could grow taller if the ground was particularly good - mine sure ain't - but they still maintain the 2-2.5 ft description.

I'd recommend a bit of caution with Thompson & Morgan. I got this year's seeds from them (via Mr Middleton's) for the first time and results thus far have been mixed to say the least. Leeks, Spring Onions, Radish, Peas and Broad Beans have all done fairly well but their 'Cobra' Runner Bean (7 germinated out of 24 sown in trays), Cauliflower (about 10 from a packet), Cabbage (1 seedling from a whole packet), Curly Kale and Brussels Sprouts (not a thing) all give cause for concern.

The beauty of this family of plants is that you can save your own seed. At the end of each season the last of the pods won't be edible so I take all those left on my pea, broad bean and runner bean rows, place them on trays to dry out thoroughly and then put them in paper or cloth bags - not polythene as they may still have a little moisture and go mouldy. For the following season, just in case there's a problem with what I've saved, I always include just one packet of seed with my order. With peas I draw out my row and sprinkle a few of the new stock along its whole length. I then take those I've saved and spread them evenly along the row. I usually finish up with a very dense 'hedge' of plants but they produce more peas than we can eat so, in the words of the proverb, if it ain't broke - don't fix it.

Mercifully, the few hundred runner bean seeds I kept last year have got me out of the trouble I've had with my Cobras. 95% success rate.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's interesting, I shall mark my plant labels with the supplier just to see how things turn out. The Thompson & Morgan came from a recently opened garden centre, odd in a way in that when that one was opening another one was announcing its closing down sale about 12 miles away.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Wes
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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agree with the height of the peas, my hurst are about 4' now, but I find once the bottom half have a sturdy support, theyre fine.

I also have Cobra runners by T&M bought via Mr Middleton, all but one germinated and are doing very well.

Ive often come across packets of various things that just wont germ, I'd buy another pack if it happened. If it happened for a second time running, change brand or variety.
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For height try out Irish Green Pea from the Seed Savers. The years that I grew it, it was still growing past my support which was 2 m high. Others in the allotment had problems with pea weevil but I was spared this scourge.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 9:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wes wrote:
Agree with the height of the peas, my hurst are about 4' now.

4'? I am so jealous. Mine not even out of the ground yet.
My real question though was, although I didn't say it. Why is Delikata only 130 seeds for roughly the same money? I think I will make all my wigwams 2m high anyway, covers all eventualities.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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tippben
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PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Delikata is a Mangetout pea. You eat the whole pod before the pea really forms. They are sold for a very high price in supermarkets, flown in from Africa. That's why they can charge a higher price for the seeds, and why it's still a good deal.
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Wes
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PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2014 12:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sown late last year to see if they'd overwinter, about half came up around early-mid March.
Pods have length, now just need to bulk.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2014 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So mangetout written on the packet means one can eat the whole lot. I have another packet here, sugar bon, which states that pod and pea can be eaten and mangetout is not written on the packet. Which leads to my next question, the thoughts of having to shell all them is frightening, so can all varieties be eaten pod and all? It will hardly kill us will it?
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2014 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'mangetout' literally translates as 'eat everything'.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2014 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I thought that, French was beaten into me from the age of 11 to 18, hated it, so I vaguely remember some of it. The point is though that the packet that states one can eat pod and pea does not have mangetout written on it.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2014 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your plate of Fish, Chips and Peas won't look like anyone else's and, with the amount you're hoping to grow, you're denying yourself several gallons of Peapod wine.

C'est simple, Monsieur, n'est-ce pas

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat May 31, 2014 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not hoping to grow, am growing. Not into home made wine at all, blagggh. If you want the pods blowin you are more than welcome to them. Hopefully we will be eating the pods too if i can get an answer on that. Don't fancy doing all that shelling. Bonjour!
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 5:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Wikipaedia entry doesn't mention any use of the pods (or shucks) but, by browsing 'pea pod recipes', I found http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/sauteed-sugar-snap-peas-recipe.html which fries sugar snap peas whole in their pods.

It seems you can eat them without harming yourself - it's just a question of how - but we find that, by picking the available crop each day and then shelling them sitting outside the back door in the evening sun before freezing, we keep on top of the job. Is your freezer big enough?

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

We have two chest freezers and a fridge freezer. But with the amount of veg we have growing this year storage will be a problem I think unless I can shift some of them on, by giving away/selling. There are almost 1800 pea plants sowed and that equates to a lot of shelling. The plan was to shell some and put them into portion sized plastic containers in the freezer and probably freeze pods too for the most part, taking up even more room. We just wouldn't have the time to shell every evening to eat as we need them plus they will all be ready in the space of the same few weeks. Left it too late for successional sowing, maybe next year.
At some stage soon I will be asking you good folks for ideas on winter storage for all types of veg and more importantly what doesn't keep.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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