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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

Any information on planting leylandii.


 
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Which hedge do you think is the nicest?
Leylandii(Green or Golden)
25%
 25%  [ 2 ]
Privet
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Escallonia
12%
 12%  [ 1 ]
Beech(Green or Purple)
62%
 62%  [ 5 ]
Total Votes : 8

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Olwas2013
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Joined: 13 Jun 2013
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Location: Stradbally Co.Kerry

PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 6:43 pm    Post subject: Any information on planting leylandii. Reply with quote

[size=18]I bought a single leylandii for a huge planter box project I made. Can they be grown in a large planter? This planter has loads of space. Please tell me, do we have to add another stake while it is growing? When will it be strong enough to remove the stake? Will it ever be strong enough in this planter? The plant in its selling pot at the moment is about 120cm high. Will this plant ever grow big enough in this planter that I can remove the stake? How much more do you think its going to grow in this planter?. Please don't tell me that it is a horrible and evil plant. Please don't. I just want to know about it please. I already bought it for 8. If I throw it away I'm literally throwing away 8.
Yours Sincerely,
Olwas2013
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pollen jim
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Location: MULLINGAR

PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hard to tell , till we see planter, also on type of leylandi, it wont grow the rate as it would in the ground,, if really good size planter like 4ft x 4ft x 4ft, should grow good first 5 years, but make sure u put the planter where you want it, because moving it wont be an option, also wind can blow it over when it gets big, as top heavy. you can plant bedding around it also to perk it up, but died back can be a .,problem. you need to give it plenty of water and feed, as they are very thirsty and greedy plant, other options are to plant sweet pea around it in june and you get a wonder effect, christmas tree. everyone will have a different opinion on this, planter most be solid as roots can burst out, enjoy Smile
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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

just keep fit for the rest of your life and upgrade from a sheers to a hedge-clipper to a chainsaw. See! easy! Enjoy!
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davidk
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't do it.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 14, 2013 10:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why not just sell it to someone with lots of space, to grow as a specimen tree?
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tippben
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Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 2:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will get straggly, leggy, and go brown, as you will not be able to keep it fed and watered enough. You'd have to re pot it at least twice a year as it grows. They are just too vigorous. If you keep it, you'll be throwing away far more than 8 euros.
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Olwas2013
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all the information. Sure I'll try it anyway. I love caring for plants that are hard to care for. That's what I do for a living. I heard that the browning is from an aphid attack..
Olwas2013
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member11809
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Olwas2013 wrote:
Thanks for all the information. Sure I'll try it anyway. I love caring for plants that are hard to care for. That's what I do for a living. I heard that the browning is from an aphid attack..
Olwas2013
For someone who cares for plants that are hard to care for a living. you do not seem to know much about them
Quote:
I heard that the browning is from an aphid attack..
Doing it for a living wouldn't you know for sure
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bungaro
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2013 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

have 4 planter boxes and was looking to put leylandii in it as a hedge. the dimensions of the boxes are 36" x 12" x 18". we're only looking for it as a small hedge, maybe 4 foot in total (including the height of the box) and wanted something evergreen so thought this would've been perfect for us but after reading this thread i'm having second thoughts! we're hoping to be out of the house in the next few years so would it be ok for that timeframe??
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tippben
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2013 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

short answer, no Bungaro. You could try Bay (Laurus nobilis), or Box (Buxus sempervirens). You will need to feed feed feed to keep them looking healthy though. Why do you have to use a container rather than planting in the ground?
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bungaro
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2013 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

we've no grass out the front, all the houses on our row have patio stones out the front so planter boxes are the only way to go. i like the look of the buxus, how far apart would you plant them so that they would eventually join up??
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tippben
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2013 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your planters are 36" long, 4 plants is the maximum. Buy them 2-3' high, as they are slow growing. Unfortunately, this also means that they won't be cheap, especially if they've been clipped/topiarised. Put crocks, or stones in the container to assist with drainage, but use a compost with water retaining gel granules (silica gel) to help stop the compost from drying out. Use a general purpose feed, and liquid seaweed feed once a week. If you grow them like this, you will be able to take them with you when you move.
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bungaro
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks for the advice tippben. went with bay hedges in the end. went to a nursery and the bay they had looked good and was the height we were looking for and were only 4 per pot.
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