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Native Irish Trees --- List of Trees Native to Ireland


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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Correction. Should have written further WEST.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2011 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/weekend/2011/0806/1224301914598.html
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DXOak
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 2011 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HI,

Just joined here because I have been interested in native flora and fauna for a long time. I have been growing native trees, shrubs and plants for a long time. I currently have in my garden:

x1 Hazel (3ft), x2 Crab Apple (6ft), x2 Grey Sallow (6ft), x1 Hybrid willow (Crack willow x Grey Sallow) 3ft, x1 Blackthorn (5ft), x3 common osier (x2 6ft, x1 5ft), x1 Sessile Oak (5ft), x1 Goat Willow (5ft), x2 Bird Cherry (x1 6ft, x1 5ft) and a 3ft elder. I am also growing common juniper from seeds and started that 8 months ago and still waiting for shoots, I know they can take a long time to grow from seeds though.


Anyway, I was looking at your list of native trees. Two came to mind that are not on your list, but I think they are ntavie (not sure on the elm though).

Small-leaved Elm (Ulmus minor) is one, not sure of its status throughout Ireland, but I believe in Northern Ireland, its only found in a few places in Fermanagh but not sure if its native or introduced. Another is Dark-Leaved Willow (Salix myrsinifolia) which I know is still found in parts of Antrim, a few sites in Co Down, but not sure where else.

Some say that common osier (Salix viminalis) is native but others are not sure, I have 3 in my garden because of their benefits to wildlife, but wasn't sure their status but I know its found in quite a number of places.

Also, I was informed that the Devon Whitebeam (Sorbus devoniensis) is native to parts of the east of Ireland.

Don't know if this counts today, but you could call Norway Spruce native, or at least one time you could as there has been evidence found to show they were native 100,000 years ago from finds dug up at differet sites in Ireland including cones found in Kerry and when BP were digging for coal in Antrim they found evidence of spruce trees from the ice age. (According to the book Flora Hibernica)

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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2011 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you once again, medieval knievel. Sad reading, but helpful to understand the issue nevertheless.
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Luis
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a question or two.

A book I read a long time ago: Pagan Celtic Ireland by Professor Barry Raftery makes mention of Maple pollen being found in a bog in County Longford dating to 2,100 years Before Present. The find was made during excavations of the famous Corlea Bog roadway.

I know that there are no Maple trees considered native to Ireland, although today Acer Pseudoplatanus is very common after having been planted in the island in the 17th and 18th centuries and Acer Campestre has also been planted extensively, but is not as common.

I also know that Acer Campestre is considered native to Britain, but Pseudoplatanus is not.

Does anyone know which one of these trees is likely to have been present in Ireland during the Iron Age? I am guessing that it was Acer Campestre. If so, why would it not be considered native if it has been verified as present in Ireland as early as 2,100 BP?

Any answers will be appreciated. Cheers.

-Luis.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i've seen a similar mention in 'woodlands' by rackham, just a passing remark. it was mitchell in UCG who found it, if memory serves.
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Luis
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Unfortunately, I have been unable to find that work about Maple. I have also not found any other info.

I also have doubts about Europaean Beech. I know it is considered non-native, but I wonder if it has been on the island for longer than currently accepted.

I know pollen records indicate that Fagus Sylvatica is 'native' to Wales and there are records of its presence in Northern Britain (i.e. Northern England and Southern Scotland) since the Iron Age (over 2,000 years ago).

My doubt comes from the Irish word for Beech, there being two words attested. One is FeŠ, which is clearly derived from Latin 'Fagus' and the other in 'Faibhile', which seems to be derived from the Welsh word 'ffawydden'. The old Irish name for the plains of Co. Carlow was "Magh FeŠ", which seems to mean "plain of beeches" .Latin and Brythonic only had influence on the Irish language during the medieval period and all this makes me think Beech trees must have been introduced at least since then, probably from Britain. Food for thought...
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i was talking to someone from the national museum recently who is very sceptical about the strawberry tree being native.
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Luis
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 4:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right... but these issues bring me to another question:

What makes a tree "native"? or "non-native"? to any area?

My understanding is that to be considered "non-native" or "exotic" it has to have been introduced by mankind and to be considered "native" it has to have been present since at least the Neolithic period (i.e. 6,000 years ago). That is the consideration in Ireland, but in other areas it is not so clear cut. In America "native" is anything which was present before European discovery of the continent.

But it seems to me that trees such as Field Maple, which have been in Ireland since at least the Iron Age (i.e. 2,000 years ago) if the findings earlier discussed are correct and are not invasive but naturalized could probably be viewed as native or at least naturalized. I don't know what the case is with Arbutus Unedo, but it does seem to be a more mediterranean species (i.e. it thrives in places like Greece and Portugal).
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

my understanding of 'native' is not the amount of time it has been here, but how it got here - so a bird colonising from abroad of its own accord would be considered native.
things are considered de facto native if they've been here since prehistoric times - as there's often no way of telling if they were artificially introduced or not, and would have been long naturalised anyway.

the strawberry tree is just part of a collection of flora known as the lusitanian flora, which come from iberia; the burren being one of their strongholds. one theory is that there was a landbridge up from iberia which allowed them to get here, but there is also a theory that irish and basque DNA are quite closely related, so the plants could have been brought in by colonising humans who migrated from what we now know as the basque country.
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Luis
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Basque country.... funny that you should mention that, because I am of Basque background myself. My ancestors migrated from Spain to this continent in 1939. Very proud to be Basque. Jaungoikua eta Lagizarra!
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 19, 2015 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

some photos i got taking down the leylandii at the end of the garden, last easter, and then just after planting with native trees, and a more recent photo from a month or two back.

the leylandii was about 12-15 foot tall, the full width of the garden (39 foot i think) and took up the last 12 foot.



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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would say that is a relief to be rid of those.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yep, and they've been drying for 18 months now so are about ready for the stove.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Similar story here. I have 5 trailer loads of them waiting to be cut up for next winter.
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