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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

New Allotment first time grower


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Tawny Owl
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 30 Apr 2013
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 8:36 pm    Post subject: how the Allotment is going Reply with quote

Hi All,
I have managed to clear the whole plot, and thanks to the owner and his tractor it was all turned over there on Tuesday, I have covered the plot with some manure , but I am wondering can I plant anything now to get it going for next season.

Cheers.

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Sneachta
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could plant garlic, broad beans and maybe even some onion sets to get you started.
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

would it be a good idea to get some soft fruits (rasberry, loganberry etc) in the ground now considering how mild it is?
If you want soft fruit that is!
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Tawny Owl
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2013 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sneachta wrote:
You could plant garlic, broad beans and maybe even some onion sets to get you started.


I planted garlic in my back garden about 4 weeks ago and there are green shoots sprouting already, I know its mild but will these die as I was not expecting anything till about next March.

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Tawny Owl
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 8:16 pm    Post subject: Allotment now turned over Reply with quote

I have it all turned and manure laid all over the latest weather is not helping, but getting there.that's my Son finishing off levelling the soil.


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Greengage
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey there your not in walshestown by any chance.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Two things, no three, I see you have mastered getting photo sizes down, the 26 year old can handle a shovel and finally well done as you have done way more than I have so far. Fact is I have done nothing since September, keep meaning to but just cannot get around to it.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tawny Owl, plants like garlic, daffodils and many others seem to have some kind of anti-freeze in them. I've yet to see the new shoots of my daffs damaged even in some of the very hard frosts of a couple of years ago.
I would love to know how this works - any information from our scientifically trained contributors will be gratefully received! One of the great things about the website is the huge range of knowledge and experience available and freely shared.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 5:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In freezing weather water in the cells of the bulb may freeze but the cells will not be harmed. for many hardy plants, cold temperatures trigger starches in bulbs which in turn break down into glucose and other small molecules. This simple sugar or glucose, interacting with other small molecules, acts in much the same way as salt on a winter roads in freezing weather, The sugar in the bulb, like the salt on the roads, lowers the temperature at which water freezes. This chemistry helps to keep bulbs safe from freezing in the ground. Other factors that help keep soil temperatures within tolerable limits include an insulating snow cover and, a layer of mulch over the bulbs once the ground temperatures have dropped below freezing.
There is always someone interested in the useless information I have in my head.
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Tawny Owl
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 8:23 pm    Post subject: reply Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
hey there your not in walshestown by any chance.


Have not heard the name where is Walshestown located.

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Tawny Owl
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tagwex wrote:
Two things, no three, I see you have mastered getting photo sizes down, the 26 year old can handle a shovel and finally well done as you have done way more than I have so far. Fact is I have done nothing since September, keep meaning to but just cannot get around to it.


Yes and took on board the tips from yourself Ha, as this is mush much bigger than anything I every had to look after, what's best to plant, as I don't want to be say planting 50 cabbage and only use 20 is there a happy medium like 30 sets of onions so much beetroot and so on any pointers would be great, and again thanks for all the help.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What you sow is very much a personal choice based on your own eating habits and how many mouths there are to feed. I couldn't advise you on quantities you will just have to go with the flow and keep notes from each year. We have approx. 1.5 tonnes of spuds from last year but I have no idea how much we need during a year if you know what I mean. So I will increase or decrease the seed quantity accordingly this year. Looking at your plot maybe half should be the good old spud. Grow winter cabbage there once picked.

What I did was measure the length of the drills and work out how many plants would grow in each one according to the recommended spacings. You also need to take into account plant succession, getting more than one crop off of each drill. For example, I planted quick growing veg such as lettuce and radish in between the slow growers such as cauliflower and cabbage which can be as much as 24" apart. I also planted small stuff, i.e. spring onions, carrots, leeks and sweetcorn at two or three across the width of a drill to maximise return.

If you have too much of anything in particular, don't worry as someone will gladly take it off you!

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Walshestown near Sallins co Kildare along the canal or go to it from Digby bridge some good gardeners there.
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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 12:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage - thanks for the info. It's not useless at all. The more that people get to understand the way nature has checks and balances and other in-built mechanisms, the more they are likely to care for it.
Like I said in another post, it's great that this forum has members with such a breadth and depth of knowledge and experience. And that they are so generous with it!
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Margo
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Location: Summerhill Mayo Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Jan 09, 2014 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My goodness it does look good. Our garden looks like a mud-bath at the moment and no way could we do any digging as the hole would just fill with water.
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