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Native Irish Trees --- List of Trees Native to Ireland


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Boland
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Location: Cork

PostPosted: Fri Aug 27, 2010 9:27 pm    Post subject: Natives Reply with quote

Is the Field Maple a native? I'm sure I read that somwhere? anyone?

While I'm all in favour of native species but if the wildlife value is good - ie the oft despised Sycamore is a good wildlfe habitat, second to oak and far better than Ash according to a coillte rep I once met - then surely it should be given a chance.

Also a lot of "native" stock you get in gardencentres are from Dutch or French seed stock (as are some if not most of our new native state forests), not sure you can be certain that its a native unless you go and gather from Killarney.... (don't by the way).

Besides, in the interglacials all European trees were native here at some stage, Silver Firs, Beech, Hornbeam, Norway Spruce, Chestnut etc, etc. better stop before I get going....

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Sive
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

According to Chris Baines in "How to make a wildlife garden" the Sycamore supports very few species of insect as do Norway Maples and Horse Chestnuts.
The best trees to plant in terms of variety of insect species they support are:
Oak (284) Silver Birch (229) White Willow (200) Hawthorn (149) Alder (90) Crab Apple ( 90+) Aspen Poplar (90+) Elm (80)Beech (64) Ash (41 )Rowan and Hornbeam (both 2Cool
Hope this gives you some ideas......
Not sure how the Coillte rep. could make that statement ....either he or Chris Baines have to be wrong.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 28, 2010 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry...gremlins at work..... Rowan and Hornbeam both support 28 insect species.
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Boland
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 29, 2010 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suspect the rep - I was planting a few acres at the time and there could have been a surplus of saplings - I remember they had to get Oak from abroad at the time as they were out of them.

Thanks for that reference to Chris Barnes - I''ve ordered it on Amazon - it will definately influence my planting decisions, interesting to see Beech so high and Rowan so low and I'll definately be putting a few White Willow slips this year beside the stream as opposed to Alder.

Thanks Again...

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preacain
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 15, 2010 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

conservation of the native trees is essential to our survival rermember that some Irish trees survived the mini ice age seeds should be collected and reproduced the fir plantations are a ruin native trees will protect and create a real dynamic future of sustainable real ecological developement with versatile production and versatile employment and a country ready to take on a future with roots in the ground!
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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 3:18 pm    Post subject: Creating a Feature Verge with Trees Reply with quote

Hello. I am new to the forum. There is a saying that the best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago! Because it is "late in the day" for me personally I am hoping to get it right for future generations to enjoy.

I am in the process of landscaping about 150yds of village road frontage. The location is rural Roscommon. So far I have cleared a one acre field and erected a 4 bar fence around the perimeter. When the ground is levelled it will be seeded and used as a paddock.

What I want to do next is create a nice grass border between the fencing & the narrow village road. At the moment the strip is a mixture of loose road gravel and a thin quantity of poor soil/clay/stones. The verge will be approximately 6' wide (perhaps 2-3 strips with a fairly large ride-on mower) and to finish it all off I would like to plant a series of small deciduous trees on this border.

As mentioned I am short of topsoil for the verge and intend to draw turf-mould from the bog and mix it with manure (it happens to be more horse than cattle, if this makes a difference) and just level it all with a rake and then seed. There is however much evidence of oil streaks from the new fencing.
And now the questions, and hopefully some help:-

Will the creosote deposit kill off any chance of getting grass established, or kill off any new trees?

Will the mixture mentioned above work, or must I find top-soil from some other way?

Do I spray weed killer a month before seeding?

And, what type of indigenous trees could I plant along the verge, at regular intervals, that would not grow greater than say 12-15' in height and 6-8' wide?

I do not want them to dominate. One side can encroach beyond the fencing (& ultimately may be eaten by the livestock), but the other side must not overhang the narrow village road by too much. I would like something that requires very little management. I am keen to try and keep everything indigenous, if at all possible. The ideal would be a tree type that would ultimately have a 6' high trunk, so that a mower could navigate round and below the canopies. I am imagining them being quite well spaced out, so that there will be a clear view between them across the fields. What soil there is is slightly acid & poor to drain in wet weather because of a VERY stoney clay sub-soil, the village being sited on the poorest of land between the bog & the start of the uplands. The trees will be in full sunlight, but exposed to all winds.

If all the native trees (I have studied the list on the website) have the potential to grow too large, would fruit trees be an option? Also, should I keep to one type, or alternate? I feel I will need about 15 trees. I also have seen a reference on the forum to a nursery in Birr, and depending on what is suggested ask whether this could be a cheaper (and better) option than a garden centre?

I do hope this is an interesting enough topic to draw some suggestions or advice.

