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Help identifying this tree please


 
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cocobeanie
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 12 Apr 2014
Posts: 4
Location: Wicklow

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 8:06 pm    Post subject: Help identifying this tree please Reply with quote

Hi there,

I am new to Irish Gardeners. I would consider myself a novice gardener. I started out planting vegetables etc in pots when I lived in an apartment but have since developed a love of flowers, plants and trees. Moved into a house about two years ago and this lovely tree was already there. Wondering if you could help me to identify it. I will attach a few pictures.

Thanks.



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Silver surfer
Rank attained: Native hedgerow keeper


Joined: 25 Feb 2010
Posts: 485
Location: PERTHSHIRE. SCOTLAND. U.K.

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the forums cocobeanie.

Looks like Salix sp...a Willow tree.
These are the male flowers...called catkins
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cocobeanie
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 12 Apr 2014
Posts: 4
Location: Wicklow

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 9:17 pm    Post subject: Thank you Reply with quote

Thanks a million Silver Surfer.

I thought it might be some kind of willow tree alright. I have a book on identifying trees but couldn't make up my mind so thought this was the best place to find out for sure. I will be tormenting you all with gardening questions now that I have finally joined this website, instead of just reading posts!

Very Happy
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tagwex
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Joined: 23 Feb 2010
Posts: 4172
Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome along.

Beware, high water intake so will dry up the ground and cause subsidence to your house in the wrong type of subsoil.

_________________
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cocobeanie
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 12 Apr 2014
Posts: 4
Location: Wicklow

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 9:28 pm    Post subject: Subsidence? Reply with quote

Thanks tagwex.

It was a young tree in the centre of the garden when I bought the house and I moved it out of the way into the border near the wall! It is not near the house but possibly could cause me problems at the wall. Do they grow very big? Sorry if I am asking stupid questions here but as I said, I am very new to gardening and find myself wanting to know everything about every plant in my garden!!

Thanks.
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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another problem willows can cause is that they can block drains, if the drains are not well constructed. I don't think subsidence is likely unless you are on a clay subsoil. But I may be wrong. Willows do support a lot of wildlife, so they are good to have.
If you think it is getting too big, it will probably coppice well and make a useful feature.
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tagwex
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 23 Feb 2010
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2014 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are not wrong good guy, any subsoil liable to shrinkage will cause subsidence. Others to watch out for are pear and cherry trees, all at the top end of water uptake. Fibrous roots will get in anywhere they want to, no matter how well the drains are constructed - have had to investigate many a case. General rule of thumb is to keep the tree 2.5 times its mature height away from foundations on the wrong sub soil.
Word of warning, you are also liable for any damage caused to neighbouring properties by YOUR roots.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 3:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would remove the tree as its more problems than its worth in a small garden, If you live in a two story house it will even grow in the gutters if you dont clean the regularly. Better tree would be Amelanchier, mountain ash or Malus.
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Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2014 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are absolutely right, Greengage. The only willows I would plant would be the ones which (but not in a small garden) have well coloured stems when coppiced.
I'd consider a holly - they can work well and are easy to keep within bounds.
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cocobeanie
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 12 Apr 2014
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Location: Wicklow

PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2014 9:01 pm    Post subject: Thanks Reply with quote

Thank you all so much for your helpful replies. I think I will take it up. Just doesn't seem worth the hassle. Would welcome all recommendations for small trees to replace it. I would like to try transport it to a friend's garden (she has a huge garden) and wondering when the best time of ywar to do this would be? I know it may die when we disturb the roots but it is worth a try....

Thanks again to everyone.
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Sive
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2014 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could try transplanting it any time in the winter when it has no leaves. I would recommend an Amelanchier as a lovely tree for a small garden ( check previous threads on this subject )
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Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2014 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another excellent tree for a small garden is Acer Griseum. It has lovely spring foliage, great autumn colour and wonderful papery, bronze/mahogany bark all winter. But it is expensive and slow-growing.

I have a Malus Red Sentinel near my front door. It is just finishing flowering and will have good autumn colour. Most years it is covered in a mass of decorative little red apples that stay on the tree all winter. Great value.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Transplanting that tree will be a lot of careful digging. Thankfully, it's unnecessary. Willows like that (probably a Salix alba variant) are usually grown from cuttings. Just cut the tree down when dormant, and bury the stem a couple of feet in the ground in its new position, securing it with a stake and tree tie. You could even cut it up smaller and grow lots of them. Then you can dig and hack up the remaining roots without having to worry about damage to the root ball. I have grown willow cuttings in buckets of water from summer prunings, so don't be scared.
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