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Native Irish Trees --- List of Trees Native to Ireland


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mountainy man
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi and welcome, I recon it could be holm oak , I know that the leaves are variable from spiny to smooth edged , am sure someone else will have the difinative answer.
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kindredspirit
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Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had 5 holm oaks which I had growing from seed, nuts, whatever, in pots. They were about a foot high but unfortunately this winter has killed them. I reckon that if they had been planted in the ground, they would have survived but I had no place in my garden for them. They're a nice tree.

I had got the seed from Extremadura, which can get very cold.

I've 5 Carob trees, growing from seed from Extremadura in pots also, but it looks like this past winter has killed them too. I was looking forward to the Carob trees growing bigger. (I call them "The Black Banana Trees" ! )

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ramblinman
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks for the reply mountainy man but it,s not holm oak.i know that tree well enough,pass by one every time i,m in the park.there is only a small handfull of holm oak in the park maybe five i,ve encountered.the tree in the photo is a good bit smaller than holm oak and the trunk far more slender.the bark a fairly smooth light brown,the leaves are lighter in colour and softer than holm oak,they are also serrated unlike holm which i know can be spiny like holly.this tree is plentifull around that area of ross island.it wouldn,t be much bigger than than a good sized hazel tree which is also plentifull around there.it could be classed as a shrub like hazel but i think it grows a bit too big for that.


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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 9:00 am    Post subject: All responses to the Cloonmore postings Reply with quote

In the end I was advised (outside of this forum, as it happens, by a well known nursery near Nenagh) to plant field maple along the village verge. I believe the tree is native to the British Isles, though not specifically to Ireland). The attraction in the end was the seasonal colours, but more specifically, that they can be cut back. Already about 12 ft tall they will soon reach into the ESB wires if not coppiced. Because there are 20 trees in total this will require a cherry picker every couple of years to keep them looking uniform.

I have held back from posting a few photo's in order to allow for all the work "to take". In May I will upload before and after pictures.

Again, thanks for all the posts.

Cloonmore

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easyram
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ramblinman,

Maybe it's any of the Prunus sp? Maybe Prunus serotina?
I'm at work and have no tree books with me but just can't stop thinking!!!
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Celtiberia
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Location: Northern Spain, once celtic lands

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi
I think it's definitely a prunus - looks like prunus lusitanica. This species usually has thicker leaves, but those growing in the shade get larger and thinner.
It can't be prunus serotina if it's evergreen.

kindredspirit: It doesn't get that cold in Extremadura, unless you go to the "Sierra de Gredos" mountain range (Highest peak is 2592 metres or 8504 feet), but there are other areas in Spain where holm oaks experience -20ºC every winter without signs of injury. By the way all holm oaks growing away from the coast in Spain are a different subspecies(Quercus Ilex subsp. Ballota) which is better adapted to cold winters and dry summers, it has smaller and rounder leaves, glaucous and usually a bit blueish, especially on young plants.
You can see it here:
http://www.asturnatura.com/especie/quercus-rotundifolia.html
http://www.josepmguasch.com/flora/carrasca.jpeg
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hola. Que tal. Celtiberia.

¿De dónde es usted? Cantábria? o Galicia?

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Celtiberia
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Location: Northern Spain, once celtic lands

PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

¡Hola kindredspirit!
Soy de Santander, en Cantabria. Tengo una finca en las montañas, a 800 metros de altura, donde estoy plantando árboles. Creo que Irlanda es el país con el clima más parecido al que hay en mi zona (¡aunque aquí llueve el doble!), por eso entré en este foro.
Translation:
I'm from Santander, in Cantabria. I have a plot of land in the mountains, 800 metres high, where i'm planting trees. I think Ireland is the country with the closest climate to the one in my area (although it rains twice as much here!), that's why I entered this forum.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 19, 2011 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conduje a través de Cantabria hace algunos años. Es mucho más verde que Irlanda. Visitamos Santillana Del Mar. Su inglés es muy bueno.