Many thanks,

Cloonmore

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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about Rowans ? They may suit you well, and there are lots of different types to choose from.....and they're native too.
Have a look at this website.....I have used them and they are very professional:

http://www.futureforests.net/

Good luck with the project, and well done on working to enhance the entire community....you will give so much pleasure to everyone in the village.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:30 pm    Post subject: Re: Creating a Feature Verge with Trees Reply with quote

Quote:


As mentioned I am short of topsoil for the verge and intend to draw turf-mould from the bog and mix it with manure (it happens to be more horse than cattle, if this makes a difference) and just level it all with a rake and then seed. There is however much evidence of oil streaks from the new fencing.
Will the mixture mentioned above work, or must I find top-soil from some other way?


Go with topsoil.
If as you say whatever soil there is is slightly acid & poor to drain in wet weather then adding turf-mould is a recipe for moss.

Quote:

Will the creosote deposit kill off any chance of getting grass established, or kill off any new trees?


Possibly.
I'd skim that soil off, just in case.

Quote:
Do I spray weed killer a month before seeding?


The best time to sow grass seed in Ireland is between early April to late September, however, you must firstly carry out some vital soil preparation.

The first thing to look at is your soil depth, Most lawn grasses require a soil depth of 15cm (6 inches) to grow well. If your existing site cannot provide this, you must import clean soil which is weed-free and non-sticky to make up this level. Once you have the correct soil level you must then prepare that soil for seeding.

Ideally sometime between March and August you must "burn off" any unwanted growth across the whole of the site which is to become your lawn.

Read the whole grass seed sowing article here......... How to sow a lawn from grass seed in Ireland-Lawn Hints/Tips

Quote:
And, what type of indigenous trees could I plant along the verge, at regular intervals, that would not grow greater than say 12-15' in height and 6-8' wide?
What soil there is is slightly acid & poor to drain in wet weather because of a VERY stoney clay sub-soil, the village being sited on the poorest of land between the bog & the start of the uplands. The trees will be in full sunlight, but exposed to all winds.


I'd go with silver birch personally (Betula pendula) .
A bit taller than 12-15' eventually though.

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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you James for taking the trouble to reply. Personally I am not a great fan of Silver Birch. Our locality is dominated by both Birch & Willow. The information on preparing the soil is most helpful. I am sure I will be back with more questions on this subject.
Sive, I am now studying the possibility of Rowan. Many thanks. Cloonmore
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cloonmore
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you know whether Rowan can be cut back each year? I like the idea in a village setting to have a line of trees that can be pruned heavily each year to create fairly uniform canopies. The French do this everywhere: is there good reason why this does not seem to be adopted in Ireland?
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vincentdunne
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, Cloomore,
I applaud your project. It is good to see imagination at work in landscaping open areas.
Rowans should not be cut back. The heads of the plants are pretty neat and tidy anyway. The french usually use Lime (Tilia spps. e.g. cordata). This effect can look well, BUT be careful, it will need to fit in with the approach to an IRISH village. What is appropriate for France may not be such a good idea here.
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ormondsview
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Location: Kenmare, Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 9:42 am    Post subject: eastern redbud already in bloom Reply with quote

I was happy to see several Eastern Redbud in bloom in south Kerry already in Feb/Mar. They are attractive to bees which were already making a presence (huge stumbling bumblebees) have a modest growing size, heart shaped leaves so not too shady and dense and flower bright purple - almost like plum trees.http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/plants/plant_finder/plant_pages/11048.shtml
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vincentdunne
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2011 1:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Ormondsview,
I have not seen Cercis in flower this early in Ireland. Any chance of a photo?
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ormondsview
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2011 9:28 am    Post subject: pics of redbud Reply with quote

It should flower in April though I saw it at the end of February and early March only from a driving car. We also had camellias in full bloom so that might tell you if your area has as much warmth that early. It is short lived and part of the bean family say the references I came across. I cycled to Derreen gardens and along the way took pics of flowering gardens that have fairly nice blooms of camellias so I planted a pink one and started some white from cuttings. Their waxy leaves are good for color in all seasons. Also put in some copper beech as I'm working on a micro climate to buffer from the upward sloping garden aspect which leaves the plants open to sea wind.[img][/img]
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garden on 573 Lauragh, Kerry, Feb/Mar.
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Rhodos not yet ready to flower at Derreen in Feb/Mar.
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ramblinman
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2011 4:09 pm    Post subject: what is the name of this tree Reply with quote

hallo,
i just joined the forum.i,m not a gardener myself,i live in an apartment unfotunately but have an interest in trees and nature in general.i live in killarney and spend a nice bit of my spare time in the national park.i would be able to recognise most of the broadleaf trees growing there but there is one tree which i can,t get a name for.i have searched in books and on the internet but can,t find it.an evergreen broadleaf it grows a lot around ross castle and the copper mines area especially.i thought it might be an invasive species like the rhododendron which grows around with it .but i noticed when a lot of the rhododendron was cleared these evergreen broadleaf trees were untouched.i,m sure there not native and were intoduced but what are they?can anyone tell me?thank you.



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