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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Has anyone tried transplanting wild garlic?


 
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 27 Feb 2013
Posts: 307
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2014 7:26 pm    Post subject: Has anyone tried transplanting wild garlic? Reply with quote

I was wondering if any members have tried transplanting wild garlic, i.e. from the wild into their veg gardens? What would be the best time of year to do so? Any pitfalls? Any advice?
Thanks.
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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
Posts: 897
Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2014 5:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could do it, after flowering. It proliferates rapidly, so can be a bit invasive. It's only the leaves that you eat, before flowering, so if you have a stand near you, I don't really see the point. It's also illegal to dig up wild plants.
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Rob12
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just make sure you keep it in a tub because otherwise it will take over your garden. It does spread like crazy. If you lift some (with landowner permission - digging up roots is a no no), take it soil and all in a clump. The roots are easily damaged.
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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2014 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or you could wait until it sets seed and then sow the collected seeds. That's what I did with bluebells that grow on the lane to an old graveyard near here.
They really are very invasive though, so be careful where you plant them.
When I was a young lad, I discovered some growing in the shade of a row of beeches, beside a path leading up the hill to my secondary school. A few mates and I would cram our mouths with leaves, give them a good chewing and then go into class and fumigate the other lads. Great crack!
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Wes
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 13 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 28, 2014 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Same opinion as other replies, it takes over.
My neighbor put them down in her front garden about 7 years ago, now theyre all over her garden AND out the back too! Now, she doesnt manage her borders like she should, so shes part to blame. It looks awful though, apart from flowering.
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