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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5065
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2014 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sarpo's may not be to everyone's liking. I am not obsessed with sprays at all. They are a necessary evil. I admire your stance on this. But for the sake of 6 to 8 blight sprays we have a large amount of our food supply secured for the year with a large financial saving. I don't think taste suffers. How else would the masses be fed? Remember the lumper. Not qualified enough to comment on cancer issues. We got potato blight for the last two years, it changes your attitude.
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ďItís my field. Itís my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!Ē

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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 5:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lius wrote:
...that's the point of planting blight resistant spuds like Sarpo's.

Don't forget that blight resistant varieties have relatively high resistant, not complete immunity. They can still get blight, just are less likely to do so.
Lius wrote:
Chemicals are what is causing all the cancer in humans.

The use of chemicals in horticulture and agriculture has only happened post-World War 2. Cancer existed prior to this.
There are non-chemical blight sprays, and organic blight sprays, available.

tagwex wrote:
Remember the lumper.

Probably the worst tasting potato there is.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5065
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Potatoes wrote:

Probably the worst tasting potato there is.


Never had the pleasure, but the point I was making was that if Lius doesn't spray once he develops his half acre plot then it could be famine times for him. A few spuds in a raised bed is an interest but one is not dependent upon it as they are easily bought, but if one has expended a lot of time, energy and money into getting a crop yield of a couple of tonne, get the blight and then have to go and buy the potatoes for the dinner then one would be sickened.

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ďItís my field. Itís my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!Ē

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh yeah, I know, I was off the point but I know what you mean. And the later it is in the season the more important it is to spray. Not because the blight is more vicious, but you've got a few extra months work put in and have more effort to lose. It's like sport, would you rather go a goal down in the first five minutes or the last five minutes?
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Lius
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 12 Mar 2009
Posts: 203
Location: Ballinteer, Dublin

PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see you guys deleted my last reply (dirty tricks ladís) so here it goes again from memory.

The famine was deliberate ethnic cleansing by the British occupying forces in Ireland, not a horticultural error. There were plenty of alternative grain crops in Ireland which could have fed the Irish but the British exported it all to try to starve the Irish out of existence.

If you diversify and plant different crops and different verities and allow a little extra to compensate for failures there is no problem going chemical free. If you are stuck in the mud and must have all your eggs in one basket i.e. all Rooster spuds and nothing else then you deserve the blight far more than the poor peasant farmers who were murdered by the British during the famine.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5065
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sun May 25, 2014 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

By a lonely prison wall
I heard a young girl calling
Micheal they are taking you away
For you stole Trevelyn's corn
So the young might see the morn.
Now a prison ship lies waiting in the bay.

_________________
ďItís my field. Itís my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!Ē

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5065
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2014 9:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the subject of spraying for blight. When I started this venture last year I was told by a commercial grower to spray every part of the plant, under and over every leaf and a 'swizzle' in and around the centre which I did. No wonder it took me over two hours to spray getting close to harvest time. This year I have more than doubled the number of plants. So I was thinking, the commercial growers don't go to that much effort with their tractor drawn sprayers and they seem to do OK as they just put a mist over the top. What to do, what to do.
_________________
ďItís my field. Itís my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!Ē

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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