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Price of a pea


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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
We have two chest freezers...

What is the energy rating on this like? A friend of mine had one of these, granted an old one, and he saved a fortune in his lecky bill by disconnecting it.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ha! Going by their age I would say it is non-existant and yes I do realise that there is an additional cost of keeping veg frozen as against buying it, but isn't that what we all do to some extent?
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 10:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I understand it the fuller the freezer, the less it costs to run so, with your multiple units, as you use up the various contents, you'll need to consolidate them as soon as possible into two, then one.

If this disrupts a 'system' of knowing what's where, you can always fill vacant space as much as possible with things like bread that you're going to need anyway. 'Psst' to a bakery delivery driver can often result in a tray of loaves at wholesale rate - and help his sales along.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2014 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are, what we call around here, a cute h**r blowin!
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
As I understand it the fuller the freezer, the less it costs to run so, with your multiple units, as you use up the various contents, you'll need to consolidate them as soon as possible into two, then one.

my understanding of the 'fuller it is, the cheaper it is to run' argument is that if you open the door of an empty freezer, all the cold air rushes out so when you close it, you've to bring the replaced air back from maybe 20 degrees to -15C; but there's much less air replaced when you open and close the door if the freezer is nearly full.

however, air has a very low specific heat capacity so would be quick to cool.
the heat change to drop 1l of air from 20C to -15C is about 40 joules; to bring water from 20C to ice at -15C is approx. 450,000 joules (if my calculations are correct)

essentially speaking, the freezer has a lot more work to do to pull all that heat energy out of the water, so the air replacement would be a negligible part of a freezer's work, i'd guess. unless you're opening it constantly.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

there are actually a load of myths relating to efficient use of heating or home appliances - e.g. it's better to leave your immersion on constantly, because you're never heating the water from cold; that one in particular is a complete myth.
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good points- one way of levelling off the void in the freezer is to bundle newspapers together (small bales of say ten Irish Times- the Indo just ain't good enough Laughing ) as you harvest, you just take the bales out and leave them aside til they're needed again. The paper is a good insulator so doesn't take a lot of energy .

Well done on the pricewatch Tagwex, fascinating to see the differences. I'm going all out on seedsaving this year- tomatoes, peas, runnerbeans, and rocket- I know they're not the most expensive part of gardening but all that accumulated smugness next spring will be great!
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It wasn't so much what they cost cos they are what they are. I was more interested in why there is almost three times the price for roughly the same quantity.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i would imagine supply and demand issues.
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 9:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Where to begin.... so here goes.

Price Variation:
Varieties will differ in price. Some aren't as plentiful, some are in greater demand; these two factors alone will drive up the price. I'm sure the "AGM" tag, should it be present, will also drive up the price (I certainly hone in on this). Then, are any of these seeds F1 hybrids. This will significanlty drive up price.

Pea Types:
To my mind, there are three types of peas: garden, snow and snap.
Garden peas are the bog standard pea; you eat the seed, not the pod.
Snow and snap fall under the mangetout banner, ie both the pea and the pod are eaten.
In the shops:
snow peas are usually sold as "mangetout". They have flat pods containing very small peas.
snap peas are usually sold as "sugar snap peas". They have rounded pods containing pea-sized peas.

My Potatoes wrote:
tagwex wrote:
We have two chest freezers...

What is the energy rating on this like? A friend of mine had one of these, granted an old one, and he saved a fortune in his lecky bill by disconnecting it.

I think he said it saved about 60 per bill by disconnecting it. So if you're growing peas and freezing them to save money, get that calculator out again. 360 will buy a lot of frozen peas from the Jolly Green Giant in a year.

Usage of fridges and freezers:
I don't know what the case is with freezers, though it probably doesn't apply, but with fridges they should never be more that 2/3 full. To put it another way, they should be the opposite of fridges in college accomodation or house-shares. That other third of space is required for cold air to circulate. Without it, some items will retain heat and may go off.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are a mine of information my potatoes. Thanks.
Just checked the packets, no F1's and no AGM labels.
Those in demand being a higher price I can understand, otherwise known as profiteering, but they wont catch me next year as I deliberately picked no F1's so as I could keep the seed.

We were thinking of eating the pods too, save on the shelling (I have 1700 + plants), they will hardly kill us will they? Will shell some but not all.

The second freezer was only acquired a month ago, second hand and cost nothing, it hasn't even been plugged in yet and wont be until we have a surplus of veg to store. And yes, I am mindful of the cost of storing all this food as against buying straight from the shop, but then what is the point of having a veg garden in the first place, plus one of my hobbies will be gone?

One more query, one of the varieties, Suttons Sugar Bon, requires the peas to be sown in a double row whereas all the other varieties were to be planted in a single row. Why?

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
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Location: Cork

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
We were thinking of eating the pods too, save on the shelling (I have 1700 + plants), they will hardly kill us will they? Will shell some but not all.

The shells of garden peas are edible and will not kill you. However, there is a plastic-like skin on the inside and this is unpleasant. If you peel this off the shell can taste alright. But peeling this, well, is more cumbersome that the act of shelling.
I use my used shells for stock.

tagwex wrote:
...but then what is the point of having a veg garden in the first place, plus one of my hobbies will be gone?

Personally, I freeze almost nothing from the garden. For me the freshness of much of the produce is paramount. I've never frozen peas, but I've frozen the leftover shells (for stock).

tagwex wrote:
One more query, one of the varieties, Suttons Sugar Bon, requires the peas to be sown in a double row whereas all the other varieties were to be planted in a single row. Why?

I've no explanation for this, except to say that it's nothing to worry about. I've seen peas sown in triple rows, at the botton of a flat trench. Have a look at your packs, is the pea-spacing for the double rows more than for the single rows? Peas tend to be sown fairly densely so a double row rather than a single is not going to have them overcrowded.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK I must do a bit of research then into which are garden/snow/snap varieties and shell accordingly.
Our idea was to have our own produce available most of the year and one of the ways to have that is to use a freezer, you must only eat your own when it is in season only and buy for the rest of the year.
Oh I wasn't worried at all, just wondering why. The sugar bons, with edible pods, are sown 2" apart in a double row 6" apart. Whereas some of the others are 1" apart but 24" to the next drill, big difference.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE


Last edited by tagwex on Thu Jun 05, 2014 8:57 am; edited 1 time in total
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 5:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The tag line on my posts is accurate - I'm a total novice - but, for me, nature doesn't make seeds fall off their parent plants in any particular way so I can't see the need for the gardener to sow to a prescribed pattern. As with all such things, I imagine there have been 'experts' in the past who've sought to exert their authority by coming up with these procedures.

I use a broad hoe to draw out a shallow row, say 5'' wide. I then spread my annual packet of bought seed evenly along it. Having done that, I then get out what I've saved from the previous crop and go back over the row, spreading them as evenly as possible with the others. The result is a very thick row of pod producing plants that yield a lot of peas - some to eat immediately and some for the freezer.

In my simple way, that's job done and I see no need to be any more scientific than that.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2014 9:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could well have a good point there blowin. I am a rules and regs man, do what it says in the instructions to the letter. Well almost. Straight down the line and no grey areas. That's me.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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