Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices

Cooked food composter


 
Most Recent Posts funny
Last post: tagwex
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Ado 2
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
crosseyedsheep
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 147
Location: Leitrim

PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:13 am    Post subject: Cooked food composter Reply with quote

Hi,

I've been looking for an inexpensive (and hassel free) method to compost cooked food while eliminating problems with pests. I had ruled out wormeries due to issues with worms dieing off due to thermal conditions etc. I came across a post on a forum where someone described how they had buried a perforated steel bin where the waste broke down due to anerobic or erobic activity. Sounded interesting but I couldn't find the post again, I found this however:

http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/8890/diy-food-scrap-digestercomposter

I'm not sure about his theory about the worms being able to get in and out, I think it's more likely that it will break down the food by erobic bacterial activity without the aid of worms. I noticed that he has a comment at the bottom regarding standard composting practice i.e. not adding cooked food etc. But I think this could work for cooked food and I'm going to try it (for cooked food only as I have a composter for peelings etc). It probably will attract pests but they won't be able to get access as we have a cat and 2 terriers to deter the pests anyway so not too concerned there. Now all I need to do is fins a steel bin as they all seem to be made of plastic these days.

So, Does anyone have any thoughts or feedback?

_________________
Xeyedsheep
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
Posts: 896
Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Firstly, what kind of food are you cooking? My wife and I are mainly vegetarian, and add cooked food to our normal compost with no problems. The main problems if you are trying to compost meat, fish, dairy etc is that they are broken down by maggots, or by other animals eating and excreting them. We don't put fish remains into it except in the winter months because of the smell.

If you bury a bin like that in the ground, and make sure that cats, dogs, rodents etc can't get in, and chuck your food waste in it, it will eventually rot. You will get flies and smells.

I would concentrate on either not cooking too much food, or making better use of leftovers. The only thing that is dodgy to eat again is shell fish.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
crosseyedsheep
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 147
Location: Leitrim

PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The cat and the dogs take care of the meat scraps. It's difficult to cut down on food waste when you have a bunch of picky kids. What I'm looking to use it for is things like breakfast cereals which haven't been finished, mouldy bread, mouldy cheese etc. things which I wouldn't feed to the dogs or cat (or birds) or put in the normal compost bin. I've had some experience of rats invading the normal compost bin before and I want to avoid anything which would attract them.
_________________
Xeyedsheep
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Good guy
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 2356
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just come across an ad for a 'hot composter' in the RHS Garden magazine. The ad says it is made of expanded polypropylene and incorporates a filter for smells and will take bread, eggs, meat, bones etc. Sounds interesting.
www.hotbincomposting.com

It's very pricy, but the site has loads of good info on hot composting. 50mm of insulation seems to be key. You any good at DIY?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
crosseyedsheep
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 147
Location: Leitrim

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 12:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
It's very pricy, but the site has loads of good info on hot composting. 50mm of insulation seems to be key. You any good at DIY?


I would be pretty handy at DIY, everything from woodwork to welding, but very little time as I'm working away from home at the moment. As you mentioned the hot bins and others like them are pretty pricy. Which is why I was looking at the buried bin.

_________________
Xeyedsheep
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
baabamaal
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 28 Jun 2012
Posts: 98
Location: Bog of Allen

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 4:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I put in two standard (heavy duty) composters into the ground. This is a hardstanding area (crushed stone that is compacted). I have had a couple of 'visitors' who managed to dig their way in but I added some poison into the bins and they died after a couple of days (I am really reluctant to use poison due the presence of birds or prey, including owls, in our area- thankfully the rats die in the composters).
Anyhow, it is working very well. I put in two composters even though there are only two of us in the house. I did this to ensure enough capacity and to avoid having to turn the waste. The process is mainly anaerobic as a result, although there is some aerobic activity at the top of the material. No smells so far (my wife eats meat, I eat fish) after the composters being in use for the last three years. I think of them exclusively as food digesters, not composters and only emptied them once in that time, due to me siting them incorrectly the first time. They get sun almost the whole day and there is no cover for rodents around them. This project is exclusively waste management and I'm very happy with it.
I compost all the garden waste separately and use it as a mulch and soil conditiioner.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
crosseyedsheep
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 147
Location: Leitrim

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
They get sun almost the whole day and there is no cover for rodents around them. This project is exclusively waste management and I'm very happy with it.


Sounds good, sounds like the steel bin is the way to go to eliminate the visitor problems.

I have 2 composters as well, they are made from a 1000L oil tank which I split in two. I originally had it half buried against an earth bank, but rats chewed their way in at a joint, the plastic is about 8mm thick.

_________________
Xeyedsheep
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
baabamaal
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 28 Jun 2012
Posts: 98
Location: Bog of Allen

PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, you could still use the composters. What I should have done was line the pit first with fine steel mesh (heavy duty). The compacted stone would really help- big rocks would be preferable.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)