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Blight Warning: Sunday 18 May to Wednesday 21 May.


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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 10:34 pm    Post subject: Blight Warning: Sunday 18 May to Wednesday 21 May. Reply with quote

STATUS YELLOW

Blight Warning
Weather conditions conducive to the spread of Potato blight, are expected to occur, between now and Wednesday, with the eastern half of the country most at risk. There will be some limited opportunities for spraying.

Issued:Sunday 18 May 2014 21:00

http://www.met.ie/nationalwarnings/default.asp
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4167
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm ok then, no leaves above ground yet.
Obviously I am wrong but I thought there were never blight threats for another 2 to 3 months and earlies never needed spraying.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 8:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In times past when weather was more seasonal, i.e., sunny summers and wet winters, blight only struck in July and August.
Alas, in these days of climate change (wet summers 2007-1012 inclusive, winter 2013 not starting 'til mid-December) blight tends to strike whenever it wants. May is not early and there have been conditions conductive to the spread of blight in April.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Note to self. Buy blight spray. Dam expense and work that I wasn't planning on for a while yet.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, it's only a low level warning. I'm not going to bother spraying for this one. There's little closeness in the garden so I'm in the clear I'd say.
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Lius
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 191
Location: Ballinteer, Dublin

PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2014 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My first earlies are beginning to flower, they are Colleen's which have some blight resistance so I'm not going to spray. If I spot ant blight on the haulms I will cut the foliage off and lift the tubers.

My maincrop are above ground now also and they are Sarpo Axonia which have good blight resistance so I will not spray them either.

Fingers crossed Smile
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tagwex
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2014 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For what it will cost you is it really worth taking a chance after putting in the time and effort to get this far?
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2014 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
For what it will cost you is it really worth taking a chance after putting in the time and effort to get this far?

I agree whole-heartedly with you.
It's like the Pareto Principle. 20% of the effort will yield you 80% of the crop. That 20% could turn out to be the spraying that saves 80% of your crop.
Having said that, where I live it was not humid, the status was "yellow", and my crop wasn't long in the ground, so I didn't bother spraying.
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


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Location: Cork

PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2014 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This blight warning is no longer effective.
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Lius
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


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Location: Ballinteer, Dublin

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's not that I'm lazy, I don't see the point in growing your own if you are going to put chemicals on them like the supermarket vegetables.

I have not used chemical fertilizer, sprayed potatoes, etc. since I started my raised beds in 2011 and I have had no problems (other than bolting) and that's with very the compact spacing as per square foot method. Yields per plant are lower but the overall yield per m2 of ground is higher than traditional methods. Because everything is so close the veg plants crowd out the weeds too.
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


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Location: Cork

PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2014 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lius wrote:
It's not that I'm lazy, I don't see the point in growing your own if you are going to put chemicals on them like the supermarket vegetables.

Some people enjoy gardening. Some people are organic gardeners.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2014 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might have to change your philophosy Lius when you move to Portrane. There comes a point when you cannot lose a certain quantity. Small amounts yes but when you are growing enough to keep you and yours for the year you wont be taking any chances.
Did you see my PM a few days back?

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Lius
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 191
Location: Ballinteer, Dublin

PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@tagwex I checked my messages and there is nothing.

I plan to stay organic all the way in Portrane. I get cheap chemical laden veg in ALID already.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4167
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you have a large amount of spuds at some point you will have to spray for blight or else it will be famine times again!!!
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Lius
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 191
Location: Ballinteer, Dublin

PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do plan to have a large amount of spuds at some time and NOT have to spray for blight, that's the point of planting blight resistant spuds like Sarpo's. I'm working my way up to bigger and bigger plantings without spraying and so far I have had no blight issues.

You seem to be obsessed with chemicals tagwex, flora and fauna have survived in the wild for millennium without any intervention from man whatsoever. We just need to find varieties or selectively grow disease resistant varieties and ditch the chemicals. Chemicals are what is causing all the cancer in humans.
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