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Help with front garden beds


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Good guy
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That was why I chose those plants for my roadside hedge! The kids used to sit on my fence, back in the day. Now the hedge is keeping their children at bay! Not that I dislike other people's children, of course, provided they don't sit on my fence or kick footballs into my flowers!
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 9:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

See, a forked tongue!
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

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mel.b
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to kinderedspirit for taking all the rocks I had dug out...I look forward to seeing updates of your new rock garden Laughing

Ended up with around 9 tonne of topsoil I think. I ordered 6 and the guy arrived with a truckload. The price he gave me was cheaper for the truckload than I was expecting for the 6tonne so I said 'yep, I'll take it!'. Most of it has gone into the front garden, however some of it has gone into a new garden bed in the back yard that my dad built last yr for me. I'm going to need another couple of tonne to fill that though.

I have a few blisters but I'm getting there now! Looking forward to getting some plants in this week Very Happy





Last edited by mel.b on Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great work, Mel. I planted barefoot yew, about 18" high, last autumn, to finish off the raised alpine beds. All the plants have taken well and so far they have put on between 2 and 3cm of growth, so I've started nipping them back so they will soon join up. Would you consider yew for your hedge? Evergreen, easy to keep, red berries?
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 9:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are they not really slow growing?
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

2 to 3cm this season, so far. Not that slow.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good guy wrote:
Great work, Mel. I planted barefoot yew, about 18" high, last autumn, to finish off the raised alpine beds. All the plants have taken well and so far they have put on between 2 and 3cm of growth, so I've started nipping them back so they will soon join up. Would you consider yew for your hedge? Evergreen, easy to keep, red berries?
I love yew (and it's not that slow growing) but I would think twice about using it along a public foot path. Those (poisonous) berries are very attractive. Probably OK though if you keep it trimmed and not let it flower.?
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mel.b
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2016 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought I'd post these two pics, which were taken 12mths apart. I was complaining about the sarcococa confusa being slow growing, but when I look back at the photo actually I think it's done ok.

July 2015


July 2016


I also got the other side planted on Monday night Smile I ended up sticking with the sarcococa confusa for the hedging plant, however the nursery didn't have enough in stock. I also got:
- Callistemon citrinus 'Splendens'
- Kalmia angus tifolia rubra
- Weigela flordia 'monet'
- Hypericum x moserianum 'tricolour'
- Hebe Pink Candy
- Fuschia magellanica 'veriscolour'
- Euonymus fortunei emerald gaiety
- Grevillia (not sure what type, couldn't find the tag)
- Catmint - Nepeta x faassenii
- Malva moschata
- Cosmos
- Geranium Sue Crug
- Argyranthemum Maderia

There's a bit of a nod to my home country in there Smile






I got another Argryanthemum after the photos were taken to balance out the front. Now just to get the bark in and the plastic will come up when I do.

How soon is too soon to plant daffodil and tulip bulbs? I'd rather get them in before I put the bark down, but not if it means the bulbs won't flower.


Last edited by mel.b on Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2016 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking good mel, looking good!

The daffs can go in September, or whenever they start appearing in the shops.The tulips as late as November as long as the ground isn't frozen.

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 09, 2016 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mel.b wrote:
Thanks to kinderedspirit for taking all the rocks I had dug out...I look forward to seeing updates of your new rock garden Laughing

Ended up with around 9 tonne of topsoil I think. I ordered 6 and the guy arrived with a truckload. The price he gave me was cheaper for the truckload than I was expecting for the 6tonne so I said 'yep, I'll take it!'.



Whew! There was a lot. You must have great biceps, Mel. Smile Smile Up the Wallabies! Smile
It took two runs in the van (and it's a Renault Master) to clear the lot. The smaller ones I dumped into the farmyard of a farmer friend of mine. He'll use them for filling around cattle troughs. The bigger ones I'll use for a new rock garden bed under my Blue Cedar and also for a small rock garden I'll be doing for a friend of mine in Clare. (So some of the rocks will be staying in Clare.) Smile

My farmer friend is also giving me some really big rocks in one of his fields. A couple weigh at least two tons. We have to take up a tractor first, turn them over and see if they are suitable. (visually pleasing). Dunno how I'm going to manoevre them into place in my garden. Sad My two scaffolding poles are already bent. Sad

My estimate of 8 tons (allowing for 4" of settlement) was about right then. Smile

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A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
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mel.b
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2017 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So the days are getting warmer and longer and I'm back into the garden.

I noticed this morning that the grevillia I planted last year is not doing well. What do people think - will it come back or not?


Plans for this year are:
1. Finish off the front garden bed I started last yr. I got another 4 Saracoccoa tonight which should almost finish off the hedge against the wall and then I can put the rest of the bark down. i also need a few perennials to go in and a border flower. Later in the yr I will plant bulbs as I didn't get that done last yr. I would have preferred to put the bulbs in before doing the bark, but I'm not going to wait months to do the bark (actually hoping to do it this weekend).

2. My dad built me a garden bed in the backyard where I had an awkard bit of lawn. I've done nothing with it since it was built so I need to tidy that up and get it going. I've got top soil arriving next week and plan to pick up plants at the Clare Garden Festival at the end of the month. I'm not sure what I want to plant yet - maybe some climbers to go up & hide the fence and then a range of different periennals to give colour.

3. I have a very small narrow garden bed on the edge of my patio. My work colleagues gave me a rose a few years ago after my nana passed away and I planted it in this area. I'd like to turn the rest of this garden bed into a little rose garden with scented roses.

4. The area I did around the oil tank needs attention. The Laurel has done really well, but not anything else. Partly because i think my dog thinks it's his territory and will lay (and dig!) in there, but also because it's down the back of the yard it just gets a bit neglected. I'm thinking of maybe putting carpet roses in there...hopefully that will stop Cooper from going in there as well.

If I get all of that achieved I'll be happy and the backyard will start to look better as well. Also, to the side of my house I have a long wide strip that is again covered in pebbles. I'm not going to get rid of these (have learnt my lesson!), but was wondering if there was another ground cover that could be recommended? The area wouldn't get a lot of light as it is between my house and the one next door.

I'll keep this post updated as I make progress.


Last edited by mel.b on Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:14 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Ado 2
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thr Grevilla stems look alive. Scrape one with your nail if its green its ok. It looks like it could do with a feed and maybe water. As for a creeper The vinca minor is a colourful plant. Periwinkle i think its called it has a lovely purple flower. Look it uo
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mel.b
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Ado, I'll look at the periwinke.

So a productive day had today in the front garden...

Before



After:


Last edited by mel.b on Sun Aug 27, 2017 6:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good day's work!

Periwinkle comes several colours, the regular 'blue' (purpley blue), lilac, purple, pink and a lovely white. Very Happy

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your Grevillea needs acidic soil and will not do well in your extremely alkaline soil.

If you wish to save it, dig it up and put it in a pot filled with ericaceous compost..

A good ground cover for pebbles in poor light is Ajuga, the purple variety.

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