I drove through Cantabria a few years ago. It's much greener than Ireland. We visited Santillana Del Mar. Your English is very good.

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Celtiberia
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Location: Northern Spain, once celtic lands

PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2011 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hola de nuevo,
Si has estado por aquí sabrás lo parecido que es a Irlanda. Tenemos prácticamente las mismas especies autóctonas, aunque también tenemos cerca otros climas bastante distintos con su flora característica.
Santillana es muy bonito, pero demasiado turístico. Me temo que yo no conozco Irlanda más que por internet, aunque sí he visitado toda la costa oeste del Reino Unido, desde Escocia hasta Cornualles, que en cuanto al clima es bastante parecido.
Tú también hablas muy bien español, ¿has vivido en España? Yo aprendí inglés en el colegio. Aquí en España es obligatorio estudiarlo, pero solo hasta un nivel relativamente bajo. Mejoré leyendo y viendo la tele en inglés.

Translation:
If you've been here you'll know how similar it is to Ireland. We have practically the same native species, although we also have quite different climates, with its particular flora, very near.
Santillana is very beautiful, but too turistic. I'm afraid I only know Ireland by the internet, but I have visited all the west coast of the UK, from Scotland to Cornwall, which climatewise is quite similar.
You also speak very good spanish - have you lived in Spain? I learnt english at school. Here in Spain it's compulsory at school, but only to a relatively low level. I improved by reading and watching tv in english.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hola Celtiberia,

Fuimos a las cuevas de la reproducción en Santillana.
Encantadamos Picos de Europa el mejor.

Hice solamente un cursillo del español de la tarde.

Miro la televisión muy, muy pequeña pero yo ha instalado otra televisión en un cuarto libre y la ha conectado con dos canales españoles, que miro siempre que tengo ocasión.
Desgraciadamente hay nadie en nuestra barrio que hable español.

Nunca he vivido en España. Pero he visitado el interior de Andalucía, de Extremadura, de Pais Vasco, de Cantabria, de Asturias y de Galicia.

Encanto el alimento gallego, el mejor en el mundo. También encanté el paisaje en Cantabria.


Translation.
We went to the reproduction caves in Santillana. We loved Picos de Europa the best.

I only did an evening Spanish course. I watch very, very little television but I have installed another television in a spare room and connected it up to two Spanish channels, which I watch when I get a chance.
Unfortunately there is no-one in our neighbourhood who speaks Spanish.

I have never lived in Spain. But I have visited the interior of Andalucia, Extremadura, Pais Vasco, Cantabria, Asturias and Galicia.

I love Galician food, the best in the world. I also loved the scenery in Cantabria.

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Garden Plans Ireland is going international!

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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 15, 2011 7:04 pm    Post subject: Irish Trees & other trees grown in Ireland Reply with quote

James, I know the Chestnut does not get a mention in your list of indigenous trees but I think it is a very well established sight throughout Ireland.

When I was a child (some 60 yrs ago) the three Chestnuts in our back garden were fully grown and so I can only assume they are the best part of 100 years old.

Last year they became quite distressed, with the leaves underdeveloping, dying off too early (especially on the side facing the prevailing winds) and the conkers were far less abundant than usual.

As they leafed well in March/April and then declined from May onwards I wonder if they were just affected by a very cold & dry May in our area?

However, I have heard of a disease spreading throughout Europe that could have the same effect on Chestnuts, as happened to Elms in the 70's.

Has anyone else experienced something similar - and importantly, can anything be done? (I did note that the fallen conkers germinated very well (which presumably is a good sign).

I would appreciate any comments. Our 3 trees are simply massive - and beautiful. It would be a sorry day if we had to cut them down.

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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

yep, there's a disease affecting horse chestnuts which has killed a fair few in the phoenix park as far as i know.

they were initially very slow to take them down, i think they were afraid of spreading the disease in the sawdust.
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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you medieval knieval. I would appreciate any other anecdotal information, especially if there is evidence of the problem moving further east.

I believe there is an air-borne disease and a seperate bug disease. I understand it started in Germany.

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