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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

Question about Hawthorne


 
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Virtus
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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 6:15 pm    Post subject: Question about Hawthorne Reply with quote

I had asked previously on the forums about hawthorne as a hedging plant. However when I read up a little bit more and discovered about laying and pleaching, it seems that it might be quite a lot of work, not to mention years of grwoth, to get it looking neat.

Originally I thought about mixing hawthorne, blackthorne, and rosa rugosa, but now I'm not so sure. Will this mix give something presentable in 2-3 years? Would it be very bare in winter? Or would it be a good idea to go back to the drawing board..

I was hoping for a nice looking hedge, perhaps something native, that would be hardy and not require excessive maintenance.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have seen some very good hawthorn hedges, If you cut it as a hedge with a good batter you will never have to worry about laying or pleaching, just cut it as a normal hedge once per year in August. It will make a good dense hedge, stock proof and may retain some leaves throughout the year.
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Virtus
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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers Greengage,

Just another quick question, what kind of ratios would you normally mix the above plants in? Was thinking 40% hawthorne, 40% blackthorne, and 20% rosa in a double row.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 10:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might try some guelder rose, Vibernum Opulus, in place of some of the rosa rugosa. It often occurs in native hedges and is a good food plant for birds. It has great autumn colour, too.
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
I have seen some very good hawthorn hedges, If you cut it as a hedge with a good batter you will never have to worry about laying or pleaching, just cut it as a normal hedge once per year in August. It will make a good dense hedge, stock proof and may retain some leaves throughout the year.


You meant from the 1st of September of course Very Happy (Wildlife Act). I planted a hawthorn hedge when we moved in three years ago. It is now 3-4 ft in height and starting to thicken nicely. I broke the golden rule of planting the quicks and then cutting back the growth to encourage stronger shoots (there is a roadworks related hedge planted at the same time locally and I have to say my hedge is actually more established than it even though I just let the quicks grow). I'm not saying to do the same, just that I'm happy so far! I pull the weeds from around the base twice a year (I didn't put down any mypex or anything) and this ensures that the hedging plants grow thickly at the base.
I planted a mix of 70% hawthorn, 5% each of blackthorn, guelder rose, hazel and holly and the rest was some slightly larger rowan, wild cherry and crab apple (to ensure they will come through as standard trees). I found some honeysuckle and dog rose growing nearby so they are now in the mix (if that all totals 105% my maths teachers will sigh resignedly).
Of the many things that annoys me about us as people in Ireland is this desire to build a house and then in many cases rip out the hedge to leave a bare fence (in my case) or a (to my mind) boring single species hedge. I'm all about the wildlife and of all the things I have done in my garden, this hedge is the thing that I love the most. When I see the first nest in it, I may even shed a little tear (but in a manly way Laughing )
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you have a hedge in your garden and im not talking about a hedgerow i would cut it in August, Never heard of anyone prosecuted for cutting their hedges before september and if you read the act their are opt out clauses which you can apply to any situation, have you ever heard of anyone getting a felling licence either.
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2014 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah sure I know!- I suppose I'm making the point that my hedge IS a hedgerow and I would treat it as a nesting site for birds.

As for felling licences Rolling Eyes
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2014 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What is the purpose of your hedge? Is it just to border a dwelling house?
Laying is normally used to make a hedge stockproof. I haven't heard of pleaching hawthorn as it's a relatively slow growing tree that doesn't grow very high. Pleaching is quiet common with poplars. It's a bit like an elevated hedge, or a hedge on stilts. Google-image it and you'll see some examples.
I'm a fan of hawthorn hedges. Where in the country are you? There's a great example bordering Bushy Park in Dublin. The one downside is that the hawthorn flowers on new growth, so if you're trimming it, it'll never flower.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Prune it just after the flowers go off and it will flower on new growth next season, As for birds nesting,
Ok forget about sea birds and swallows and peregrines Laughing
Next we have robins they wouldn't be interested bluetits, coal tits , great tits naw.
Goldfinches, goldcrests, siskins, greenfinches nest over 3 metres high in fork of tree thats too high for your hedge
so what are we left with Blackbird, Thrush maybe a wren if its dense enough ok but they could be disturbed by feeding birds on the berries, what is the nesting density of these, I once saw a group (Flock, herd) of rats feeding on a hawthorn hedgerow. some food for thought.
I would not plant blackthorn as it suckers, young plants need minding if they are not to be suffocated by weeds such ad Gallium. hedge mustard etc.
How about posting some photos of location.
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, in my experience you will get any of robin, blue tit, coal tit or dunnock nesting in a mature hedge. I've also seen plenty of raptors picking off some of these birds from the selfsame hedges! Good for wildlife allround.
As my hedge/row is bordering a road I will be certainly letting it grow to 3m Laughing so that, along with the rowan etc will certainly provide sufficient cover for some birds...in time.
Not saying this is for everyone, just that it floats my boat Very Happy
Anyway, sorry- I'm sending the thread in another direction: yes it would be good to see some photos from the OP...
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