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Newzealand flat worm?


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Slave77
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 2:03 pm    Post subject: Newzealand flat worm? Reply with quote

So out forking through removing pesky weed roots today and came across this.... Is it flat worm? Ground very damp clay which I am going to condition.... The joys of gardening Rolling Eyes


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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like it to me.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You may call St. Patrick back to banish them!
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Slave77
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks My Potaoes, just as I feared. For all the good he would do tagwex. Found another little bugger too and left him on the spade to go get the bag that I had this fella in and when I came back he was gone Twisted Evil guess I might find him tomorrow. Also found what seem to be eggs..... Grrrr I hate it, just when you feel like you are making progress then Mother Nature whips the smile off your face Mad
Still I did find some earthworms in the same spot too, so maybe it's not too big a problem....... One can hope!
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just kill every one of the b.....s that you see and squash the eggs, too. I killed one only yesterday. I only have earthworms up to about 2 inches in length these days. All the big ones are gone. And I give the worms every encouragement in how I garden.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2014 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did he not banish all the snakes out of Ireland?
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

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Slave77
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 8:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No tagwex I think he drowned the Shamrock Laughing

Good guy how do you get rid of them? I read that you can only really kill them by burning them... If you chop them they grow into new ones? I did find some earthworms a couple of quite big ones, and I hope now that when I dig in manure and compost that the earthworms will increase.
I have that bugger in a ziplock bag since yesterday and he's still alive, galvanise bucket and small fire later Twisted Evil
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 9:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the Irish in general have done a good job of drowning the shamrock themselves on a regular basis.
After chopping them up they regenerate? Has to be an old wives tale, although thinking about it I know that an octopus and some lizards can regenerate missing limbs so maybe.
As to how to get rid of them, I believe there is no chemical way of doing it as that will also kill the native earthworm too. Lay hessian sacks/polythene sheeting on the ground and check regularly, I suspect that pouring salt on them may kill them, boiling water will surely work. Another alternative is to find a source for the beetles that eat them and buy them in.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Slave77
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 10:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
I think the Irish in general have done a good job of drowning the shamrock themselves on a regular basis.
After chopping them up they regenerate? Has to be an old wives tale, although thinking about it I know that an octopus and some lizards can regenerate missing limbs so maybe.
As to how to get rid of them, I believe there is no chemical way of doing it as that will also kill the native earthworm too. Lay hessian sacks/polythene sheeting on the ground and check regularly, I suspect that pouring salt on them may kill them, boiling water will surely work. Another alternative is to find a source for the beetles that eat them and buy them in.


A legacy from St Paddy perhaps along with the snake banishing Wink yes, if you notice in the photo there is also a small segment of one, it was still moving Mad read lots of accounts from people and some say boiling water don't work either... Burning is COMPLETE destruction and I shall take IMMENSE pleasure in the task Evil or Very Mad am not prepared to take any chances. Do you know which beetle eats them? More research
Very Happy
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i cannot see any stuation where a flatworm would survive boiling water.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 12:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found this on a website.

The flatworm can survive periods when no prey are available by using a process called 'degrowth': parts of organs are gradually lost and cells become smaller. This remarkable process, found in many species of flatworm, is reversible when food becomes available. As a result, the flatworms are able to persist for long periods without food and in areas with very low earthworm populations making any recovery by the earthworms much slower.

5. Flatworms, farming and the natural heritage

5.1 Effects on farming

If earthworm populations are reduced in natural habitats there may be both direct and indirect effects:
1. Direct effects on other animals

Many vertebrate species feed on earthworms including amphibians, a number of mammals such as moles and shrews, and a wide range of birds including songbirds and rooks. In addition, there are many invertebrates which feed on earthworms including predatory slugs, leeches, beetles and parasitic flies. Some of these species are more dependent on earthworms than others and the impact of the flatworm will depend upon how far earthworm populations are reduced and what alternative food sources are available. If the reduction is not too severe these other earthworm predators may be able to coexist with the flatworm, albeit in reduced numbers. Native terrestrial flatworms might also be affected by competition or predation.

7. Methods of Control

7.1 Reducing spread
The most important action at the present time is to reduce the spread of flatworms in plant containers This requires strict hygiene in nurseries and gardens, especially for soil which is known to be infected. If possible, plants should be planted with bare roots or from seed into clean soil. Some treatment is possible for infected plant pots: immersing pots in water overnight may make most of the flatworms leave the pots allowing them to be captured. However, any egg capsules will remain in the soil.

7.2 Chemical
There are no approved chemicals for the control of these species. Research is continuing on possible pesticides. However, there are two main difficulties: firstly, finding compounds that affect the flatworms but not earthworms, and secondly, finding a method of applying any chemical to the flatworms hidden in the soil or beneath objects on the soil surface.

7.3 Biological Control
Native British predators such as ground beetles and rove beetles will eat the New Zealand flatworm. However, since they are confined to the soil surface and coexist with relatively healthy populations of flatworms in central Scotland they are not likely to have a significant impact. Several natural enemies are known from New Zealand. However, little is known about their biology and they are unlikely to be specific to the one species of flatworm. As a result, it could be difficult to find good biological control agents that attack only the target flatworms.

7.4 Trapping
The most widely used technique to control the flatworms is trapping under tiles, weighted black plastic sacks and similar objects. Anything with a smooth surface that creates a damp dark area on the soil surface is likely to attract the flatworms. These traps' are checked every few days and any flatworms can be removed and killed. They can be killed by squashing them or by dropping them into hot or very salty water. Any containers must be sealed as they are adept at escaping through surprisingly small gaps.
There have been no studies into the effectiveness of this method in reducing the populations of flatworms.

There several companies to be found on the net that will sell you natural predators, buglogical being one.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great info, Tagwex.
My preferred method of destruction is the immediate application of a boot, on a hard surface.
I lay traps but don't find that many. I suspect it takes only a few to decimate the earthworms in any given garden. Or that once they have done their worst, they decamp for pastures new.
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Slave77
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tagwex thanks that's good info. Good guy, I admire the strength of your constitution but am afraid it will be the boiling salt water or burning for me, just to be sure to be sure Laughing
Have a few of the beds done and am gonna weight some compost bags down and check them in morning and also the ones I haven't done to see if I find anymore. Pity they wouldn't eat the bloody vine weevil instead of the earth worms Rolling Eyes
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

its not as common as we think but I notice your from Mayo so yes probably is one.
http://www.mayonews.ie/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10534:nature-new-zealand-flatworms--the-earthworms-enemy-&catid=50:outdoor-living&Itemid=144
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Slave77
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 25, 2014 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
its not as common as we think but I notice your from Mayo so yes probably is one.
http://www.mayonews.ie/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10534:nature-new-zealand-flatworms--the-earthworms-enemy-&catid=50:outdoor-living&Itemid=144


Ah thanks Greengage, that makes me feel loads better!

@tagwex, tried to look at buglogical.com but after reading Greengage's contribution I have the heebeejeebees. Think I need a glass of wine Wink [/quote]
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