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Garlic already yellowing


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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 913
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kim - I regularly grow leeks, mainly because they over winter and provide useful off season veg, but have never considered saving seed. Any tips on how you do it, please?
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Kim
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 17 Jun 2014
Posts: 131
Location: Co. Wicklow

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 8:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Disclaimer....I am a garden cowboy, I have no horticultural education, I learn through the art of doing! so this is just what I do...

The usually seed saving rules apply.
Save seed from an open-pollinated variety (F1 hybrids don't come true to type). Save seed from healthy strong plants with characteristics you want. (If it bolts early you are propagating that trait).
Leeks will cross-pollinate with other leeks so best save seeds from one variety each year.
Leeks suffer from in breeding so they need to have lots of other leeks for bees to pollinate. One suggestion is that 30 flowering plants are needed to maintain vigour. I think I have about 15 left in the ground now (and some years less) so my leek seed does degenerate but I usually buy seed every few years (usually after a bad summer). With leeks I just keep seed so I don't have to buy it so much.

I leave in situ several good quality leeks. Flowering leeks benefit from support. I follow leeks with runner beans in my crop rotation so the leeks benefit from the support erected for the beans. Request a good summer from the weather Gods.

After flowering the seeds form, before they all fall out cut stems and place flower heads in a large paper bag to finish drying. Leave this in a warm airy place until the seeds fall out. Then store the seeds away somewhere dry and cool.

Leeks have wonderful flowers for the bees.

As I am new here, apologies if I have thread hijacked, not sure how much you all keep to topic.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 5142
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kim wrote:
Disclaimer...

As I am new here, apologies if I have thread hijacked, not sure how much you all keep to topic.


No disclaimers allowed here, what you write you are accountable for!!!!

Cannot blame you for going off topic, you only answered a question that you were asked. Sure that blowin is always going off topic, aren't you blowin?!!!

That's a great bit of info, in the last few days I have found out how to save strawberry and leek seeds. This next bit is not off topic at all, no, no way. Last year I managed to get a few extra strawberry plants by putting the runners into pots buried in the soil, is this a better method than using the seeds?

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Blowin
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
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Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many thanks, Kim. I'll leave a few behind this year and let them flower - not something I've ever seen before.

Yes, Tagwex, it was me that did a Schumacher and went off piste - but with a far better outcome?

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Kim
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
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Location: Co. Wicklow

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I managed to get a few extra strawberry plants by putting the runners into pots buried in the soil, is this a better method than using the seeds?


I've only ever grown the alpine/wild strawberry from seed, and that only once. I've been dividing it and transplanting self-sown seedlings ever since.

I leave the seed sowing of strawberries to the birds!

I have never had any trouble growing or propagating June bearing strawberries, the trouble comes with getting the fruit before mice, birds and slugs! I usually just dig up some of my runners in late summer, if I think of it. I imagine it would be even better to direct the runners into pots as they would go straight into fresh soil / compost.
Oh if there were only 10 times more hours in the day I might just do more things the "proper" way! LOL.
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spideog
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2014 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does 'scrape' mean the garlic has bolted and produced a 'flower'. If yes are you all suggesting that you cut off the flower?
Is the 'rust' you are talking about the yellowing leaves? I presume you are saying these can be ignored.
Thanks for the advice.
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Kim
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
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Location: Co. Wicklow

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scape, yes the flowering top/stem. Yes remove the flowering tops as soon as you see them to help bulk up the bulb.

Yellowing is completely normal and indicates the energy from the green tops is going down to help swell the bulb.

Rust is really rusty looking, LOL! rich yellow spots, very distinctive.
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tagwex
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Joined: 23 Feb 2010
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 12:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is that yellowing applicable to onions too? I have a few varieties sown and one in particular has gone yellow, I think it is the sturon variety. All the others are green leaved.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

we started lifting our garlic a week or two back - a lot of the leaves had started to develop rust spots, but the bulb is fine.
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Kim
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
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Location: Co. Wicklow

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 2:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
Is that yellowing applicable to onions too? I have a few varieties sown and one in particular has gone yellow, I think it is the sturon variety. All the others are green leaved.


I don't really know if that is normal or not. Yes the onions do die back. The tips start to yellow and quickly turn whitish. I suppose one variety could be maturing earlier than another? or could be a little stressed, it has been a very dry month.

Garlic does yellow and there is still good strength in the stems after yellowing when it is ready to lift, onions tops tend to shrivel to nothing.

My elephant garlic is still fairly green but the regular garlic (which has a lot of rust) is ready to pull.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just checked and it is the Sturon that have yellowed. The other variety is Stuttgarter which is twice the height and a healthy green. Both sown the same day and in the same bed.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Kim
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
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Location: Co. Wicklow

PostPosted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only have the one variety outdoors and I'm not even sure what they are. They are still green whereas the potatoe onions in the tunnel are starting to die down.
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Dirt Digger
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Location: Raheny, Dublin 5

PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dirt Digger wrote:
my Garlic not only scaped very early but was also walloped with rust this year, as indeed was a lot of the other plot holders' garlic... I lifted mine last week, and though not brilliant I have some for use. It seems garlic which has rusted wont store too long at all, but, it is still edible, so we'll use what we can while the stock holds...


from one of my postings last summer...just goes to show...
this week we used the last of those onions and garlic harvested last June and July: a full 7 to 8 months later, and there I was bemoaning last summer's rust whack...
this year's garlic been in bed since 24th January, Germidour and Marco, and we've sown some onion seed in flats also, so we'll see how she goes this year Mr. Green

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Kim
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Our garlic is still perfectly good to eat despite the really bad rust last year. The cloves were a little smaller than usual, that's all. We are getting to the end of our big onions but still have loads of potatoe onions left.
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Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 12, 2015 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Garlic never does well for me always small cloves maybe its me or soil or wrong varieties, Still have onions from last season kept them inside rather than the shed, This year planting Stuttgarter giant from seed rather than setts. Also planting Sharpes express and Aran pilot both earlies, All spuds from last season gone, Grew Kestrel really nice potatoe and lovely colour also grew Sarpo mira very big potatoes and blight resistant. Also going to try Sweet potaotes anyone ever grew them maybe i should go to vegetable thread for this.
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