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Runner Beans


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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5188
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 4:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 2593
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin, I wish you well with your bean supports and I hope they work really well for you AND last for years.
As for me, I've just finished my giant 'cloche' intended to keep Cabbage Whites, carrot fly and other beasties off my veg. The frame is softwood, grown I know not where, the corner brackets and other steel fixings are zinc plated. The hoops are made from polyethylene water pipe and the cover is woven polypropylene, I think. The ridge pole is an imported bamboo. I have no idea of its true cost.
We do the best we can with the information and facilities available to us at the time.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5188
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 9:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey blowin! Do you think that if I were to cut down a few black willows would I be able to make wigwams for my peas that I have just sown this evening, 1200 of them and still more to go in tomorrow? Is the timber in willow suitable for the job? I have permission to go get some hazel rods but that is a few miles away, these are right next to me.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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baabamaal
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 28 Jun 2012
Posts: 98
Location: Bog of Allen

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 10:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you plant willow that is recently cut it will start to grow again- I had lengths of it put aside for a fence for the hen's run (cut in October, planted in March)- now happily sporting leaves! Easy enough to pull up once the peas and beans are harvested but don't forget about them.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5188
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No way, what a weed. It would be great if you could grow peas in the same spot, just leave the wigwams up permanently.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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baabamaal
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 28 Jun 2012
Posts: 98
Location: Bog of Allen

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think it was mentioned on another thread, but I can vouch for the rooting compound properties of willowbark soaked in water- the stuff is biblical in it's tenacity to life!
I take a bit of care with the bamboo that I buy- I take them out of the ground asap, dry them off carefully and store them dry. Most of them are 5+ years at this stage and they are fine. I'm pretty stingy when it comes to buying "consumables" for the garden!
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5188
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2014 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That reminds me of the line in Jurassic Park by Jeff Goldblum, 'where there is life it will find a way' or something similar. No point buying stuff when you can use what is around you for nothing other than a bit of work.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 930
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 5:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tagwex - I've actually used willow - saile round here - for the past two years perfectly satisfactorily BUT I've cut it in the winter and left the bundles on the garden until I've needed them a couple of months later. Not only is the sap down, as mentioned previously, but there's a certain amount of drying out while they lay on the garden. None of mine have sprouted.

I'm still pondering a 'pea' version of my (bean) STYX but, until that happens, I'm using a left over length of plastic covered wire border fencing (1m high) on the eastern side, with the willow sticks on the western side of the row. 'A' I only need half as many sticks and 'B', courtesy of three stout stakes supporting it, the border fencing stops the row leaning over when buffeted by our high SW winds.

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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5188
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2014 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know me by now, leave everything to the last minute.
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 930
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tippben - As you requested, this is the situation today. I've had to pinch the tops out of some of them as they've gone 'over the top' as you can see.

This is the best side as I made a mistake at the outset. Having a pile of farmyard, I piled some of it up round the central pole and added some lawn mowings, the intention being to provide extra feed. The actual result was that I created a haven for slugs and they devoured all the plants on that side, mostly the Cobras. Because I had to replant, they're not quite so well advanced.

In another couple of weeks the top half will have filled out and we should have a mass of red flowers.



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Greengage
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heres something interesting I heard on gardeners question time last week, One of the contributors questioned why her runner beans flower profusely but produce little crop. The answer was , We have very few native plants that are red, Most flowering plants which are red are introduced and in their native countries they are pollinated by birds our insects have not adapted to pollinate them, Ok you will have some success with the red flowering ones but if we had hummingbirds you would have a wonderful crop, The contributor was recommended to plant the white flowering variety.
Another interesting question was, Why do you usually find roses growing at the end of Vine rows. Think about that and if you want the answer i will tell you. This should probably be a different thread but since I saw the pic of the beans thought i would share it.
(Very clever people the French)
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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 930
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The core of what you say may, indeed, be well founded Greengage but I've never had any trouble getting good crops of red flowered runner beans. The crucial factor can be that you must apply a fine spray of water to the flowers to help them set. After all, the seed pod that we eat comes from a healthy flower. A normal disinfectant spray, thoroughly cleaned out, will do the job quite adequately.

Another interesting fact that I picked up the other day is that, by using fatter sticks the vines have a greater distance to travel en route to the top and a longer stem means more flowers and thus more beans. Logical but I've never heard it before.

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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5188
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
Why do you usually find roses growing at the end of Vine rows.


Is it to do with early disease detection that would turn up in the roses first, being more susceptible, then it could be addressed before the grape vines get too sick?

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 3131
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amazing what we can learn here.
Tagwex you can now sit near the top of the class, thats exactly what they said, roses do for vines what canaries did for miners. Clever clogs.. Laughing
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5188
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Jul 09, 2014 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1. Ha ha.
2. A little bit of knowledge and a little lateral thinking got me there.
3. If I am only near the top of the class then I do not have to bring in an apple for the teacher yet.
4. If I am that clever then you can retire as the resident fountain of knowledge knowing that your old position is in good hands!!!

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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