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Did you sow your potatoes early or late???


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tagwex
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Location: Co. Wexford

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@Blowin
"1/3d and 1/9d".

You are showing your age now!!!

"Saving out".

What is saving out?
I made them all tall (6 to 7 ft.) so as i am covered for future crops. The packet says plant them 1" apart and 24" between rows, seems kinda strange that they are so close for a bushy plant.

I just remembered last night that we were down your way three years ago, went to see that disused railway station in the village and went on one of those nature trail walks along the river clodagh, is that anywhere near you? We stayed at the hotel in Dunmanway.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ my potatoes

Ahhh yes I remember now, how easily one forgets these things. I have always found that St. Patricks Day was celebrated with much more passion when one is away on foreign shores, hardly gets a mention here.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
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Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Think yourself lucky. You got out but not everyone does. Yes, I was pretty involved in the guides etc that go with the Walkways (2008)

Saving out - A woodman buys a specified area of woodland, or more specifically the wood on it, for a season. During the cutting months of roughly November - January every stem is cut at ground level and large stacks are formed. This prevents any further chance of growth and the just lie there until the end of Feb, beginning of March.

Then a block for chopping is set up at each stack and stem by stem the woodman assesses what he can get out of it. A really good one will produce a broom handle, a bean stick and a pea bough, some only a pea bough, some nothing at all. Each category is put into different piles ready for tying up etc and this is the skilled operation of 'Saving Out' as it's done in a second each stem as it's taken off the pile. Great fire memories!

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@Blowin: "get out" did you mean get out of the country via emigration or out for a vacation to lovely Dunmanway? We had no guide, just walked the river and picked bluebells.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 6:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a (probably UK-style) joke that, having penetrated the wilds of Drim, you managed to escape back out again.

Browse 'heritage walkways' to relive that walk - or part of it.

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ahhhhhhhhhhhh there was a good road out of it, thankfully!
Looked at that walkers website, are you in any of the photos?

Woooooooooooooooooohoooooooooooooooooooooooo rain at last, must be four or five weeks since we had a decent spill around here. And me like a fool out watering till 11-30 last night, so much for weather forecasts and a brilliant red sky last night too just to confuse matters.

I suppose someone as long at this gardening lark such as you have some polytunnels, I have a greenhouse on order, 12' x 8', sure it's a start.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2013 7:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll do you a pm, Tagwex, as others won't want to read non-gardening stuff.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ my potatoes:

I have just read your website, quite informative. You have given me an idea for next year i.e. four plantings of spuds next year. This year we planted all 1040 plants on June 10th - not by design obviously but by necessity. I would have called Roosters a waxy rather than floury variety though. I note that the most popular variety around here is not on the list - Golden Wonders. Any chance that you can expand your list to take in other varieties and in which of the four plantings that they fall into and possibly those that are blight free, supposedly.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roosters waxy? No way. Definitely a dry matter potato.
No Golden Wonders this year, probably next year. From my own grocer experience the former has passed the latter in popularity.

I'd say I'll be reducing numbers if anything. Most people want either waxy or floury and no further variation. I had some waxy the other day. Didn't feel well afterwards. They just don't do it for me. I'm very sceptical of the new "blight-free" types. Personally, I'd only grow them if I was growing them exclusively.
Would be a bit strange to not spray them when I'm spraying the others.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ my potatoes: Well around here everyone calls roosters soapy which I presume is the equivalent of your waxy. My woman will not eat roosters no way, hates them. I would say they have gotten more popular due to their cheapness compared to the rest and higher yields.

"I'd say I'll be reducing numbers if anything". Ahh no I meant from an information point of view or is it that your website only covers what you actually do? To a novice like me I found it interesting.

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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Lius
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm always amazed at the amount of discussion about the Spud.

This year I went with Coleen & Orla for early and did not spray, there was no sign of blight.

Alongside those I have Sarpo Mira maincrop for the third year, again no spraying. We have hammered this subject here many times, but I have to say I like the taste and cannot understand the bad press they get.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2013 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

@ Lius: Sure isn't it the staple diet of your standard Paddy/Biddy. We all love the spud and its many varieties and ways of cooking it. Next year I am going to make the plot bigger and have eight varieties of potato, two early, two late early, two main crop and two late main crop. Any suggestions for a novice?
_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 10:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I could write a treatise on this, but I'll try to be brief.

Regarding the potato, as tagwax states, it's a staple. Many people still eat potatoes EVERY day. Even spag bol with a few praties on the side or chicken curry with rice, and some aloo. This is not the case with cabbage, leeks or peas.
Some people refer to their dinner as "de schpuds"; much like calling supper "tea". It's also one of the few GYO/GIY where you can expect to save significant money by growing it rather than buying it.

Regarding blight, this is not exclusive to potatoes. Blight conditions may have adverse effects tomatoes, raspberries and roses (e.g. black spot).

Regarding discussion, if we were to remove potatoes and blight, there would be about 50% less posts to this sub-forum; the last thing I'd like to see happen. Sure, read old posts on these topics; but that's hardly discussion. Especially for newbies to this site.

Regarding taste, this is very subjective. Was it 2009 or 2010 was the year of the Pink Fir Apple? I heard so much about it, grew so much of it, it's complex flavour, the subtle nutty hints, the indulgent chips. Alas, it was waxy. No thanks, not for me.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 03, 2013 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Potatoes wrote:

Many people still eat potatoes EVERY day. Even spag bol with a few praties on the side or chicken curry with rice, and some aloo.

Every day? Are those people still out there? Not for us, too fond of spaghetti, pasta and rice the way they are meant to be eaten. Jal ferezi on the menu tonight, yum yum. With no spuds. Potatoes approx. four times a week.

Quote:
de schpuds

Yep, still say that no matter what we are having for dinner.

Quote:
Sure, read old posts on these topics; but that's hardly discussion. Especially for newbies to this site.

Couldn't have put it better myself my potatoes. Being new to this I find it great fun looking through and responding to the posts and getting first hand experience from those in the know. Yes, I can read old topics (which I have) and of course I have my approx. 15 gardening books but it is just not the same. I realise that each newbie that comes along will have much the same questions, ourselves included, and older and wiser people take the time to pass on their knowledge which is just great.

Those Pink Fir Apples look like a nightmare to peel, says she who is the boss in the house! Might try a few though next year.

Any idea when I can harvest my Kerrs pinks? Have been reading up on this and getting various answers, i.e. pick as soon as they flower, leave them for 100 to 120 days, pick approx. 3 weeks after flowering etc. I'm confused. 55 days since they were sown. Currently about 1/4 have flowered starting a week ago. Suppose I could sacrifice one and dig it up to see what it looks like. Either way it's only 5 days since last blight spray so I may wait anyway.

_________________
Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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My Potatoes
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2013 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the topic of micro-climates:
http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=36027#36027
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